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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Come2Linux Expo - My Trip Report

Filed under
KDE

This weekend a KDE delegation attended the Come2Linux expo in Essen, a city in western Germany. I was one of the KDE booth babes, along with Harald (from Austria), Carsten (Germany), Eckhart (Germany), and Benoit (France).

Round 5 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Filed under
Linux

Those itching to get their hands on Red Hat's next version of Enterprise Linux now have a chance. Red Hat's community of enterprise users is now testing Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5 Beta 1, code-named Tikanga.

Self-reviews: OPENLAB 4.Z BETA

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Atang1, one of the nice guys over at tuxmachines asked me once more to do my own review of the newest OpenLab release. A repeated honour which I am happy to oblige.

Game reverse-engineering Wiki

Filed under
Gaming

Michael aka. Darkstar let us know that he recently set up a small Wiki which focuses on reverse-engineering of (old) games. So far, they don't have a lot of information, but lets hope that it will change soon.

Is Software Preventing You From Switching?

Why do you keep using the operating system that you're using right now? I'm sure that you have a number of answers to that question, and they're going to be different for each user. Some people may like the visual appeal, the hardware support, the simplicity, or anything else for that matter. No answer is wrong, because the connection that you make with the OS is unique, and sometimes unexplainable.

Setting up Subversion and websvn on Debian

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This howto will illustrate a way to install and configure Subversion and websvn on a Debian server. With Subversion you have a powerful version control system for your software development, and websvn is an easy-to-use webinterface to your SVN repositories written in PHP.

Best Open Source CMS Final Five Announced!

After six weeks and registering almost twelve thousand nominations, the Open Source CMS Award finalists have been revealed.

Get your network's weather from Weathermap4RRD

Filed under
Software

When I was investigating the Abilene/Internet2 network sometime back, I found its "network weather map," which graphically shows the load on network segments, to be an interesting tool. I thought something similar could be helpful on our network. Today, we're using Weathermap4RRD to show a high-level graphical representation of our network.

Book Review : Beginning Google Maps Applications with PHP and Ajax

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Reviews

Ask me what is one of the most useful feature on the net which will remain popular for times immemorial, come what may, and I will without an iota of doubt tell you that it is maps. A one of a kind book I have come across in recent times is the Google Maps Applications with PHP and Ajax from Novice to Professional.

Linux Newbies - Finding your way around your hard drive

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HowTos

So you’ve got yourself a fancy Linux install now and you want to know a bit more about your hard drive? Here are a few simple commands that can show you what you have, and where it is.

ComputerWorld Gets OSS Mud on its Face?

Filed under
OSS

Articles like this one are so misguided. ComputerWorld shows mud on its face while pretending they're subject matter experts. I'll show you below how this article was written by a ignorant journalist.

The Challenges of Open Source in Non-Profits

Filed under
OSS

Open source seems to present a number of obstacles to those making technical purchasing decisions in those businesses that are classified non-profit. The interesting facet of this discussion, however, is that the same business needs exist in not-for-profit institutions as it does in for-profit ones. This article attempts to survey some of those issues facing open source in the not-for-profit sector of the business world.

Half a century of hard drives

Filed under
Hardware

Hard drives radically changed the way the world stores data. Hard drives have come a long way since debuting 50 years ago this week. Do they still have room to shrink?

Debian Etch is not ready for release

Filed under
Linux

I'm scared by Debian etch. It'll probably become the worst Debian release ever. It's going to hurt our reputation.

Mark Shuttleworth: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth is polishing his image: Reuter's has a story which says «Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft», and Mark's own blog addresses the Debian/Ubuntu conflictual relationship: «Conflicting goals create tension in communities». I couldn't possibly trust these sayings.

Moving to freedom, one step at a time

Filed under
Linux

Time to get on with the move. Giving up Windows is like kicking a drug habit. It’s easier to take the path of least resistance and keep using. If quitting proprietary software was a twelve step program—although, let’s not push the analogy too far.

Debian Etch Beta3 Graphical-mode installation With screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Etch is the codename for the upcoming release of Debian, which will also be known as Debian GNU/Linux 4.0. Etch has been the testing “release” of the Debian distribution since the release of the current stable version, 3.1 (codenamed Sarge), on June 6th 2005. The project is currently aiming at a December 4 2006 release date.I have created easy debian etch installation process with nearly 50 images.You need to click on thumbnail image to view full image size.

Xgl and Compiz bling for Dapper

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

By now, if you haven't seen Compiz and Xgl in action, you probably have heard of it. You may even be wanting to set it up yourself. If so, this guide is here for you.

Embracing Unix and Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

Unix and Linux clients can do quite well on a Windows network. Microsoft, in fact, released its own Services for Unix, which provides some basic cross-compatibility features for Unix clients accessing Windows servers. Other, more robust interoperability solutions are also available for various network services. Fortunately, Unix has been using TCP/IP for longer than Windows, so the two operating systems at least have a networking protocol in common.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Releases New Kernel Update for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

We reported the other day that Canonical released a major kernel update for its Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, and it appears that it also affected users of the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) distribution. Read more

This programmable, open source outlet can do things that off-the-shelf smart plugs can't

Excited by the idea of an open-source, Arduino-based outlet, capable of remotely controlling your various household devices? If so, you’ll definitely want to check out the Portlet: a versatile portmanteau of “portable” and “outlet,” which — despite only consisting of 4 buttons and a simple 2×15 character LCD screen — can be programmed to do everything from switching your lights on at a certain time to keeping your coffee heated at the perfect temperature. Read more

How I welcomed an immigrant family with a Linux laptop

From the LibriVox website, I downloaded the free, public domain audio reading of Helen Keller’s amazing autobiography, The Story of My Life, which is an excellent book that was first published in 1903. Then, I downloaded the text of the book (it's in the public domain) from Project Gutenberg and imported the text into Calibre, the free ebook reading software. Using my favorite Linux screencasting software, SimpleScreenRecorder, I married the text (in a large font) to the audio recording. I created the first 11 chapters of the book as video files in this way, and uploaded them to YouTube. I also copied these onto the Dell Inspiron 9400, so these video files could be viewed offline. Read more

Linux Practicality vs Activism

One of the greatest things about running Linux is the freedom it provides. Where the division among the Linux community appears is in how we value this freedom. For some, the freedom enjoyed by using Linux is the freedom from vendor lock-in or high software costs. Most would call this a practical consideration. Others users would tell you the freedom they enjoy is software freedom. This means embracing Linux distributions that support the Free Software Movement, avoiding proprietary software completely and all things related. Read more