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Saturday, 28 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Interview with Novell's John Dragoon

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Interviews

SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 10 is finally here, and so begins Novell's effort to get it onto as many business computers as possible. This event also comes shortly after the departure of Jack Messman as CEO, an event which has dramatically changed Novell's business strategy, especially as it relates to its SUSE Linux products. To find out more about SLED, its cousin SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), and the company's plans for the future, I got in touch with senior Novell executive John Dragoon.

Getting started with dynamic DNS

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HowTos

Your ISP probably assigns your computer an IP address dynamically. It means one less thing for the both of you to think about, but it also puts you in a bind if you need to connect to your machine from the outside: you can't locate your PC amidst those of all the ISP's other customers. To overcome this obstacle, you can use dynamic DNS. Here's how to get started.

Croatian government adopts free software policy

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OSS

THE CROATIAN government has decided to adopt a free software policy and move entirely to Open Source.

Novell Ditches JBoss as It Launches SUSE Linux Enterprise 10

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SUSE

Novell Inc appears to have ditched the JBoss application server from its SUSE Linux Enterprise distribution following the acquisition of the open source application server vendor by Red Hat Inc.

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Introducing the Open Graphics Project

One project that I’ve been following quite closely lately is a project started by chip-designer Timothy Miller, called the Open Graphics Project. His goal, along with the rest of the project, known as the “Open Graphics Foundation” is to make a 3D accelerated video card which is fully documented, free-licensed, and open source.

Ubuntu 6.06 Is Current Desktop Linux Champ

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Ubuntu

Canonical's Ubuntu 6.06 LTS is an excellent Linux-based operating system—so excellent, in fact, that it not only earned eWEEK Labs' Analyst's Choice designation but has also become our clear favorite among Linux desktop distributions.

Where Linux is hot, and where it's not

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Linux

Do you think you know, I mean really know, where Linux is popular and where it's not? I did, and you know what? I was wrong. I found out, thanks to a new feature from Google: Google Trends.

Dreamlinux 2.0 XGL Edition

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Linux
Reviews
-s

Dreamlinux 2.0 Works was released on July 16 and this time there's a kicker. This time it's available in an XGL edition. Where they may not be the first to put out an XGL edition, I believe they are the first provide the advanced effects for the xfce4 destkop. Having already been quite impress with Dreamlinux in previous testing, Tuxmachines just had to check that out.

Planeshift 0.3.015 Released!

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Gaming

A new version of the MMORPG Planeshift has just been released. An official linux client is now available from the download page.

Securing Your Asterisk Server, Part 1

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HowTos

If you're using Asterisk for your voice over IP needs, you'll need to lock down your Asterisk server, and that begins with secure passwords.

GPL 3 Draft Revives License Debate

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OSS

The topic of licensing might not be the sexiest thing about the free and open-source software industry. But it is one of the most important issues, since the license governs exactly what companies and developers can and cannot do with their software.

Google Hacking Malicious Code

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Google

Security researcher H.D. Moore has released a new malware search engine and its underlying code to help searchers find malware code that Google has indexed. But Google isn't exactly happy about it.

Should You Release Your Code as Open Source?

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OSS

The first thing to keep in mind is that open source does not mean "free." You can open source your software without giving it away for free; how you do so depends on the license you choose, which I'll discuss in the section "Common Issues" later in this article.

HP Has Got Novell's Back

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SUSE

With the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 10, Novell has a mighty big ally backing it up in the form of Hewlett-Packard. The IT giant, currently riding a wave of renewed momentum, has thrown its support behind SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and Server, both released Monday.

How Debian Dissapointed Me

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Linux

No, I'll probably not stop using Debian GNU/Linux, at least not right now. But they have disappointed me. A lot.

Kerio Mail Server Spam Filtering

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Software

Kerio Mail Server has several configuration options to protect against spam email. For maximum protection, you should investigate and set all appropriate items. Under the Security Options tab for the SMTP server are several limits and controls you can set.

The GNU "Lesser" General Public License gets some love

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OSS

With the introduction of the GNU GPLv3, the GNU Lesser General Public License (L-GPL) has seen much less attention. This has changed with the recent GPLv3 conference in Barcelona, and I think it has changed for the better.

Upgrade from Edubuntu Breezy to Dapper

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Ubuntu

Instead of doing a preferred clean install as i usually do, while browsing the kubuntu website i noticed it's possible to do an upgrade and it didn't seem complicated and time consuming.

Ease logfile monitoring with swatch

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HowTos

If monitoring log files has become too much to manage, there is a simple tool called swatch that will help you get a handle on the most important log information. Vincent Danen tells you how to set up swatch.

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UbuCon Paris Party Starts Today In Celebration of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Release

Yesterday we reported on the fact that even if Canonical unveiled the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system last month, on April 21, several LoCos are still organizing release parties. Read more

Why I won’t use Dropbox’s Project Infinite if it’s not open source

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Open-source vs. Proprietary – Keeping Ideology Out of the Equation

Open-source really means no more and no less than making the source code readily available to anyone. Thus, open-source makes no statement as to the licensing conditions for using the software, whether there are charges for using the software, whether the software is supported, or actively developed, or any good, and so on. Closed-source means that source code is not readily available, but makes no comment on issues like licensing, costs, support, and quality. Read more

NetOS Enterprise Linux 8 Promises to Be a Worthy Alternative to Chrome OS

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