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About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Taiga, a new open source project management tool with focus on usability Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:17am
Story Android Wear Gets Its First Big Update Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 7:03am
Story Positive results from Outreach Program for Women Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:58am
Story Mesa 10.3.2 Has A Couple Bug-Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:47am
Story openSUSE Tumbling, Fedora Slipping, and Calculating Linux Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:37am
Story Ubuntu's shiny 10th birthday Unicorn: An upgrade fantasy Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2014 - 6:24am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 11:07pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 11:07pm
Story A victory for free software over the "Microsoft tax" Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 10:54pm
Story Cumulus Linux 2.5 adds mainstream L2 features to bare-metal switching Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 9:27pm

What Linux Needs to do to go Mainstream - Part 1

Filed under
Linux

itsuperhero.wordpress: The news from LinuxWorld got me psyched to check out Linux again to see what has changed in the year or so since I last experimented with the alternative OS. On a few occasions over the years, I’ve tried some various flavors of Linux. The things that have frustrated me the most about Linux are installing applications, hardware compatibility, and general usability of the OS. So what did I find this time around?

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu is already more attractive that osx

  • Ubuntu really is Linux for humans
  • Ubuntu Linux - Not Ready for Primetime

getdeb.net announces Playbuntu

Filed under
Linux

getdeb.net, a leading provider of new and updated programs for Ubuntu is announcing the start of a gaming repository for Ubuntu.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #103

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #103 for the week of August 3rd - August 9th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Intrepid Alpha-4 ahead, Ubuntu Studio looking for help, SRU needs you, and New Ubuntu Members.

Jono Bacon On Potential

Filed under
OSS

jonobacon.org: Regulars of this ‘ere blog will be familiar with my abundant love of all things community. The thing I find so exciting about community is the sheer potential it offers.

PHP 4 is dead, long live PHP 4

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: The 8th of August marked the end of life for PHP 4, which has been in stable release since May, 2000. With no further security patches to come for the technology, what options are there for those who can't or won't upgrade?

Best Application Ever

Filed under
Software

amarok.kde.org/blog: so the very kind folks who won the Akademy awards last year ( sebastian trueg, matthias kretz, danny allen ) decided to go ahead and award Amarok with the Best Application award! we are obviously very excited.

GIMP Save for Web plugin

Filed under
Linux

Save for Web allows to find compromise between minimal file size and acceptable quality of image quickly. While adjusting various settings, you may explore how image quality and file size change.

10 Coolest Devices Running Linux

Filed under
Linux

168hours.wordpress: Linux is not limited to just desktops. It’s far reaching, actually. Not that you’d have a Terminal app on it or anything, but you could. Are there any other cool devices out there running on Linux or Unix? Of course there are:

Qt 4.5 to Dramatically Improve QtWebKit and QGraphics

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: Video support, animations and transitions, optimisations to speed up painting and animations, and new graphical effects open up nearly endless new possibilities for developers to present their user interfaces with.

Free Software Essay

Filed under
OSS

jakeneumann.wordpress: Imagine a world in which computer software was free. Now, imagine a world where software can be modified in whatever way the user desires. This is the world of free software. Free software was designed to give people freedom in choice for the software that they used, and freedom to do what they wanted to with it.

Getting involved with GNOME

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Software

jaysonrowe.wordpress: Many people get started “giving back” to the Linux community by getting involved in the community surrounding the distro that they use. However, another great way to get involved is by contributing to the Desktop Environment that you or your distro use.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Setting up a DHCP server on Ubuntu Hardy Heron

  • How to compile your own linux kernel for openSUSE
  • Accessing Linux Partitions from Windows
  • Configuring WPA2 (AES) in Slackware
  • Richard Stallman inspects my computer

Impressions: gOS 3 Gadgets BETA

Filed under
Linux

justplaintech.com: I thought gOS would be good, solely based on the fact its built off of Ubuntu, which is great. After testing gOS I realize it’s even better than i had expected. Read on after the jump to find out more.

More On GEM & Intel's Next Driver

phoronix.com: The xf86-video-intel 2.4 driver was just released about three weeks ago, but we're already well into the xf86-video-intel 2.5 development cycle, which will be Intel's next quarterly graphics driver release. Intel's Jesse Barnes has provided a brief status on the code mergers taking place for this next open-source release.

KDE Akademy 2008

Filed under
KDE
  • Akademy 2008 - Day 1

  • Letter from Akademy
  • how to survive akademy

My Linux Anniversary - 1 Year Later . . .

Filed under
Linux

sharplinux.blogspot: Well, it has been a year since I took the plunge and installed Debian on my parents' old desktop, and my what a year it has been! One year ago I was a reference librarian at a busy suburban library who found a book about Linux and decided to try out Knoppix for the first time.

Review: OpenArena 0.8.0

Filed under
Gaming

headshotgamer.com: Being such a new version, you might not be seeing this in Ubuntu 8.10, Mandriva 2009, Fedora 10 or Suse 11.1 – unless they update their repos quick smart. All is not lost however, as it's a quick download without the need to compile anything, as you run the game from the directory choosing either the x86 or the x86-64 runtime.

