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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why FOSS isn't on activist agendas

Filed under
OSS

In theory, free and open source software (FOSS) should have a direct appeal to those concerned with ethics and social issues. Yet, in practice, it rarely does. Although the FOSS and activist communities frequently share ethical positions and social interests ranging from freedom of expression and cooperative organization to consumer rights, privacy, and anti-trust legislation, mostly the two groups remain unaware of each other. Why?

Mozilla delivers Thunderbird 2.0 beta, preps Firefox update

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla on Tuesday released the first beta of Thunderbird 2.0, the open-source developer's next-generation e-mail client. It also pushed back the rollout of a Firefox security update by nearly a week.

Review of Minix 3.1.2a IDE build2

Filed under
OS
Reviews

Minix is an operating system designed for "resource limited" or embedded computer systems. Versions 1 and 2 were teaching operating systems upon which the famous book, Operating Systems Design and Implementation, by Andrew S Tanenbaum and Albert S Woodhull, is based and also was the inspiration for Linux. With this latest release, version 3, Minix aims to be a complete, stable, secure desktop operating system for everyday use. Does it live up to those claims?

Migrate Visual Studio C and C++ projects to Eclipse CDT

Filed under
News

The Eclipse Platform is an open source tool to assist you with moving a project from the design to the test phase within a single development environment and without the need for separate tools for each stage. This article provides a step-by-step procedure for migrating Microsoft Visual Studio C/C++ (MSVC) projects to Eclipse. Along the way, we compare and contrast the benefits of using MSVC and Eclipse CDT.

On the Bench: Ulteo Sirius Alpha

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The open source movement has it’s share of heroes. Individuals that can motivate groups of individuals and rally them behind a certain part of the development process. People like Gaël Duval, who created the Mandrake (now Mandriva) distribution, one of the most accessible and user-friendly distributions for W2L migrators. Enough has been said about him being fired from the company he helped to found. Today is today and Gaël Duval is putting himself behind a new project, a new distribution, a new way of using open source software.

Open Invention Network's Jerry Rosenthal Answers Your Questions

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Interviews
OSS

Here are Open Invention Network CEO Jerry Rosenthal's answers to Groklaw's collection of questions about OIN and how it operates. OIN describes itself as "an intellectual property company formed to further the Linux environment by acquiring patents and ensuring their availability". Here are some of those patents.

Ankh for Linux in production

Filed under
Gaming

It seems the 200 interested buyers limit was met without problems at ixSoft, as Ankh for Linux is now mentioned both on ixSoft.de and Rune-soft as being in final release candidate.

New virtualization option for Linux: KVM (and Linux virtualization summary)

Filed under
Linux

KVM stands for 'Kernel-based Virtual Machine' it provides a simple way to have full hardware virtualization available for Linux users on machines that supports either the VT (Intel) or AMD-V/SVM (AMD) extensions for their cpus.

Mark Shuttleworth: Sensory immersion

Filed under
Ubuntu

It was Joi who first described the World of Warcraft scene to me. I was impressed with the scale of it all. But what really intrigued me was Joi’s description of how he’s wiring up a room in his house to be a sort of portal into that other virtual world. Second Life of course brings a new twist to the idea of immersion.

Also: Ubuntu Weekly News

Crossing the OS Divide With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux is fast becoming my operating system of choice because it lacks the software bloat and high overhead plaguing both Microsoft and Apple computing. Those words do not come easily to me. I have been a devout Windows user from the early days.

How to Switch Between GDM and KDM on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

If you have installed the Kubuntu desktop on top of Ubuntu or the other way around, you may want to switch from gdm to kdm, or from kdm to gdm. This is an easy thing to do.

Full Tip.

Also:
How To Switch to Console Mode for Ubuntu VMware Guest

Free Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I use Ubuntu Linux. Have done since the day it was released. And I like it. However, I’ve had more than one argument with Jono about what I perceive as its increasing move towards encouragement of non-free software.

Can Linux Handle Federal Demands?

Filed under
Linux

On December 20, 2006, scale-up Linux experts will come together in an interactive online event to examine the present and future of large scale-up Linux systems and to determine whether they are ready to meet the demands of today’s most challenging applications.

IDC thinks Microsoft will drive people to Linux

Filed under
Linux

IDC HAS GOT out its crystal ball for 2007 and the omens don't look good for Microsoft, it predicts. It reckons Microsoft's anti-piracy efforts on client operating systems will backfire, and that will drive customers towards Linux.

Payback time for Novell

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Software

When it became clear that SCO wouldn’t prevail, Microsoft expected only to face close partner IBM. Microsoft did not brace for Novell, an adversary with a decades-long score to settle with Redmond. Through discovery, Microsoft’s correspondence with SCO is, or soon will be in, Novell’s hands, and it’s a safe bet that it will contain more than demand for a license fee and a copy of a certified check. .

openSUSE 10.2 on the IBM T41 ThinkPad

Filed under
SUSE

My IBM ThinkPad T41 on the other hand is my primary work computer. It goes to the trade shows, it runs VMware, and most importantly, it is where I read my email and calendar. With Evolution. Off an MS Exchange 2003 server. The last Distro I had running on the T41 that was working well for this is Fedora Core 6. I used past tense there because the comments on the last post made me decide to put openSUSE 10.2 on the T41 on my first day of vacation.

Secure email servers from scratch with FreeBSD 6 (Part 2)

Filed under
HowTos

In the last article we parted ways after configuring a base FreeBSD system, enabling it with upgrades via cvsup and portsupgrade, and securing it with a simple ipfw2 firewall. The previous article created a solid foundation which this article will build on, covering the configuration of Postfix, amavisd-new, ClamAV, SpamAssassin, MySQL and finally SquirrelMail for web mail. The final setup will have all the bells and whistles of a high end-mail setup.

