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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 5 to get major social media srlinuxx 04/04/2011 - 4:17pm
Story ubuntu 11.10 Won't Ship with Classic GNOME srlinuxx 1 04/04/2011 - 4:08pm
Story Poking at Pinguy 10.10.1 srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 8:45pm
Story 5 Reasons Why Linux Is The Future Of Technology srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 8:42pm
Story The Stalwart HP 2133 Mini-Note srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 7:05pm
Story The Perfect Desktop - OpenSUSE 11.4 (GNOME) falko 03/04/2011 - 6:46pm
Story How to get a career in open source srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 3:59pm
Story 4 Lessons Which Bodhi Linux Taught Me srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 3:57pm
Story Ubuntu Wallpaper Collection Series 2 srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 3:55pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/04/2011 - 2:26am

Raster image editors: A comparative look at the GIMP and Krita

Filed under
Software

With the release of Krita 1.6, it seems like a good time to compare the two big raster image editors for Linux. Coming as they do from the divergent GTK+ and KDE programming camps, it can be hard to assess the differences between the GIMP and Krita without being swayed by politics and emotion. Let's take a cold, hard look at the two, and compare the features side by side.

Explosions Reported at Building Housing PayPal

Filed under
Web

San Jose firefighters Tuesday night responded to reports of explosions from within a four-story building in San Jose that has also drawn responses from a bomb squad and a hazardous materials team.

Mark Shuttleworth: Consistent Packaging

Filed under
Ubuntu

A long, long time ago, packaging was an exciting idea. There were disputes over style and process, there was innovation. There were reasons to prefer .deb over .rpm over emerge and it’s binary packages…

Jono Bacon: Community Specs at the Ubuntu Developer Summit

Filed under
Ubuntu

On Saturday I fly out to San Francisco with Scott James Remnant for the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS). As many of you will know, a bunch of specs have been suggested for the UDS. These are the specs:

How To Install VMware Server On Debian Sarge

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.1) on a Debian Sarge system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. In this article we use Debian Sarge (3.1) as the host operating system.

OpenBSD 4.0 Review

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

In an era when the next edition of Microsoft Windows is pushed back more than a year, and popular GNU/Linux distributions are almost expected to have their release dates delayed by weeks or months, it's nice to know that at least one operating system releases on schedule without all kinds of showstopping bugs and problems. OpenBSD 4.0 was released on November 1 with its usual mix of new hardware support and enhanced operating system features.

Debian Weekly News - October 31st, 2006

Filed under
Linux

The Debian Weekly News seems to be back in business. Today they published this years 40th issue. I hope this doesn't mean the end of Ben's Debian Weekly Nudes, but nevertheless, here's a link to this week's official Debian Weekly newsletter.

PCLinuxOS Magazine November 2006 Issue 3 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the November 2006 issue is available for download!

Open Source Will Never Die

Filed under
OSS

No matter how hard people or companies like SCO try, nor how muchothers believe they know the commercial market, open source will never die.

LDAP Series Part IV - Installing OpenLDAP on Debian

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HowTos

I can imagine the comments we'll see on this article. What about X distribution? And so on... I'm not going to justify my reasons for choosing Debian. You can use whatever distro you want. It's just a matter of preference.

Will Oracle's 'Standardization' Offset Linux Fragmentation?

Filed under
Linux

While Oracle's moves to provide enterprise-level support around Red Hat Linux are stirring up controversy, the vendor's decision to join the Free Standards Group (FSG), also unveiled last week, is capturing less attention. Yet is it possible that Oracle's newly minted membership in the standards group might actually help to dispel industry fragmentation?

Picture your disk space with 3-D filesystem browsers

Filed under
Software

You don't need a Ph.D. in scientific visualization to have some fun with three-dimensional data. Whether you're searching for an unused nook in a cramped disk partition, or trying to find the bloated temp/ folder that's crashing your system, sometimes the flat folder view of a traditional GUI file browser is little help. Luckily, Linux offers a variety of 3-D filesystem that can make your disk usage statistics come alive.

Quake 3 on Ubuntu Edgy x86_64

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu
HowTos

Installing Quake III Arena on a 64-bit Linux box isn't that bad actually. I couldn't find instructions anywhere on how to do this, so after figuring it out I'm writing them down here.

ATI 8.30.3 Display Drivers

Filed under
Reviews

There have been a swirl of speculations as to whether AMD will open-source the ATI Linux fglrx display drivers, and today the first display driver (8.30.3) is being pushed out after the completion of the ATI and AMD acquisition. But are these drivers still closed-source? Has any new information hit the wire about these rumors? We have the ATI fglrx 8.30.3 display drivers in our hands today to tell you all of the details.

