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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ripe Linux Nits To Pick Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 8:06pm
Story GCC Receives ACM’s 2014 Programming Languages Software Award Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:32pm
Story Six Clicks: The best Linux desktop environments Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:28pm
Story Cauldron 2014: GCC & LLVM Will Look To Collaborate More Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:21pm
Story Linus Torvalds On GCC 4.9: Pure & Utter Crap Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 5:11pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 4:38pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 1:23pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 1:23pm
Story GOG's Mistaken Giveaway, Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS, and Wayland in KDE Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 6:03am
Story Autonomous sub powers up with Wheezy on Haswell Rianne Schestowitz 26/07/2014 - 12:24am

An honest look at Xen and a future with KVM

Filed under
Software

blog.codemonkey.ws: I think we can finally admit that we, the Linux community, made a very big mistake with Xen. Xen should have never been included in a Linux distribution. There, I’ve said it. We’ve all been thinking it, have whispered it in closed rooms, and have done our bests to avoid it.

Book Review: Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Reviews

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Mainstream Linux distributions such as the ever-popular Ubuntu have the potential to contain thousands or tens of thousands of packages and have a wealth of supporting services activated on computer boot ups. Mark G. Sobell’s book A practical guide to Ubuntu Linux, published by Prentice Hall, describes the details of maintaining these complex structures on your own machine.

C++ GUI Programming with Qt4 - Book Review

Filed under
Reviews

linuxhelp.blogspot: Qt is a cross platform application development framework which is widely used for the development of GUI and non-GUI programs. Some of the most visible products which have been developed using Qt are KDE, Opera web browser, Google Earth, Skype and Photoshop Elements.

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People - part 2: The Computing World

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: Once upon a time, there were three computing republics. Apple, Unix, and Windows. They spread out to cover all of the land until the map of the world looked like this:

Looking for Mr. ISV

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: One thing's for sure; with all of this talk about "open source billionaires" out in the ether-web, clearly people have some high expectations of open source's profitability. Or low, depending on the point of view. Honestly, unlike every other technology pundit this week, I'm not looking too hard for the open source billionaires.

Senior Debian developer quits core teams

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: A senior Debian developer, Australian Anthony Towns, has left some core teams of the project and gone quiet in the last couple of weeks, according to project sources.

5 Excellent Ways to Waste Time Online

Filed under
Web

makeuseof.com: The greatest luxury of time is time itself. Thus it’s a deadly sin to simply waste it. So, in our quest to happiness, these are my TOP 5 in covering time gaps with more joy and less boredom:

Top 10 Linux Applications

Filed under
Software

50webs.org: Here's my top ten GUI (Graphical User Interface) applications for Linux, the ones I'm supposed to never live without.

Multi-Pointer X Going Mainline

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In our article earlier this week looking at the status of X.Org 7.4, one of the features originally planned for integration in this X Server release was MPX, or Multi-Pointer X. It's been announced that MPX will finally be merged into the mainline X.Org tree later this month.

bzr, git, and hg performance on the Linux tree

Filed under
Linux

laserjock.wordpress: I just did a historical comparison of git and bzr performance using the Linux source tree. One of the comments I got was “what about Mercurial?” There are a lot of projects using Mercurial, Mozilla being probably the most notable one. So, here’s a comparison of bzr and hg.

other Ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hardy Heron is 0 for 2

  • Exploring other OS options: Ubuntu is Boss!!
  • Ubuntu Open Week unites community and developers
  • Howto: Install Mac Fonts on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux 8.10
  • A Root Shell On Ubuntu : The Right Way

Review: Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: I have to disclose that I have never been a real fan of Ubuntu. I've tried it about every release and had more than my share of issues with it. Ubuntu 8.04 was released last month, and the first reviews mostly spoke of how nice this version was, so I downloaded the i386 version to test.

Also: Ubuntu 8.04: Not quite there, yet

File System and Boot Loader Corruption in Dual Boot Linux System

Filed under
Linux

americanchronicle.com: This is a very helpful and easy method for the users who want to run more than one operating system on the same PC or they want to use some kind of application that specially run on a particular operating system. But there are some situations where if any problem to the one operating system occurs, other operating system will also get affected.

Secure the Hell Out of Your Linux box

Filed under
Linux

tuxtraining.com: In light of your computer rights at boarder security, the House Passing the Pro-IP act, malicious script kiddies and crackers in this world, and if it’s a business machine, also worrying about your competition, there are a lot of people in this world that want to know what you’re doing on your computer and online, legally and illegally.

Linux File Systems: You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
Linux

enterprisestorageforum.com: I am frequently asked by potential customers with high I/O requirements if they can use Linux instead of AIX or Solaris. Can Linux file systems, which I will define as ext-4, XFS and xxx, match the performance of file systems on other UNIX-based large SMP servers such as IBM and Sun?

First look at OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta

Filed under
OOo

blogs.zdnet.com: Since I’m testing the viability of running Ubuntu on a number of platforms, and paving the way to shift from Internet Explorer to Firefox 3.0, I might as well take a look at the viability of abandoning Microsoft Office and making the leap to OpenOffice.org.

KDE 4.0.4 on openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
KDE

andi.opensuse-id.org: After knowing this news, I immediatly took YaST to update all KDE4 packages yesterday. Now, I’m going to mention how to do that in easy (GUI) way, how to install or update KDE 4 to your openSUSE machine (I’m recenty using openSUSE 10.3 right now and used in this whole tutorial). I assume You have installed KDE 4.0 before following this tutorial, see this to install KDE 4.0 in your openSUSE machine.

Best Free MySQL GUI tools for Linux

Filed under
Software

anojrs.blogspot: MySQL is definitely one of the leading opensource database projects around and mainstream companies like google and yahoo have successfully incorporated MySQL into their highly powerful and scalable server platforms. LAMP stacks are increasingly becoming popular and MySQL is a great tool for beginners and students to learn databases.

Running a business on desktop Linux

desktoplinux.com: This paper surveys Linux's suitability for use by owners of very small businesses and the self-employed. It was written by Howard Fosdick, a self-employed database consultant who finds Linux fairly well-suited to his needs, and reckons it has saved him thousands of dollars in recent years.

Review: Shuttle KPC K4500 Compact PC

Filed under
Hardware

computerworld.com: Shuttle's $199 KPC K4500 is a testament to ever-improving computer production techniques and design. With its skin on, it looks like a standard breadbox-size system--a type of PC whose interior tends to be a rat's nest of cables, riser cards, and support members. But the K45 manages to combine a small exterior with a roomy interior.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos