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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Installing Zabbix (Server And Agent) On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Zabbix is a solution for monitoring applications, networks, and servers. With Zabbix, you can monitor multiple servers at a time, using a Zabbix server that comes with a web interface (that is used to configure Zabbix and holds the graphs of your systems) and Zabbix agents that are installed on the systems to be monitored.

Government agencies embracing open source: AGIMO

Filed under
OSS

ZDNet: Federal government agencies are adopting free and open source software (FOSS) with increasing zeal, according to a new study undertaken by the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO).

Pardus 2007.2 - A Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

shift+backspace: The latest installment of Pardus, version 2007.2, was officially released on, July 12, 2007. Pardus is a relatively new distribution based on GNU/Linux. The image file for Pardus 2007.2 comes in at around 700MB, but is also available in a 700MB live CD flavour. Please note that the live CD is NOT capable of installing the system onto your hard drive like you can with most live CDs.

Open Source Semantic Desktop Is Coming

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: PC users have volumes of information saved on their computers, most of it disconnected and disparate save for a basic directory system. The answer to connecting all the information into a local semantic Web of information is closer than you might think.

Ubuntu Aftermath: Puncturing The Linux 'Urban Legend'

Filed under
Ubuntu

Information Week blogs: Most of us, even confirmed Windows users, have accepted on some level the idea that Linux really is a better operating system, on a technical level. Not me; not anymore. After my long slog preparing Ubuntu Linux's Achilles' Heel: It's Tough To Install On Laptops, I'm now filing that one in the "urban legend" folder.

The LUG is dead - Long live the soulless marketing corporate junket

Filed under
Linux

freesoftware mag: I can still remember my first LUG meeting; the Greater London Linux User Group at the GND building, London. I met developers, end users, geeks, sysadmins, and a magazine editor who, although neither of us knew it at the time, would later publish my first articles on Linux. These were people with intelligence, soul, and consideration. I had finally found a like-minded milieu for my free software tendancies.

Screen: Tips & Tricks

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HowTos

polishlinux: In this article I will describe a very useful program: GNU Screen. Usually this program is used by people who have a shell account on a Unix server. But it can be also helpful to people who haven’t yet started to use a terminal or even Linux/Unix at all.

Linux: Hibernation With Kexec

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Linux

kernelTRAP: Offering a potential alternative to the existing suspend and restore implementations in the Linux Kernel, Ying Huang posted a patch utilizing kexec, "kexec based hibernation has some potential advantages over uswsusp and suspend2. " He listed two such potential advantages.

Italian parliament bets house on SuSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE

the Inquirer: ITALY'S parliament is about to undertake Europe's largest governmental migration yet to open sauce. The IT department of the Italian parliament presented plans on Wednesday to begin migrating some 3500 desktop PCs, including those of its 630 MPs, away from Windows to SuSE.

Linux Distros for Everyone: Community, Desktop, Hardcore Geek...

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Linux

itmanagement: One of the first things that confounds new users is that GNU/Linux is not a single operating system. Instead, it's the general name for hundreds of closely related operating systems -- distributions or distros, as they are usually called. But exactly what choices are available?

Review: DreamLinux 2.2 Multimedia GL Edition

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

the distrogue: Ever have one of those dreams where everything seems to be going unnaturally well, and then all of the sudden, you wake up and you're late for work? Sure you have. DreamLinux, at least in my experience, was sort of like that.

Even More Gaming In Ubuntu Feisty…

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Gaming

techystuff: After recently putting together a list of 11 great games in Ubuntu, a few concerned readers politely suggested games that should have been on that list. As a result, I discovered many games I hadn’t even heard of, but turned out to be fun.

OpenOffice.org alternatives - Part 2

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: It’s time to resume this new series on looking at alternative free software office suites to OpenOffice.org. In the last part, I looked at word processing alternatives to Writer, and for this part - yeah, you guessed it - I’m going to look at the number crunching spreadsheet side of things.

Thoughts on Flock 0.9

Filed under
Moz/FF

paulstamatiou.com: Recently the social web browser company Flock rolled out a milestone release, version 0.9. While it’s not a 1.0, the new release totes some awe-inspiring new features that put it on a different level than the last major release, Beta 1 (my review), almost a year ago.

A Look at KDE 4 Alpha

Filed under
KDE

thelins: This page is dedicated to tracking the early releases of KDE 4. Each release is being tried out and screenshots are provided. As KDE 4 alpha 2 was released I tested the live CD. For the interested reader I took some screenshots.

Dell fixes Ubuntu laptop pricing

Filed under
Ubuntu

DesktopLinux: Dell Ubuntu Linux buyers were recently outraged when a price comparison between identical Inspiron 1420 laptops showed that instead of the Ubuntu system being cheaper, it actually ended up costing $225 more than the same laptop with Vista Home Basic Edition. Dell says that the prices have been reset to the appropriate prices.

CUPS Purchased by Apple Inc.

Filed under
Software

cups.org: In February of 2007, Apple Inc. acquired ownership the CUPS source code and hired me (Michael R Sweet), the creator of CUPS. CUPS will still be released under the existing GPL2/LGPL2 licensing terms, and I will continue to develop and support CUPS at Apple.

Dude, you don't have to get a Dell

Filed under
Linux

MaximumPC: If you're a newb looking to dip your toe into the waters of the Linux world, Dell's line-up of preinstalled Ubuntu PCs is a very good first choice. But while Dell certainly appears to have the best offering of Linux desktops and notebooks at the moment, it isn't the only choice out there. Here are five alternatives for Linux-ready PCs.

Linux: Reviewing The Tickless Kernel For x86-64

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Included in Andrew Morton's potential 2.6.23 merge list were a series of patches to make the x86-64 architecture tickless. Andi Kleen, the x86-64 maintainer replied, "I'm sceptical about the dynticks code. It just rips out the x86-64 timing code completely."

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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