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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 28/09/2011 - 4:54am
Story Desura Beta Client Hands-On Impressions srlinuxx 28/09/2011 - 2:33am
Story Get Out Of Your Comfort Zone srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 11:40pm
Story Open Source, Open Mind srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 11:36pm
Story Fedora and RHEL Documentation srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 11:32pm
Story Glamor Project Is Called To Be Merged Into X.Org Server srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 9:24pm
Story Who Will Lead Free Software in the Future? srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 9:22pm
Story There are over 300 Distributions of Linux- Which One Should You Use? srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 9:21pm
Story Quick Look: Bodhi Linux 1.2 srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 9:18pm
Story One Point Oh! srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 6:39pm

Why Linux STILL runs faster than Windows

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The difference between the two operating systems and what really makes the hair split is the underlying design philosophy that went into creating these essential parts of our computing experience.

is GNU/Linux for you? Probably not

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From time to time, it is not uncommon to encounter a confession on the net, a bleating essay that says "I can't run Linux, though I'd love to", and advances a host of assorted "reasons" for this act of commission.

Linux Gazette March 2007 (#136) Issue Ready

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This month's Linux Gazette is online and ready to read. Some highlights include A Beginner's Guide to Dual Booting Linux Mint and Windows XP, Interview: Orv Beach, and Keymap and IOCTLs.

The Road to KDE 4: Dolphin and Konqueror

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As some of you who monitor the KDE news sphere may have noticed, there has been a recent addition to the kdebase module. The Dolphin File Manager has been added to complement Konqueror's browsing capabilities. Read on for more information about this new File Manager and its relationship to Konqueror and the rest of KDE.

Pimp My Boot Process

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A few weeks ago I tried to improve the visual appearance of my boot process using usplash and a matching grub splash theme. Since creating usplash themes is rather tricky and not really suitable for the average user I decided to switch to splashy. So here is my current solution for a nice bootup:

How to build a live Fedora CD using Kadischi

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Kadischi was created in 2005 by Darko Ilic specifically for creating Fedora based Live CDs. Although it is still in active early development, it is still quite usable. What this means to the average user, is that there currently are not any RPMs for Kadischi; it is only downloadable from CVS. Fear not, this is covered below, and it’s quite easy to build.

Novell has loss, missing Wall Street target

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Novell Inc. reported a quarterly loss on Thursday, missing Wall Street forecasts as the business software maker's sales fell and it took a charge for a consulting unit that it aims to sell.

Why console apps still rock

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I know there’s a portion of Ubuntu (and other distro) users who resent six virtual consoles running at a time, in addition to the X desktop in a default Ubuntu setup. I would agree that six is probably overkill, but removing them completely would be nuts.

Playing Classic Games

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Many of us do still remember the Alley Cat and Mario and Contra and other classic games we used to play whether on Nintendo NES or DOS or SNES, these games were simple compared to todays games but were very entertaining nonetheless. In this article i describe how to play these games on your Ubuntu box.

Any objections? For Open XML standard, yes (still)

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Microsoft Corp.’s Open XML file format cleared a small hurdle Wednesday, after documents released by the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) showed fewer countries harboring strong objections than had been expected.

Fosdem Slides Highlight New openSUSE Features

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Andreas Jaeger presented slides at Fosdem 2007 on highlights of the major new features of openSUSE 10.3. One idea is to provide a minimal install of a base system and complete the remaining over the network to reduce downloading and media waste. Other key areas are performance improvements and early KDE 4 adoption.

Allowing Limited Sudo Access With Visudo

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If you’ve used your Ubuntu machine for more than a week you’ve probably run into the sudo command. Now what happens when you have another user on that machine that needs certain superuser privileges but you don’t want to give them FULL access?

Fedora cleans its repositories, considers move to Free Software

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The Red Hat-sponsored Fedora project is undergoing several changes before the release of its next version. In preparation for Fedora 7, which will fuse the Core and Extra software repositories, Fedora's developers are auditing the repositories for non-free and non-open software that doesn't meet the project's guidelines. Eventually, the project may change its package guidelines to only allow Free Software.

Choice or Chaos? The High Cost of Linux Fragmentation

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Freedom of choice is one of the great benefits of Open Source Software in general and Linux in particular. However, a couple of announcements this week seem to indicate that market value of freedom of choice has dipped considerably. The biggest hurdle Linux adoption faced this week wasn't Microsoft, it was an enemy from within: Linux fragmentation.

Don’t Use Yum To Update To Fedora 7!

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The update from one Fedora version to the next by yum was never officially supported - however, given that you were brave enough it could work out. However, for the next Fedora version you shouldn’t try it because you might even make your system unbootable!

PCLinuxOS Magazine March 2007 Issue 7 Released!

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It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by, the March 2007 issue (#7)  is available for download!  Our previous issues can also be downloaded.

Mozilla Firefox Wins Anti-Spam Award

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Mozilla Firefox, a free, open-source web browser for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X, has long had a loyal cult following. Now Datamation’s readers have taken notice, choosing Firefox – narrowly – to win its Product of the Year award in the Anti-Spam category.

Eric Raymond: Yes, "open source" is still meaningful

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Writing in O'Reilly's Radar, Nat Torkington argues that the term "open source" is becoming meaningless. He points to SugarCRM's badgeware, through which, he claims, only two-thirds of their code is downloadable, and rPath and MontaVista, which "sell software that works on Linux but the software itself isn't actually open source."

Using squidGuard for content filtering

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Content filtering for the Web can be a messy proposition. A business may need to block only the most objectionable Web sites, while schools may be required by law to follow a more thorough process. Whatever your needs, you can build a solution with only open source pieces: squid, squidGuard, and blacklists.

Dell censors IdeaStorm Linux dissent

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It seems pointless seeking ideas and feedback if you’re going to ignore and delete the ones you don’t like. That’s exactly what Dell is doing with its IdeaStorm web site, which has been set up by the company to solicit ideas and feedback.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.