Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story First handheld Steam Machine revealed Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:39pm
Story Tails interview Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:32pm
Story Debian 6 Gets LTS Support That Will End in February 2016 Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:27pm
Story IFC6410 Snapdragon 600 dev board now supports Fedora, Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:23pm
Story DOCKBARX 0.91 RELEASED WITH BUG FIXES, BATTERY APPLET Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:19pm
Story LibreOffice 4.2.5 RC2 Is Available for Testing, Final Version to Arrive Soon Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:12pm
Story CONKY MANAGER GETS REVAMPED UI, NEW OPTIONS (CONKY GUI) Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 9:05pm
Story A warm welcome to CyanogenMod Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 8:57pm
Story 'Open source crucial for cutting edge industry' - South Korea ICT ministry Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 8:49pm
Story Leak reveals Galaxy S5 and S4 KitKat update coming this month Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2014 - 5:10pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • UBI File System

  • Installing Mozilla Prism on Ubuntu Gutsy
  • Creating graphs the old-fashioned way with Ploticus
  • Linux.com Weekly Wire with Lisa Hoover (Video) 3-28-08
  • HP Media Vault 2100 Linux Server Reviewed: One Kick-Ass Little Penguin
  • OLPC Nepal Pilot: Preparations
  • Should Gentoo Ditch the LiveCD?
  • Webcams that just work with Ubuntu Linux
  • How To Troubleshoot Wireless Network Connection in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron 8.04 Release Notes Rewritten in Plain English
  • Last Minute Vote Switching in OOXML Decision
  • RIP, gPC. Hello Zonbu!
  • OOo: Mail Merge Documents
  • Wash away the photo workflow blues with blueMarine
  • ASUS Eee PC desktop finally revealed?
  • Fedora 9 beta, Knoppix improvements
  • What is the free software community?

Mozilla Developer Reveals What Firefox 4 Holds in Store

Filed under
Moz/FF

dailytech.com: With the release of Firefox 3 imminent, the rest of the Firefox team is cooking up some crazy ideas for Firefox 4. Mozilla is pushing strongly for two very different new lines of research: Prism and Weave.

NVIDIA Quadro NVS 140M

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we took a look at the NVIDIA Quadro FX1700, which is one of NVIDIA's mid-range workstation graphics cards that boasts 512MB of video memory. Today we are looking at the NVIDIA Linux workstation performance once again but this time it's on the mobile front with the Quadro NVS 140M.

Linux wins PWN to OWN contest

Filed under
Linux

tippingpoint.com/blog: Yesterday, on day two of the contest, the MacBook Air was successfully compromised first. So at the end of the last day of the contest, only the Sony VAIO laptop running Ubuntu was left standing.

Watch out Red Hat, there's someone following you

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Red Hat has just released some remarkable results for the first US quarter. In a couple of years, it might find such achievements a mite harder to come by if the views of those who participated in a survey about open source recently are valid.

No Justification Need

Filed under
OSS

LinuxToday: What's at the forefront of my crabbiness is the almost-complete capture of the Open Source Business Conference's news cycle by Brad Smith's presence at that conference left me wondering who else was even there this week, other than Smith, Matt Asay, and a few pundits and luminaries.

The 10 Most Prophetic Sci-Fi Movies Ever

Filed under
Movies

popularmechanics.com: When Arthur C. Clarke died last week at the age of 90, science fiction—hell, science in general—lost one of its greatest, most forward-looking masters. In his honor, PM’s resident geek and sci-fi buff analyzes the most eerily predictive, prescient films of the future. They’re not necessarily the best movies—just the ones that got the science right, or will sometime soon.

Flipping the Linux switch: Enlightening experiences with window managers

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: Do you remember our youth? The good times we had, the games we played, and that great discussion we had about what makes a window manager different from a desktop environment? Then our relationship sort of got stuck on desktop environments.

Ulteo Application System Beta 1 - the FOSSwire review

Filed under
Linux

FOSSwire: Ulteo is an interesting concept. Rather than being just another Linux distribution, founder Gaël Duval (previously of Mandriva fame), wants to simplify the way you use your computer and your digital life. Apparently.

M$ stuff

Filed under
Microsoft
  • All That Got Stolen Was Microsoft's Thunder

  • Microsoft makes final heroic grab for OOXML votes
  • How Microsoft killed ODF
  • Microsoft OOXML standardization bid: The clock is ticking
  • Should Microsoft be afraid of Linux?

Linux destined for low-cost Intel Atom PCs?

Filed under
Linux

news.com (blog): Intel's low-cost Atom processors will be at the core of inexpensive PCs. And inexpensive computers these days often come with Linux. How do PC companies shave off the last hundred dollars or so to get to $299 or in some cases $199? Easy.

Why we still hate Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: I’m not trying to be political here. But what seems to upset most people about Hillary Clinton, and Bill Clinton for that matter, is this habit of parsing. Microsoft also likes to have it both ways. They want to be seen as cooperating with open source, but

Arch Linux: Popular KISS distro

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

hardware.no: Draco Linux and similar distributions, are often referred to as KISS-distributions (Keep It Simple, Stupid!). One of the most popular KISS distributions to date is called Arch Linux which, compared to Draco, has a much larger community and number of developers. To help us understand what make Arch Linux so great, we've asked the lead-developer - Aaron Griffin - some questions.

Aaron Seigo, KDE project lead speaks out

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

computerworlduk.com: Aaron Seigo joined the KDE project, which produces a free software desktop system for Linux and Unix platforms, in 2000 and is sponsored by Trolltech. Here he describes how porting KDE4 to Windows and MacOS will enable Kontact, the Open Source groupware application, to challenge the dominance of Microsoft Outlook in the enterprise.

Why Haven’t We Heard About Linux’s Growing Market Share?

Filed under
Linux

slashgear.com: Desktops starting with Dell have begun being sold with Linux pre-installed, almost all of the new UMPC Eee-like notebooks that are selling with Linux, and lots of new computers are getting SLED certified. It has me wondering why there hasn’t been a spike in Linux’s market share?

UltraEdit for Linux Coming?

Filed under
Software

linuxfud.wordpress: IDM’s UltraEdit is arguably the world’s best text editor…for Windows. I first used it in 2002 as part of a basic programming tool set provided by my client at the time. I was hooked. Alas, my conversion to Linux several years ago forced me to abandon UltraEdit. I check the UltraEdit user forums from time to time, and what did I see?

Opera Public Acid3 build

Filed under
Software

labs.opera.com: Two days ago Opera reached a 100/100 pass rate on the Acid3 test for the first time. I am pleased to announce the first public build with a 100/100 pass rate and pixel-perfect rendering!

SliTaz GNU/Linux, the Smallest “Desktop” Distro Ever Created

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: “At 25 MB, it has to be the smallest desktop distro ever created”. These were the words of Ladislav Bodnar in the most recent issue of Distrowatch Weekly when he announced this fresh and minuscule distribution as a new addition to the waiting list.

OOXML Today (so far)

Filed under
OSS
  • Poland confirms its approval for OOXML in ISO

  • Romania maintains OOXML approval
  • What Really Happened at the BRM for OOXML
  • Denmark changes OOXML vote to 'yes'

20 Linux Articles You Absolutely Must Read

Filed under
Linux

foogazi.com: We’ve all stumbled on those Linux articles that you read and either change your opinion on Linux or add to your understanding of Linux. Here is a list of what I believe are 20 Linux articles you definitely have to read if you call yourself a Linux user.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more