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Monday, 27 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Removing a major Compiz annoyance

Filed under
HowTos

As much as I love the 3D Compiz/Cgwd, there is one thing I can do without: Wobbly menus. Here's how to turn off this behavior in the most recent installation of Compiz.

Also: Animate the Desktop with Xgl and Compiz

People Behind KDE: Allan Sandfeld Jensen

Filed under
KDE

Tonight in the two-weekly People Behind KDE series we are featuring Allan Sandfeld Jensen. He is a KDE core developer, mostly active for KHTML and KDE multimedia. After reading the interview you will know what his personal "carewolf" looks like, together with all other personal things you have to know about this developer.

Does an OS have to be costlier than the hardware on which it is run ?

Filed under
Linux

Does an OS have to be as costly or even more than the hardware on which it runs? This seems to be the question that I am forced to ponder myself again and again. When I open the day's newspaper, I am besieged by ad after ad offering to sell PCs at bargain prices, some of them as low as $250.

OS Users are Attack Dogs

Filed under
Misc

If there was one commonality to describe the "hardcore" users from all three computing platforms, it would have to be the fact that many of them spend too much time making excuses for their OS' inadequacies. When they're not doing this, they're hard at work poking and prodding their least favorite columnists.

NASA tests Linux-based planetary surface exploration robots

Filed under
Linux

A Linux-based NASA lunar rover is on maneuvers -- and Internet webcams -- this week in the Arizona desert near Meteor Crater. The K-10's maneuvers are related to a NASA project tasked with building extra-vehicular activity (EVA) hardware and developing EVA procedures for planetary surface exploration.

Give Linux one more chance -- this time you won't regret it

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you have an old PC lying around (or even a brand new one), this may be the time to give Linux another try. Yes, I know, you expect Linux, the free operating system developed by volunteers worldwide, to be nerdy and hard to use.

Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks by Rickford Grant

Filed under
Reviews

Sometimes I wonder what separates the geeks from the non-geeks. I’ve always assumed I fell into the geek category based on my job and the hours spent with computers on my own time. But, after reading Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks, I must not be much of a geek because I found this book to be quite interesting!

Create your own Planet

Filed under
HowTos

Major open source projects like GNOME, KDE, Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, and Apache all have something in common -- they all have Planet feed reader sites set up to aggregate developer blog feeds. The Planet software was developed to power Planet GNOME and Planet Debian, but now it's being used by dozens of open source projects. With just a few simple steps, you can set up a Planet aggregator to watch your favorite blogs or to help publicize your favorite project.

Bart Decrem Flocks off

Filed under
Software

THE FOUNDER Web browser outfit Flock seems to have quit the company and headed off in search of pastures new. Bart Decrem has stepped down as CEO and is looking to build another company.

Who are the Hacker Bloggers?

Filed under
Misc

In many ways, an open source project is just like a business. There is a product - admittedly one with a price tag of zero - serving customers; ideally, the managers, aka project leaders, would like more people to use that "product". So doesn't this imply that those in the open source "business" should be blogging away just like their commercial brothers and sisters?

Howto Install Java

Filed under
HowTos

While many distributions already have Java installed, several don't. Installing Java in Firefox or Mozilla is really quite an uncomplicated process, but can look daunting to a Noob.

Avoiding slow package updates with package diffs

Filed under
HowTos

If you're using the unstable or testing distribution of Debian GNU/Linux you will almost certainly have noticed that apt-get uses daily-diffs for its package updates. In many common situtations this is more bandwidth efficient, however it isn't always appropriate.

Mandriva 2007 Right Around the Corner?

Filed under
MDV

While folks were looking for a RC2 to be released today, news of the final being released to early seeders hits the Mandriva Club.

Mandriva powers up a serious business-server Linux

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux, formerly Mandrake Linux, on Sept. 14 will ship a major upgrade to its business server-oriented Linux distribution. The company claims that Mandriva Corporate Server 4 is fully compliant with the LSB (Linux Standard Base), and therefore should have interoperability with products from other LSB-compliant vendors.

Gnome 2.16 and Debian

Filed under
News

Gnome 2.16 is out... so when will it hit Debian?

How to enable numlock at startup automatically in Gnome on CentOS?

Filed under
HowTos

CentOS is a great desktop, but unfortunately, the NUMLOCK key isn't enabled by default when you start your computer, which is annoying when you start typing numbers and you realise it doesn't work as expected.

Dell's AMD computers now available

Filed under
Hardware

Following Michael Dell's announcement yesterday, Dell today released configuration pages for its initial AMD-based systems this morning. The computers can be ordered now.

RHEL5 Beta1 Client: Astonishment (scratch, scratch...)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

And it worked. The new RHEL5 Beta1, which is a public beta — so I could D/L and test it. Unfortunately for "them", I am not interested in Xen, so I don't even know if it works. I can say however that it looked speedy to me.

Linux-enabled ThinkPad

Filed under
Linux

At only an inch thin and just over 2 kg, the new Linux-supported ThinkPad T60p strikes the balance between productivity and portability, giving electronic design engineers the processor speeds and memory requirements necessary for industrial-strength applications such as computer aided design (CAD).

OOoBasic crash course: Replacement therapy

Filed under
HowTos

In a perfect world everyone would write in standard English and all publications would use a universal style guide. In the real world, however, you have to deal with different versions of English (British, American, Australian, etc.), and every publication has its own set of writing guidelines. If you write for several markets, things can get pretty complicated. But instead of wasting time on language idiosyncrasies, you can let an OOoBasic macro do the donkey work. Let's create a macro that converts from British English to US English. You can easily modify it later for other text conversion purposes.

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