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Monday, 22 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Mandriva 2008.0 rocks

Filed under
MDV

linux.com: Mandriva 2008.0, released this week, is the best version of Mandriva since 7.2. Mandriva was once known as the best distro for new users, while accommodating those more experienced. In its current incarnation, this is still so. 2008.0 is an exceptionally impressive release.

10 Rocking Features in 10 Days: Day 3: Sharing your computer with Fast User Switching

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Yesterday we took a look at all the handy new features of X in Ubuntu 7.10 and today we turn to Fast User Switching which allows you to easily share your computer with others

What is Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Many readers here define open source narrowly. It’s a business model, a development model, a way in which enterprise customers gain more power over their own IT. It’s all that, but it’s much more.

The BSD Community Compared to the Linux Community

Filed under
BSD

Penguin Pete: An amazing experience occurred when I began to run BSD. It was a Jedi event. I was jolted by something that suddenly stopped when I started BSD, something I hadn't been aware of until it was gone. I experienced a great calming in The Force; as if a million screaming, bitching voices suddenly shut the hell up!

openSUSE 10.3 in review: A solid Linux desktop

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Reviews

openSUSE is a popular German Linux distribution that Distrowatch.com lists as one of the "top ten." Version 10.3 was released on October 4th. Underneath its new green artwork, the new version's improvements include cutting down the time it takes to reach the graphical login screen; speeding up and streamlining its package management utility; and making it easier for users to install software using a new "one-click install" process. There's a lot to like here.

KDE 4 Preview [rev 723381]

Filed under
KDE

polishlinux: KDE 4 is coming. It’s starting to look and behave mature enough to use it on a normal desktop. This article is a little introduction to what you might be expecting from the brand new KDE due later this year. Not waiting any longer I made my mind and I have updated the SVN and have run the cmake.

New Alien Arena 6.10 blows away its FPS competition

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Today, COR Entertainment is scheduled to release version 6.10 of Alien Arena 2007, the popular free software, 3-D, first-person shooter built atop id Software's Quake II engine, which was released under the GPL in 2001. The new release of Alien Arena comes with seven new arenas, a better arsenal of weaponry, and a new game mode for one-on-one duels.

People of openSUSE: Martin Lasarsch

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: Martin Lasarsch, the well-known openSUSE evangelist, gave us the great opportunity to let us know a little bit more about himself. You can’t miss this ‘People of openSUSE’ interview!

Don't look to Linus Torvalds for leadership

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: "Not a whole lot of changes since -rc9, although there's a few updates to mips, sparc64 and blackfin in there." Reading this release announcement, if we can even call it that, you'd never imagine that Torvalds was leading the evolution of software. The big question on which Torvalds is conspicuously silent is how the Linux community should respond to the Microsoft threat.

Linux patent suit: In search of the Microsoft smoking gun

Filed under
Linux

Mary Jo Foley: Now that the “first ever” suit for patent infringement has been lodged against two major Linux distributors, many Microsoft watchers are looking for the smoking gun that will somehow connect Microsoft to the case.

Also: Patent troll launches desktop Linux lawsuit. Is Microsoft involved?

Open Source Gaming Review: Frozen Bubble

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: Frozen Bubble is a pop-cap style game that puts the user into a world of colored balls, ice and penguins. While that might sound a bit silly, that's the whole point. The game works on the same principle as several very popular pop-cap style games such as "Dinosaur Eggs" and even the classic game "Puzzle Bobble" that started it all.

Dell: Microsoft warnings haven't hurt Linux uptake

Filed under
Linux

zdnet: Claims made by Microsoft that Linux violates its software patent have not affected sales of Linux-based hardware, according to Michael Dell.

Dinosaur Sightings: 1970s computers

Filed under
Sci/Tech

c|net: This gallery showcases several 1970s-era machines from Steven Stengel's vintage computer collection. Stengel has graciously allowed CNET to republish his photos and descriptions. The Model 5100 is IBM's first microcomputer (not a mainframe) and is also considered the world's first portable computer.

23 Most Valuable Free Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot.com: I have compiled 23 of the most outstanding free/open source software. If these software have price tags, I would consider them the most expensive and valuable.

An interview with Gerard Beekmans of Linux from Scratch

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Interviews

iTToolbox blogs: There are so many different Linux distributions around and perhaps for you, none of them tickle your fancy. Fortunately Linux has a solution. You can build your own Linux from scratch. It is not that hard and there is even a tried and true set of instructions to help you build it. This was all started off by a man with vision and an itch to scratch so he scratched it by documenting his own Linux build. Here is the inside info straight from the guy himself.

Some musings on OpenSuse 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

joeblog.info: Naturally, I had to give it it try, even if only in VMWare. What follows is not a complete test, but only some impressions.

Quick Look at Ubuntu 7.10 Release Candidate

Filed under
Ubuntu
-s

Those that know me or my work in the Linux community know I always see the good in Linux distributions and open source software. I'm a "glass-is-half-full" kinda gal where Linux is concerned. But I'm having a hard time finding anything good at all to say about Ubuntu. Why the h-e-double_hockey_sticks is it so popular? It's the next thing to running nothing there is.

The Perfect Desktop - Slackware 12

Filed under
Slack
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Slackware 12 GNU/Linux desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktop.

Patent Infringement Lawsuit Filed Against Red Hat & Novell

Filed under
Legal

groklaw: IP Innovation LLC has just filed a patent infringement claim against Red Hat and Novell. It was filed October 9, case no. 2:2007cv00447, IP Innovation, LLC et al v. Red Hat Inc. et al, in Texas. Where else? The patent troll magnet state.

