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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Elementary OS’s Pantheon Desktop May Become Available On Fedora Systems, Starting With Fedora 22 Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 9:09pm
Story Docker in Production — What We’ve Learned Launching Over 300 Million Containers Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Review: Scientific Linux 7.0 GNOME Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Free software hacker on open source telemetry project for OpenStack Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 8:12pm
Story Take Control With Open Source Hardware Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 8:07pm
Story TI spices up Jacinto auto SoCs with ADAS support Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 7:57pm
Story LISA14 – Simplified Remote Management of Linux Servers Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 7:57pm
Story Amazing ! 25 Linux Performance Monitoring Tools Rianne Schestowitz 22/10/2014 - 7:49pm

Getting closer to Opera 9.52

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: All right. Another snapshot for you as we're getting ever closer to version 9.52. Fixed problem where some IRC commands were not working, Fixed problem where UI would not update after unsubscribing an IMAP folder, and Several improvements to the skin.

And then there are some days that suck

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: You get an error message upon booting up. Something like kernel panic. Your friend has the webcam oh Yahoo! Messenger and you couldn’t view it. The cd you got from a friend could not be mounted...

Is Microsoft trying to kill Apache?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: When the story about Microsoft shelling out $100,000 to Apache for ASF sponsorship broke across my radar it rather tickled my funny bone and my curiosity. When ASF Chairman Jim Jagielski declared that “Microsoft’s sponsorship makes it clear that Microsoft “gets it” regarding the ASF” I had a fit of the giggles—and then, like many others, I started to ponder on the reasons why and what it actually meant.

Three things the Linux desktops needs to do to beat Windows

Filed under
Linux

sjvn: "What does Linux need to do to compete more successfully on the desktop?" We came up with several pain points, but some of them are clearly hurting Linux more than the others.

Amarok 2: a first look

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: With all the hoopla that has been surrounding KDE 4, I’d almost forget there’s another major piece of software working on a milestone release. Maybe not as major as KDE, but Amarok is arguably the best and most popular media player on the linux desktop. Amarok 2 is shaping up to be as radically different from Amarok 1.4 and that’s a very good thing indeed.

Linux Users on NBC's Olympics Videos: We Don't Get No Respect

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Where is Rodney Dangerfield when we need him? There are some heated messages flying around in the Ubuntu forums because NBC has announced that it will offer its online video coverage of the Beijing Olympics to Internet Explorer and Firefox users on the Mac and Windows, but not to Linux browser users.

Linspire is going away

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Linspire, the distribution originally launched as Lindows, is no more, says Xandros CEO Andreas Typaldos.

Kernel Log: Btrfs 0.16 released, new stable kernels released, Wifi drivers for 2.6.27 merged

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The developers of Btrfs have released version 0.16 of the still experimental file system. new features include Access Control Lists, support for which is needed by SE Linux, and orphan inode protection to stop losing files after a crash. Alongside these new features are improvements in the scalability and performance of the new file system.

Linux patent pool to push for 'defensive publication'

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com (IDG): A tech vendor-backed company that buys up patents in an effort to protect the Linux community from intellectual property litigation will soon launch a Web site to help inventors file defensive publications -- documents that make details of an invention public, preventing others from later making patent claims on it.

Ubuntu after One Week

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.markwill.com: In my quest to run exclusively Ubuntu Linux (a free alternative to Microsoft Windows) at home for one month, I have completed the first week.

Memopal Recruits 100 Linux Beta Testers

Filed under
Linux

marketwatch.com (PR): Memopal http://www.memopal.com continuous, automatic, and long-term online backup. Memopal is looking for 100 beta testers around the world to form a Linux community that will help it develop the first low-cost online backup system for Linux.

How I Helped Build Refurbished Linux PCs at LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Building and using Linux-based PCs is a rewarding and fullfilling pastime for open source enthusiasts, but spreading the gospel to the masses can be even more satisfying.

3 Linux Apps That Make Me Hate Windows

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: I'm a Windows user, and it's served me well. That being said, I play with a lot of Linux distributions and there are some applications that are just so much better than anything Windows can offer that I find myself wondering how long it'll be until I make the switch.