5 Useless Compiz Fusion Effects

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: Compiz Fusion is the best thing that happened to Linux desktop user experience yet. In the world of Linux bashers who argue that Linux is not quite ready for home users; compiz is one of the few things that really set Linux apart from other OS with major market share. Still I feel we need to make a list of “WTF, why would anyone want to use this?” effects with Compiz Fusion.

How To Set Up WebDAV With Lighttpd On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

his guide explains how to set up WebDAV with lighttpd on a Debian Etch server. WebDAV stands for Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning and is a set of extensions to the HTTP protocol that allow users to directly edit files on the lighttpd server so that they do not need to be downloaded/uploaded via FTP. Of course, WebDAV can also be used to upload and download files.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: Audacity, Geary, GNOME Photos, Business Apps, Mir, Nix, KubeVirt, Top Projects and Apoxi

  • Audacity 2.2.2 Released with a Stack of New Features & Improvements
    This update also builds upon the major changes introduced in the release of Audacity 2.2.0 last year, as well that of the minor 2.2.1 update earlier this year.
  • Geary Email Client Mails Out a Bug Fix Update
    A new version of the Geary email client for Linux desktops is available to download. Although a (relative) minor update when compared to the huge Geary 0.12 release last year, Geary 0.12.1 is worthwhile. The update solves a stack of crashes and server compatibility issues, while also updating translations in the interface and user manual to ensure as many people can use Geary as possible.
  • GNOME Photos – An Elegant Alternative for Organizing and Sharing Photos
    How many GNU/Linux photo managers do you know have a beautiful UI for browsing photos and organizing them into collections coupled with inbuilt editing tools and cloud integration? This one goes by the name of GNOME Photos. GNOME Photos is a simple and yet elegant photo management app with which you can organize, share, and intuitively edit your photos on your Linux workstation. It features a file manager-like environment for easy navigation and cloud integration via GNOME Online Accounts.
  • Linux Means Business – Best Free Business Apps
    Let’s deal with the issue of cost up front. Every single application featured in this article is available to download without payment. This, in itself, helps to keep IT costs within a tight budget. And cost can be a very important driver when seeking an IT solution for firms – particularly for freelancers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, small businesses, and educational establishments. Naturally, these types of people and organizations will have some sort of IT budget. From a business perspective, open source business applications won’t necessarily be zero cost. Using unfamiliar software entails training costs for a firm — the costs are not limited to time itself. And then there’s the expense of obtaining support for the software, or even hiring development time to customize certain aspects of the software to add additional functionality. Off-the-shelf software is unlikely to completely address a company’s needs. But if a proprietary solution is sought, it’s likely that this development will be more expensive. It is sometimes thought that Linux software cannot rival Microsoft applications in a commercial setting because the strength of Linux comes from its price. In fact, Linux’s strength derives from other considerations such as flexibility, stability, security, cutting-edge technology, and ease of use. Additionally, the virtues of open source software are invaluable to commercial organizations whatever their size. With full access to source code, companies can easily develop extensions to the software, tailor made to their own specific needs and requirements. Moreover they are not reliant on the goodwill of a single vendor in order to do business: Linux is about freedom and choice and that is just as important to an organisation as to an individual.
  • Mir's Wayland Support Will Now Let You Drag Around Windows
    I was surprised to learn that up until this week, Mir's initial Wayland support didn't allow for windows of Wayland clients to be moved around the screen. Fortunately, that has now been resolved with allowing window movement to be initiated by Wayland clients running on Mir. Now you can enjoy Qt, GTK apps, and even the Weston Terminal to be moved around the screen. Previously there was just server-side support for moving windows in Wayland while now is client-side support.
  • Nix 2.0 Package Manager Released With A Ton Of Changes
    Nix 2.0 is now available as the latest major update to this functional package manager most commonly associated with the NixOS Linux distribution.
  • KubeVirt v0.3.0-alpha.3: Kubernetes native networking and storage
    First post for quite some time. A side effect of being busy to get streamline our KubeVirt user experience. KubeVirt v0.3.0 was not released at the beginnig of the month. That release was intended to be a little bigger, because it included a large architecture change (to the good). The change itself was amazingly friendly and went in without much problems - even if it took some time. But, the work which was building upon this patch in the storage and network areas was delayed and didn’t make it in time. Thus we skipped the release in order to let storage and network catch up.
  • Top 5 open source projects for 2018
    In our increasingly collaborative world, open source technology is a top trend that is having a major impact on the development and implementation of cutting edge capabilities. Open source is when source code connected to a program is made freely available, giving users the opportunity to make modifications and to share with other users. The common alternative to this is proprietary software, source code that remains under the strict control of an organisation, team or individual, ensuring that the integral code remains private and controlled by its owner.
  • DataTorrent Glues Open Source Componentry with ‘Apoxi’
    Building an enterprise-grade big data application with open source components is not easy. Anybody who has worked with Apache Hadoop ecosystem technology can tell you that. But the folks at DataTorrent say they’ve found a way to accelerate the delivery of secure and scalable big data applications with Apoxi, a new framework they created to stitch together major open source components like Hadoop, Spark, and Kafka, in an extensible and pluggable fashion.

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.