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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Is Open Source Easier Than Commercial Software? srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 11:40pm
Story Canonical CEO: Ubuntu tablet OS will battle Android, iOS srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 11:31pm
Story Linux 3.2 Kernel Benchmarks srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 10:43pm
Story Music Management Takes Flight With Songbird srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 10:42pm
Story January 2012 Issue Of The PCLOS Magazine Released srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 10:39pm
Story News In Linux Audio srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 10:35pm
Story You made a mistake, your noob! srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 10:16pm
Story A First Look at New Ubuntu Laptops and PCs from CTL srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 8:18pm
Story The Mystery of KDE Activities srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 8:13pm
Story HealthCheck: Linux Mint srlinuxx 11/01/2012 - 8:04pm

Ubuntu 7.04 arrives Thursday

Filed under
Ubuntu

For Linux business users, the most important Linux release of 2007 so far is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. But for most other Linux fans, the upcoming release of Ubuntu Version 7.04 on April 19 demands more attention.

Ubuntu's 'feisty' spin on virtualization

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu version of Linux is getting more virtualization-friendly, but in a different way than its top rivals.

Ubuntu's 'feisty' spin on virtualization The Ubuntu version of Linux is getting more virtualization-friendly, but in a different way than its top rivals.

bash shell script: copy only files modifed after specified date

Filed under
HowTos

I’ve mentioned a few times lately that I’m working on my backup plan for GNU/Linux. I started by looking at great free software tools like Samba’s rsync and GNU Tar, and I don’t think I need to look much further than them. There is also GNU Cpio, which I haven’t really investigated yet.

DD-WRT: Setting up a home Wireless Distribution System (WDS)

Filed under
HowTos

I’ve been a fan of the DD-WRT router firmware for some time. I’ve even done a couple of post about installing and upgrading a Linksys WRT54G with DD-WRT firmware. DD-WRT firmware runs on a number of wireless Linux based routers and provides capabilities far beyond factory firmware, such as VOIP, VPN and advanced traffic control.

Justifying the use of FOSS

Filed under
OSS

Statistics are often the refuge of scoundrels but occasionally they can mean something. A case in point is the paper drafted by David A. Wheeler to advance a simple argument for the use of free and open source software.

Ubuntu full circle mag - issue #0

Filed under
Ubuntu

Issue #0 is now available for download! This is just a preview issue of whats to come. It contains:

History of Ubuntu - from Warty to Feisty and
Ubuntu 7.04 - Feisty Fawn's New Features

Over two weeks in the making...

Look for Issue #1 towards the end of May.

More Here.

My Experience With openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
SUSE

So my latest endevour has been to find a linux alternative to my standard MS Windows XP Pro installation and I think I found it with openSUSE 10.2. While my linux administration skills are by far greater than they were a year ago, I still know I've got a ton of room to go in terms of every day linux functionality.

My Feisty regressions, what are yours?

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’m currently running the development version of Ubuntu, codenamed Feisty. The final version was planned to be released on April 19th, but this might change since the RC has already been postponed.

There seems to be no official announcement what exactly causes the delay, but I have some ideas, because there are some problems I’m currently experiencing myself:

Battle for Wesnoth 1.2.4

Filed under
Gaming

Version 1.2.4 of Battle for Wesnoth, a GPL'ed fantasy-themed turn-based strategy game, was released today. This is a maintenance release that fixes somes bugs with saved games and tSG should be playable again.

Changelog includes:

Version 1.2.4:
* campaigns:

How to pronounce Linux ?

Filed under
Linux

My friend once asked me how you pronounce the word Linux. While I have heard the way it is pronounced from the mouths of numerous Linux users to be certain how you correctly pronounce it, I have felt it would be nice to hear it being pronounced by the father of Linux himself - Linus Torvalds.

What’s his beef with Linux?

Filed under
Linux

“What’s his beef with Linux?” I can imagine some people wonder if I have something against Linux. The first two contributions to Digiplace.nl were quite critical in tone. Well, to clarify one thing: I have nothing against Linux. On the contrary, I would take any opportunity to promote Linux among Windows users.

Tutorial - ~ Ubuntu Guide

Filed under
HowTos

This is my guide on how to install ubuntu on a partioned Hard Drive or another Hard Drive.

First, you will need the ubuntu LiveCD, available here>>
http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download

get the version that best fits your computer and your needs.

Here we will emphasize on Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft.

KDE vs. GNOME: Is One Better?

Filed under
KDE

One of the hardest things for users of other platform to understand is that GNU/Linux does not have a single graphical display. Instead, there are dozens, ranging from basic window managers that control the look and positioning of windows in the X Window system, to complete desktop environments with a wide variety of utilities and specially designed applications.

Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

I would take a break from the regular broadband bashing and instead focus on the new imminent release of Ubuntu Linux, code named as Feisty Fawn. With cutting edge software, Ubuntu’s version promises to be better than ever before by incorporating huge support for Wireless networking cards, on demand installation of codecs and Windows migration tools.

terminal drag and drop

Filed under
HowTos

this is a bit of a trick I stumbled across a few days ago. Konsole, the kde terminal application allows you to drag and drop files into it. When you drop the file, you can do a number of useful things with it. This is a very quick howto, highlighting this feature.

SO HOW DOES IT WORK?

Getting started with GnuPG

Filed under
HowTos

In this article I'll help you get started with GnuPG, the GNU Privacy Guard. Instead of writing another GnuPG manual, I'll teach you how to generate your first keypair, sign/verify files and encrypt/decrypt files.

If you don't know what GnuPG is, this description from the official website will clear things up for you.

The sorry state of open source today

Filed under
OSS

I have been using open source software since the beginning of 1995. It was about Linux (starting with Slackware, after an initial apprenticeship with SLS), then some FreeBSD and NetBSD, to continue with several Linux distributions. What a choice!

Free software rules, ok?

Filed under
OSS

Chris Cornish is not your typical teenager. While other young people are finishing high school and hanging out with friends, 16-year-old Cornish is the systems administrator for a national Internet service provider (ISP) and network integrator, Perth-based Corporate IT Centre.

Penguin At The Window: Linux As An Alternative To Vista

Filed under
Linux

One thing must be said from the start: Microsoft Vista is a modern operating system that offers a variety of genuine improvements over Windows XP. On top of that, Vista also looks much spiffier than its predecessor. Even so, there are a variety of reasons not to blindly reach for Vista. A consideration of the alternatives is in order, and Linux is at the top of the list.

Getting Started with Ghost4Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Ghost is a popular software in the Windows world for creating full backups of your PCs contents and helps in restoring individual files or the entire hard drive. One of the popular ways of archiving or creating images of Linux filesystems is to use liveCD distributions and tarring the entire contents.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.