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Tuesday, 23 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Linux Setup - Mike Saunders, Linux Voice Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:11pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.12.5 Is Now Available for Download Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:07pm
Story YotaPhone. Always-on dual screen, thicker than most, but not by much Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:04pm
Story Open source for homeschooling or supplementing your child's education Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:03pm
Story CentOS 6.5 Review – Red Hat for all Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 7:58pm
Story Linux Mint 16 Petra, hands-on: Installing the Cinnamon, MATE, KDE and Xfce versions Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 1:34pm
Story Xen PVH Support Brought Back Up For The Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:51am
Story Valve Set To Debut SteamOS Linux Today Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:43am
Story Linux — La Casa Nostra Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 12:54am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2013 - 6:05pm

Months into the Ubuntu Switchover, rants and raves

Filed under
Ubuntu

cubicgarden: So its been a while but I'm finally getting my head around the gnu/linux system and environment. There are some great things about the switch which makes me cringe everytime I go back into windows (on my work pc and when I want to read my busted sd card - more on this soon). But there are some bad things too.

Also: Ubuntu Gutsy: Lookin’ better than ever!

Trowser: A graphical less command that is more

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Translating a command line tool to a graphical interface usually means a loss of functionality. However, in the case of the newly released trowser text browser, while I wouldn't swear that the transition has retained all the functionality of the less command that it is intended to replace, I doubt that anyone short of an expert is likely to notice the difference.

Linux Kernel: just engineering without a vision?

Filed under
Linux

antirez.com: Yesterday I bought a Microsoft webcam: it's not an exception, like most of the stuff from Microsoft I had (very little, fortunately) something to do with in my life it's a low quality product: all eye candy and little substance.

Communists switch to open-source software

Filed under
OSS

canada.com: Vietnam's Communist Party plans to switch its 20,000 desktop computers nationwide to open-source software next year, avoiding problems with copyright infringement, state media said Friday.

What's Wrong with Open-Source Software?

Filed under
OSS

John C. Dvorak: Though the open-source movement isn't going to die anytime soon, it's looking a little ragged at the edges. And with the appearance of the onerous GPL v3 and the slow deterioration of the popular Firefox browser, I now wonder if open source may have been a fad, or perhaps just a more elaborate iteration of the shareware phenomenon in the 1980s.

All systems go for Ubuntu 7.10 Linux Desktop launch

Filed under
Ubuntu

desktoplinux: Canonical, Ubuntu Linux distribution’s commercial sponsor, has announced that the release version of Ubuntu 7.10 Desktop Edition will launch Oct. 18.

Mandriva 2008: keeping the faith

Filed under
MDV

iTWire: Last week I downloaded Mandriva 2008 just to have a look. The 2008 version of Mandriva is extremely easy to install - it took just 14 minutes for a working interface, including configuring every bit of hardware that I wanted to configure.

KDE 4 Beta packages now available for Fedora 7

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: While Fedora 8 will not ship with KDE 4 as the default KDE version there will be all necessary packages available to provide a development environment. Now these packages also entered the Fedora 7 repository.

So, what about the Linux desktop?

Filed under
Linux

novell cool blogs: The past few weeks I’ve read a number of pieces on the viability of Linux on the desktop. Pros (very few in most cases), cons (complete lists of them!) and more than a few passionate responses. It’s hard to read through these and not be taken by the fervor that nearly everyone writing and commenting has regarding this topic.

An Ubuntu guide to taming the Linux kernel

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: Although Linux is frequently referred to by the names of various distributions, what can properly be called “Linux” is really the management part of the operating system known as the kernel which interacts with the computer’s hardware. Here’s how the kernel works in Ubuntu, and how to rebuild it.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 224

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A look at openSUSE 10.3

  • News: Mandriva 2008 simplified, avoiding Ubuntu download rush, Fedora artwork, interviews with Lucas Villa Real (GoboLinux) and Gerard Beekmans (Linux From Scratch)
  • Released last week: Mandriva Linux 2008, Linspire 6.0
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 7.10
  • New distributions: MitraX, PureOS, Syllable Server, Untangle Gateway Platform
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Upgrade to Gutsy RC

Filed under
Ubuntu

jon-reagan.blogspot: Yesterday afternoon I decided to go ahead and get Ubuntu 7.10, via upgrade. I could not be happier.

Also: Ubuntu will be my primary OS
And: First experience with Ubuntu

Review : Engarde Secure Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

All About Linux: There are hundreds of Linux distributions targeting a diverse sets of users. One such specialized Linux distribution which is targeted specifically at servers is the Engrade Secure Linux. As the name indicates, this Linux distribution lays stress on the security aspect.

Opinion: Desktop Linux Is a Reality Now

Filed under
Linux

computerworld: In his Oct. 1 column, Michael Gartenberg claimed that Linux is still far from making it on the desktop. As someone who has tracked Linux’s progress since 1991 and the progress of the IT industry since 1979, I would like to offer an alternative perspective.

Which companies are helping developing the kernel

Filed under
Linux

lkmltimes: Stefan Heinrichsen asked on the LKML: "Can someone tell me where to find a list of companies (don’t matter in which country) that employ kernel developers?” Greg Kroah-Hartman replied.

Distro hopping by Linux Newbies

Filed under
Linux

Raiden's Realm: New versions of all the major Linux distributions are released regularly throughout the year, with new versions of some distributions croping up almost every week. Downloading, installing and trashing away a Linux distribution recklessly without giving it much time for testing and exploration are the salient land marks of distribution hopping.

The Right Operating System For You: Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.ca: Multi-OS options like dual-booting and virtualization software have made it easier than ever to use whichever OS is best suited to the task you need to perform. Here's our take on the strengths and weaknesses of Linux.

Using Zotero to manage OpenOffice.org bibliographies

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: If OpenOffice.org's own bibliography feature doesn't really cut it for you, you have several choices. One popular bibliography solution is Bibus, a cross-platform tool that integrates nicely with OpenOffice.org. It is, however, not the only bibliographical tool out there. In fact, there is another nifty tool called Zotero that turns Firefox into a powerful research tool.

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More in Tux Machines

Gaming News: Shogun, SteamOS, Dawn Of War III

Galicia continues promotion of free software

The government of the autonomous region of Galicia (Spain) will continue to encourage the use of free and open source software solutions in the public and private sector. This week, the government published the ‘Free Software Plan 2017’, outlining 110 actions. In its ‘Plan de acción software libre 2017’, Galicia announces new initiatives to promote sharing and reuse of ICT solutions. The government is to share new software solutions, but will also emphasise the reuse of existing tools, pointing to Mancomún, the region’s software repository, the catalogue maintained by the Spanish central government’s Centre for Technology Transfer, and to the European Commission’s Joinup eGovernment portal. Read more

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC
    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.
  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi
    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.
  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio
    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.
  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments
    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.
  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop
    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer. However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.
  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core
    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board. Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.

Android Leftovers