Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What if… KDE Started using Client-Side Decorations? Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 5:31pm
Story GNOME: A WEEKEND HACK Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 5:18pm
Story Conky Manager to Fedora Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:45am
Story Taiga, a new open source project management tool with focus on usability Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:17am
Story Android Wear Gets Its First Big Update Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:03am
Story Positive results from Outreach Program for Women Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:58am
Story Mesa 10.3.2 Has A Couple Bug-Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:47am
Story openSUSE Tumbling, Fedora Slipping, and Calculating Linux Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:37am
Story Ubuntu's shiny 10th birthday Unicorn: An upgrade fantasy Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:24am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 11:07pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Myth: Installing “Third Party” Software is “Hard”

  • Red Hat Solutions Provide Reliability and Performance Gains for Munich Airport
  • Debian Bug Count Rising
  • Marble provides basic engine for free Google Earth replacement
  • Did the big boys really kill OLPC?
  • When happened this to GNOME?
  • openSUSE vanilla kernel part 2….
  • Vote on the OpenOffice.org 3.0 splash screen
  • Running Ubuntu on an Asus EEE 4G
  • Hadoop: When grownups do open source
  • Linux rises to top dog in servers
  • Why Ubuntu just might succeed
  • Linus Torvalds & the Woodshed
  • What the heck is Mozilla thinking?
  • KDE-PIM Hackers Present Integration of KDE 4 Frameworks
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 08/08
  • 12 great apps for bridging Windows, Linux and Macs
  • Recovering Deleted Files By Inode Number In Linux And Unix
  • There and back again: a narrative of OSCON 2008
  • Open Source Software Gaining Ground
  • Linux Application Checker Brings Distro Help

Hiding Software Versions - A Step Forward to a Secure Server

Filed under
HowTos

Howto change the default behavior of showing the software version for some popular packages on Ubuntu 8.04.1 Server, such as Postfix, Apache, PHP, and VSFTPD.

CentOS 5.2 - Send in the Clones

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: CentOS, for those unfamiliar, is a clone distribution. The maintainers take the freely-available source code released by Redhat for its commercial Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) product and recompile it, stripping out any trademarked artwork, then redistribute it as CentOS.

Dell shipping five Hardy Heron systems

Filed under
Ubuntu

desktoplinux.com: Dell is shipping two new laptops with widescreen LCD displays and Ubuntu Hardy Heron (8.04) operating systems with DVD playback. Additionally, the largest U.S. PC maker has started offering Hardy Heron on three models previously available with the earlier Gutsy Gibbon Ubuntu release.

Mandriva 2009 Beta 2 - KDE 4.1 thoughts and comments

Filed under
MDV

blog.linuxbox.co.nz: I recently downloaded the Mandriva 2009.0 beta 2 KDE 4.1 live cd. I kept of list of things I found as I had a look around it. I only focused on the desktop.

Top 4 Alternatives to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux

intranetjournal.com: Considering the success of Ubuntu Linux as a distribution of the open source operating system, it has become clear that locating good alternatives to this release is becoming increasingly difficult. With that said, I've decided to round up the best candidates.

Zenwalk 5.2 GNOME Edition (beta)

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: Finally. Since 1995, when Patrick Volkerding announced that he would no longer include GNOME in Slackware, people had to rely on projects like GWARE, GNOME Slackbuild or Dropline to enjoy their favourite desktop environment on the oldest Linux distribution around. Until now.