How to install Ubuntu Linux 7.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworld.com.au: You can download a complete version of Ubuntu Linux from the Ubuntu website. The ISO (or CD) image is around 700MB. Two versions of Ubuntu are supported: 6.06 and 7.04 -- we're using 7.04 for this walkthrough. To follow suit, select Desktop Edition, Ubuntu 7.04.

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More in Tux Machines

ROSA Fresh R9

ROSA is a desktop distribution that was originally forked from Mandriva Linux, but now is independently developed. While the company which produces ROSA is based in Russia, the distribution includes complete translations for multiple languages. The ROSA desktop distribution is designed to be easy to use and includes a range of popular applications and multimedia support. ROSA R9 is available in two editions, one featuring the KDE 4 desktop and the second featuring the KDE Plasma 5 desktop. These editions are scheduled to receive four years of support and security updates. I decided to download the Plasma edition of ROSA R9 and found the installation media to be approximately 2GB in size. Booting from the ROSA disc brings up a menu asking if we would like to load the distribution's live desktop environment or begin the installation process. Taking the live option brings up a graphical wizard that asks us a few questions. We are asked to select our preferred language from a list and accept the project's warranty and license. We are then asked to select our time zone and keyboard layout from lists. With these steps completed, the wizard disappears and the Plasma 5.9 desktop loads. Read more

More of today's howtos

Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot

  • Linfo – Shows Linux Server Health Status in Real-Time
    Linfo is a free and open source, cross-platform server statistics UI/library which displays a great deal of system information. It is extensible, easy-to-use (via composer) PHP5 library to get extensive system statistics programmatically from your PHP application. It’s a Ncurses CLI view of Web UI, which works in Linux, Windows, *BSD, Darwin/Mac OSX, Solaris, and Minix.
  • 2 tag management tools for organizing your music library
    These days, EasyTag seems to be my go-to tag editor. While I can't claim to have tried them all, I have mostly stopped looking now that I have this one. Generally speaking, I like its three-panel layout: file system directory on the left; selected tracks in the middle, showing file name and tags; and specific tags and cover image on the right.
  • New Simple Scan Designs Emerge; Seeking Devs to Implement Them
    Simple Scan is one of my personal favourite and perhaps even one of the "essential" apps on the Linux desktop for me. It does what it says on the tin: it's simple and it scans, with a nice preview system and enough options to be decently functional. Some new designs for the app have emerged and they are looking quite nice indeed. GNOME UX designer and Red Hat Desktop Team Member, Allan Day, showed the new mockup designs off in his blog post. Simple Scan has a pretty sparse and simplistic interface already, and I mean that in a positive way, but Allan believes that "just because it's great, doesn't mean it can't be improved" and that most of the improvements are simply "refinements", rather than major overhauls, in order to make some of the app's functions a bit easier to discover and navigate.
  • Albert – A Fast, Lightweight and Flexible Application Launcher for Linux
    A while ago, we have written about Ulauncher which is used to launch application quickly. Today we came up with similar kind of utility called Albert which is doing the same job and have some additional unique features which is not there in ulauncher.
  • 5 Tricks To Get More Out Of VLC Player In Linux
    In fact, for the desktop, VLC is much more than just a tool to play videos stored on your hard drive! So, stay with me for a tour of the lesser known features of that great software.
  • 5 of the Best Linux Remote Desktop Apps to Remotely Access a Computer
    Remote desktop apps are a very useful group of apps because they allow access to a computer anywhere in the world. While the simplest way to do this is via a terminal, if you don’t want to have to type commands but rather want a more advanced way to access a remote computer, here are five of the best remote desktop apps for Linux.
  • Frogr 1.3 released
  • Brisk Menu 0.4.0 Is Out with Super Key Support, Adapts to Vertical Panel Layouts
    Solus Project founder and lead developer Ikey Doherty is today announcing the release and immediate availability of the Brisk Menu 0.4.0 application menu for Solus and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.
  • OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements
    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced

I haven't done any extensive testing, but then, how much testing is really needed to run a bunch of Web apps. The whole idea is to have this cloud-based operating system, with easy, flexible access to your data anywhere you go. So if you judge this from the perspective of a typical desktop, you miss the point. But that is the point. When I install something on a desktop-like form factor, I expect its behavior to match. CloudReady takes you away from that experience, and the transition is not comfortable. You feel very limited. This makes a lot of sense for schools, for instance, where you do want to lock down the devices, and make them simple for reuse. In a home setup, why would you go for just cloud, when you can have that plus any which desktop application on a typical system? After all, nothing prevents you from launching a browser and using Google applications, side by side with your desktop stuff. It's the same thing. The notion of reviving old hardware is a bit of a wishful thinking. My eeePC test shows that it gets completely crippled when you run HD content in either Firefox or Chrome. An operating system based on Chromium OS will not drastically change that. It cannot do that. Maybe you will have better performance than having Windows there, the same way I opted for a Linux setup on the Asus netbook, but there are physical limits to what old hardware can accomplish. And then, there's the whole question of cloud ... Most people might be comfy with this, after having used smartphones for a while, but I don't think this is anything novel or mindblowing. CloudReady works as advertised, it's a very cool concept, but ultimately, it gives you a browser on steroids. Google and Neverware have their own agenda for doing this, but for home users, there really isn't any added value in transforming their keyboard-and-mouse box into a browsing portal. So if you ask me, am I ready for the cloud, the answer is, only when it becomes sophisticated enough to match my productivity and freedom of creativity. And for you, do you want a simple, locked down, secure and entirely Google machine that isn't a mobile phone or a dedicated piece of hardware? The answer is 42. Read more