Debian: server yes, desktop no

Filed under
Linux

I recently decided to retire Red Hat 7 after seven years of loyal service as a firewall/router-OS on my home LAN. Like a red-headed stepchild grown old, it had become cranky from extended neglect, and no longer would even shutdown or reboot without issuing nasty messages. So, after downloading/burning the latest Debian 3.1 R4 net install CD, I popped it into the K6 box's CD drive and booted her up.

Tip of the Trade: Recovery Is Possible

Filed under
Linux

Recovery is Possible (RIP) sounds like a 12-step program, or some kind of self-help regime. RIP is (yet another) specialized Linux rescue distribution. RIP is for experienced admins who do not need a lot of handholding, or all the bells and whistles of a Jabba-sized live CD Linux, like Knoppix.

Book Review: PHP and MySQL by Example

Filed under
Reviews

You can't really call it the Holy Trinity of open source because there are four of them, but Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP, also known as LAMP, are what Free and Open Source software world revolves around. If you want to learn PHP quickly and efficiently, Ellie Quigley's book is the one to pick up.

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More in Tux Machines

5 Ways to Solve the Open Source Industry's Biggest Problems

Over the last decade, open source software and its audience of end users have greatly matured. Once only used by a small subset of tech-savvy early adopters, the convenience, effectiveness and cost savings of open source solutions are now driving enterprise IT to explore more ways to take advantage of the power of open source in their daily business operations. In today's economy, enterprise IT has less to gain from developing and licensing software and more to gain from actively working with existing open source technology. However, the march toward open source still faces major obstacles before it becomes mainstream. In this slideshow, Travis Oliphant, CEO and founder of Continuum Analytics, outlines five challenges preventing enterprise IT from shifting to open source and tips for tackling them to keep the future of open source heading in the right direction. The road may be winding, but it will eventually lead companies to open source to help them innovate and as the way of the future. Read more Also: Latest attacks on privacy...

Security News

  • Jay Beale: Linux Security and Remembering Bastille Linux
    Security expert and co-creator of the Linux-hardening (and now Unix-hardening) project Bastille Linux. That’s Jay Beale. He’s been working with Linux, and specifically on security, since the late 1980s. The greatest threat to Linux these days? According to Beale, the thing you really need to watch out for is your Android phone, which your handset manufacturer and wireless carrier may or may not be good about updating with the latest security patches. Even worse? Applications you get outside of the controlled Google Play and Amazon environments, where who-knows-what malware may lurk. On your regular desktop or laptop Linux installation, Beale says the best security precaution you can take is encrypting your hard drive — which isn’t at all hard to do. He and I also talked a bit, toward the end, about how “the Linux community” was so tiny, once upon a time, that it wasn’t hard to know most of its major players. He also has some words of encouragement for those of you who are new to Linux and possibly a bit confused now and then. We were all new and confused once upon a time, and got less confused as we learned. Guess what? You can learn, too, and you never know where that knowledge can take you.
  • Automotive security: How safe is a next-generation car?
    The vehicles we drive are becoming increasingly connected through a variety of technologies. Features such as keyless entry and self-diagnostics are becoming commonplace. Unfortunately, they can also introduce IT security issues.
  • Let's Encrypt: Every Server on the Internet Should Have a Certificate
    The web is not secure. As of August 2016, only 45.5 percent of Firefox page loads are HTTPS, according to Josh Aas, co-founder and executive director of Internet Security Research Group. This number should be 100 percent, he said in his talk called “Let’s Encrypt: A Free, Automated, and Open Certificate Authority” at LinuxCon North America. Why is HTTPS so important? Because without security, users are not in control of their data and unencrypted traffic can be modified. The web is wonderfully complex and, Aas said, it’s a fool’s errand to try to protect this certain thing or that. Instead, we need to protect everything. That’s why, in the summer of 2012, Aas and his friend and co-worker Eric Rescorla decided to address the problem and began working on what would become the Let’s Encrypt project.
  • OpenSSL 1.1 Released With Many Changes
    OpenSSL 1.1.0 was released today as a major update to this free software cryptography and SSL/TLS toolkit. In addition to OpenSSL 1.1 rolling out a new build system and new security levels and support for pipelining and a new threading API, security additions to OpenSSL 1.1 include adding the AFALG engine, support for ChaChao20 in libcrypto/libssl, scrypto algorithm support, and support for X25519, among many other additions.
  • Is Windows ​10’s ‘Hidden Administrator Account’ a security risk? [Ed: Damage control from Microsoft Jack (Jack Schofield) because Microsoft Windows is vulnerable by design]

Microsoft Breaks Windows, Will Take a Long Time to Fix What It Labels 'Open'

4Duino combines Arduino, WiFi, and a 2.4-inch touchscreen

4D Systems launched a $79 “4Duino-24” Arduino compatible board, with a 2.4-inch resistive touchscreen and an ESP8266 WiFi module. One reason you might choose a Linux SBC like a Raspberry Pi over an Arduino is that it’s easier to control an LCD display for simple IoT GUIs and other HMI applications. Now the 4Duino-24 board aims to smooth the path to Arduino-based IoT displays with an Arduino Leonardo clone board that not only adds an ESP8266 WiFi module, but also includes a 2.4-inch TFT LCD display with resistive touch. Read more Also: Tegra TK1 COM Express module runs Ubuntu at 15W