Debian: The OS for the rest of us

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Lately I have been poking at various Linux distributions to see what they have to offer. But most of the distributions I have looked at are geared toward new users, users with older (or strange) hardware, or corporate users. But what about those that do not fall into any of the above? What about those Linux users who want a challenge? Something that doesn’t hand-hold you through the entire computing experience? Well, you’re in luck.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Bash & (Ampersand)

  • Accessing Ubuntu files after reformatting Windows
  • Add Computer Network And Trash Icons To Desktop
  • Creating global keyboard shortcuts in GNOME
  • Bash Trap Control C
  • How to Install aMSN 0.98b with anti-aliasing in Ubuntu
  • Recover plesk access
  • Puppet can ease system administration tasks across the network
  • Floating Point Math in Bash, Part 2 (Wait for System Load)
  • Linux Guides (Must Read)

My disagreement with Richard Stallman

Filed under
OSS

geekzone.co.nz: Software and computers are all pervasive in today's world and thus demand our utmost diligence: The lives we live are run and organised by software, we depend on software, we trust our most intimate data to software systems. Thus, the importance of free software: Only free software can protect our freedoms.

The Linux desktop, Mac OS X, and barking dogs

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: There are, of course, the constant reports of how easy Linux is to install and use on the desktop. Then there are the more pragmatic posts like this one from Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols calling out a few things Linux needs to succeed on the desktop, despite its otherwise strong credentials. And yet the dog isn't barking. Few are buying. Why?

OpenGL 3.0 released

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: The Khronos Group has released a new mile stone version of the OpenGL API: version 3.0, codename Long Peaks. While this is really good news, Khronos is still unable to communicate with the community.

Reimagining The Desktop

Filed under
KDE
Linux
MDV

Here is an interesting discussion of the changes KDE 4 (via Mandriva Linux 2009 pre-releases) brings to desktop interaction. It's a very comprehensive and thoughtful discussion and explanation of the new features KDE 4 introduces and what they mean for how you interact with your desktop. If you're not sure how to go about using KDE 4 to its full potential, read it!

The community Linux impact

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: A recent talk I led about community Linux and Ubuntu in the enterprise at LinuxWorld generated some discussion over at Slashdot. I can’t say that I completely agree with the headline, ‘Paid support not critical for Linux adoption.’ Well, not critical to some adoption. If we’re talking about the enterprise, and particularly if we’re talking large enterprise, paid support is absolutely, positively critical to use of Linux.

Announcing ENOS 2008

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The acronym ENOS stands for ‘Encontro Nacional de openSUSE‘, a Portuguese expression which can be translated to ‘National openSUSE Meeting‘, an event meant to unite the Portuguese openSUSE users, as well as provide the participants an inside view into the latest developments in the openSUSE project and stimulate them to take an active part in the community itself.

Giving an old Windows hand some Linux advice

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: I see my colleague Preston Gralla is looking for the best Linux for a Windows pro. That's a good question with several good answers.

Why lawyers don't like Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Professionals who work on the basis of billable hours rarely take the time out to write an article for publication unless they have a valid reason for doing so. That's why I'm generally a bit sceptical when lawyers come out with articles that attempt to make a case against the use of free and open source sofware.

The kids are all right with Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: School starts early in Georgia. The kids are all back at it. It was on a pre-semester visit to my son’s high school that I got a shock on Friday. Linux.

Why Vista is not ready for Linux and Mac users

Filed under
Microsoft

izanbardprince.wordpress: I’ve started my simulated migration from Linux to Vista already, starting my dog food challenge two days early, I will go over my findings so far, sometimes making the assumptions a new Windows user would, and mostly from the perspective of a Linux “switcher”, with a dose of sarcasm.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu devs are considering using empathy as default for Intrepid

  • Why GnomeBaker and Brasero Aren't Standard on Gnome
  • Ubuntu: Intrepid Ibex - A quick look at Empathy
  • Ubuntu Podcast Episode #4
  • How I plan on fixing Wine for Intrepid
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Security: Updates, Word and More