How trustworthy are Linux binaries?

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: How truly trustworthy are binary files on Linux? I only ask this question because of a recent article on Slashdot that brought up an interesting point about binaries distributed on Linux. Not directly of course, but the implications are there.

12 Great Quotes from “The Cathedral and the Bazaar”

Filed under
OSS

junauza.com: The Cathedral and the Bazaar, a famous essay by Eric S. Raymond, has been a great inspiration by many open source software developers. I’m going to share to you a few highly inspiring quotes that I took from The Cathedral and the Bazaar:

Licensing Gives Linux the Edge over Windows in the Virtualization Battle

Filed under
Linux

oreillynet.com/onlamp/blog: There’s been a lot of interesting product wars over the years: WordPerfect vs. Word, 1-2-3 vs. Excel... One of the current product battles taking shape is in server virtualization. And, like many past product confrontations, Microsoft’s Hyper-V is the late-to-the-game underdog.

Linux games - First Person Shooters

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: One of the major reasons why most of people still use Windows is the gaming community. It begins with constant hardware upgrades, required to stay apace in the losing game of ever-rising minimum requirements for this or that game. But this does not have to be so.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • KDE 4.1 packages under Mandriva 2008.1 Spring

  • ssh-xfer: Quickly grabbing files over an existing SSH connection
  • How to install and setup Netbook Remix on the Eee PC
  • Tweak Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) for VMware Server
  • Getting the current weather on your Ubuntu desktop
  • Connecting Ubuntu Linux to a networked printer

Thinkfree Office Suite On Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

ma65p.wordpress: I tried out Thinkfree about a year ago and just recently check back and it was a pleasant surprise. The website looks much more professional and the user interface for the online version is total awesome. Best off all, Thinkfree offers an offline version that sync seemlessly with the online storage. I love it.

Installfest: Untangle, Ubuntu Linux Save 750 PCs From Landfills

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The final numbers are in. During Installfest at this week’s LinuxWorld Expo, Untangle and its partners put Ubuntu Linux on 750 aging PCs that now run like new.

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More in Tux Machines

today's lefftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words
    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People
    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.
  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through
    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse. I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.
  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018
    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.
  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh! [...] I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.
  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.

Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime

  • Highlights of the French cybersecurity strategy

    First, the document describes that in France cyberdefence and cyberoffence are separated. This is directly opposed to the models employed in Anglo-Saxon countries. But it’s shown as an asset. Key argument: it respects freedoms and civil liberties.

    The document then lists the six general objectives of cyberdefence, namely: prevention, anticipation, protection, detection, attribution, reaction (remediation). The strategy itself is complete, it focuses on civil, military, domestic, external, and international levels. Let’s say it’s a rarity in the business in strategic cybersecurity documents.

    [...]

    The strategy then mentions that one of the solutions could be to release source code and documentation after an end of support date.

  • The Munich Security Conference 2018

    Over the past five decades, the Munich Security Conference (MSC) has become the major global forum for the discussion of security policy. Each February, it brings together more than 450 senior decision-makers from around the world, including heads-of-state, ministers, leading personalities of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as high ranking representatives of industry, media, academia, and civil society, to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.

  • Smart meters could leave British homes vulnerable to cyber attacks, experts have warned
    New smart energy meters that the Government wants to be installed in millions of homes will leave householders vulnerable to cyber attacks, ministers have been warned.
  • MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime: Researchers nail exploits
    "The flaws—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—are in chips made by Intel and other major suppliers. They can allow hackers to steal data from the memory of running apps, including password managers, browsers and emails." The authors of the paper on arXiv, Caroline Trippel, Daniel Lustig, and Margaret Martonosi, discuss a tool they developed for "automatically synthesizing microarchitecture-specific programs capable of producing any user-specified hardware execution pattern of interest." They said they show "how this tool can be used for generating small microarchitecture-specific programs which represent exploits in their most abstracted form—security litmus tests."

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more