Fedora Core 6 Innovates Unabated

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

In its first five releases, Red Hat's Fedora Core has represented the Linux technology vanguard. And so it is with Fedora Core 6. The fast-moving Red Hat distribution polishes SELinux, adds new tools and improves performance.

Why Gaming Sucks On Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Despite last week's article about running World of Warcraft on Linux with CodeWeavers' CrossOver, I can't help but feel a sense of despair when I think of gaming under Linux. It seems that over the last few years, with a few exceptions, things have gotten worse rather than better. Frankly, I've had it with gaming under Linux. It's not worth the time or the effort.

How to install Linux on an eMac

Filed under
HowTos

Why replace Mac OS X with Linux on an Apple eMac? I did it to revive an aging hardware platform and provide a computer to a friend. Here's how I replaced "Tiger" (OS X 10.1) first with Debian, then Ubuntu.

The unimportance of Linux OS and why you don't care

Filed under
Linux

As we now all know, Oracle is planning their own Linux. This is causing general hand wringing and dire predictions of doom. Market fragmentation? The Linux market is already fragmented and has been for some time.

What's wrong with software patents?

Filed under
OSS

I know that many people come to the FFII—as I did—because they feel a deep sense of injustice at how the smaller players in IT are consistently squashed by special interests and monopolists. But I’m going to look at our core concern—software patents—from a different angle, one based more on economics and less on emotions.

Making Ubuntu even simpler for newbies

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

After looking at most GNU/Linux distributions, author Rickford Grant finally settled on Ubuntu. Grant is the authour of Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks. Grant tells Frederick Noronha why he chose Ubuntu, what the book holds, and what the challenges were in writing it.

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More in Tux Machines

How To Build A Raspberry Pi Smartwatch — The Geekiest Watch Ever Made

In our Getting Started With Raspberry Pi series, we’ve introduced you to the basics of Pi, told you how to get everything you need, and help you boot a basic operating system. But, Raspberry Pi is much more than that. You can use it as a TOR proxy router, build your own PiPhone, and even install Windows 10 IoT. This little device comes with lots of flexibility, that allows it to be used in multiple applications. Well, did you ever think about wearing your Raspberry Pi? If your answer is NO, I won’t be surprised. If you imagine a scenario where Raspberry Pi is used to build a smartwatch, it would look too bulky. Well, that’s the thing about making geeky things that set you apart from the regular crowd, right? Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 Released
  • Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Alpha 2 Released
    Today marks the second alpha release for Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" flavors participating in these early development releases. Participating in today's Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 development milestone are Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Kylin. No Xubuntu or Kubuntu releases to report on this morning.
  • PSA: Ubuntu 15.10 Hits End of Life Today
    It's time to wave a weary goodbye to the Wily Werewolf, as Ubuntu 15.10 support ends today.
  • Jono Bacon on Life After (and Before) GitHub
    Do you want to know what it takes to be a professional community manager? This interview will show you the kind of personality that does well at it, and how Jono Bacon, one of the world’s finest community managers, discovered Linux and later found his way into community management. Bacon is world-famous as the long-time community manager for Ubuntu. He was so good, I sometimes think his mother sang “you’ll be a community manager by and by” to him when he was a baby. In 2014 he went to XPRIZE, not a FOSS company, but important nevertheless. From there he dove back into FOSS as community manager for GitHub. Now Bacon is a freelance, self-employed community manager. One of his major clients is HackerOne, whose CEO is Bacon’s and my mutual friend Mårten Mickos. But HackerOne is far from his only client. In the interview he says he recently got back from visiting a client in China, and that he has more work then he can handle.

I've been Linuxing since before you were born

Once upon a time, there was no Linux. No, really! It did not exist. It was not like today, with Linux everywhere. There were multiple flavors of Unix, there was Apple, and there was Microsoft Windows. When it comes to Windows, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Despite adding 20+ gigabytes of gosh-knows-what, Windows is mostly the same. (Except you can't drop to a DOS prompt to get actual work done.) Hey, who remembers Gorilla.bas, the exploding banana game that came in DOS? Fun times! The Internet never forgets, and you can play a Flash version on Kongregate.com. Apple changed, evolving from a friendly system that encouraged hacking to a sleek, sealed box that you are not supposed to open, and that dictates what hardware interfaces you are allowed to use. 1998: no more floppy disk. 2012: no more optical drive. The 12-inch MacBook has only a single USB Type-C port that supplies power, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, external storage, video output, and accessories. If you want to plug in more than one thing at a time and don't want to tote a herd of dongles and adapters around with you, too bad. Next up: The headphone jack. Yes, the one remaining non-proprietary standard hardware port in Apple-land is doomed. Read more