Mozilla Development and News

  • Removing Support for Unpacked Extensions
    With the release of Firefox 62 (currently scheduled for August 21, 2018) Mozilla will discontinue support for unpacked sideloaded extensions. You will no longer be able to load an extension via the Windows registry by creating an entry with an extension’s directory (i.e. unpacked) after Firefox 61. Starting with Firefox 62, extensions sideloaded via the Windows registry must be complete XPI files (i.e. packed).
  • Making a Clap-Sensing Web Thing
    The Project Things Gateway exists as a platform to bring all of your IoT devices together under a unified umbrella, using a standardized HTTP-based API. We recently announced the Things Gateway and we’ve started a series of hands-on project posts for people who want to set up a Gateway and start playing around with the Web of Things. Earlier this month we began with a high-level overview of how to build a Gateway add-on.
  • Trying Mozilla's Things Gateway
    I have an old Raspberry Pi 1 Model B with a RaZberry Z-Wave Daughterboard which I had soldered a larger external antenna on to last year. I used to run OpenHAB on it to control some z-wave devices before I moved last year and since then it's just been in a box. Let's fire it up! This original Raspberry Pi is a single core 700mhz CPU, so I'm planning on running it headless and doing everything remotely over SSH to save on GUI resources.
  • Lando Demo
    Lando is so close now that I can practically smell the tibanna. Israel put together a quick demo of Phabricator/BMO/Lando/hg running on his local system, which is only a few patches away from being a deployed reality.
  • Snips Uses Rust to Build an Embedded Voice Assistant
    The team at Paris-based Snips has created a voice assistant that can be embedded in a single device or used in a home network to control lights, thermostat, music, and more. You can build a home hub on a Raspberry Pi and ask it for a weather report, to play your favorite song, or to brew up a double espresso. Manufacturers like Keecker are adding Snips’ technology to products like multimedia home robots. And Snips works closely with leaders across the value chain, like NVIDIA, EBV, and Analog Devices, in order to voice-enable an increasingly wider range of device types, from speakers to home automation systems to cars.
  • Mozilla v FCC: Mozilla Re-files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality
    This morning, the Federal Communications Commission officially published its order overturning net neutrality rules in the Federal Register. We had originally filed suit early while simultaneously urging the court that the correct date was after this publication. We did this in an abundance of caution because we’re not taking any chances with an issue of this importance. That is why today, immediately after the order was published, Mozilla re-filed our suit challenging the FCC net neutrality order. We won’t waste a minute in our fight to protect net neutrality because it’s our mission to ensure the internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all. An internet that truly puts people first, where individuals can shape their own experience and are empowered, safe and independent.
  • The Death Of Net Neutrality Will Be Official In April (Cue The Lawsuits)
    Of course that's really just the beginning of an entirely new chapter in the fight to prevent broadband monopolies from abusing a lack of competition in the broadband space (remember: net neutrality violations are just a symptom of a lack of competition, a problem nobody wants to seriously address for fear of upsetting campaign contributors). The publication in the Federal Register opens the door to the myriad lawsuits that will be filed against the agency. Those lawsuits range from suits by Mozilla and consumer groups, to the 22 state attorneys general who say they're also suing the agency for ignoring the public interest. These lawsuits must be filed within the next 60 days. Expect the court battle to quickly begin heating up in March.

Google Summer of Code 2018 for Qt and Qt Roadmap for 2018

  • The Qt Project and Google Summer of Code 2018
    This year, for the first time, the Qt Project will be participating in the Google Summer of Code initiative.
  • Qt Roadmap for 2018
    Qt 5.9 LTS is a solid baseline, which continues to improve still during 2018. Qt 5.10 was released in December, but there is more cooking. We are currently finalizing the Qt 5.11 release for May and looking towards Qt 5.12 LTS in November. In addition to the Qt framework we are actively developing our tooling offering. Tune in for an overview what we have in the works for 2018.
  • Qt Has A Super Busy Year Ahead With A Lot Of Features Planned For 2018
    Tuukka Turunen of The Qt Company has shared some of the company's plans for the Qt toolkit in 2018. There is a lot ahead for this open-source, cross-platform toolkit in 2018 with another long-term support release later this year, new Qt Python bindings, a safety-critical renderer and more.