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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

PC-BSD Interview

Filed under
Interviews

PC-BSD is one of the newest additions to the BSD family. The focus for this project is to create a user-friendly desktop experience based on FreeBSD and it has quickly garnered attention from media and the community. Kris Moore founder and lead developer of PC-BSD took some time off to answer a few questions about the past and current state of the project in general and its relation to KDE in particular.

Savage: The Battle for Newerth now Freeware

Filed under
Gaming

If you woke up this morning, and felt like dropping half a bill to get Savage:TBfN from Tuxgames. Well DON'T! As of September 1st, 2006, s2games released their gem, Savage: The Battle for Newerth, as freeware for Linux, Windows and Mac users.

ATI Fedora Installation

Filed under
HowTos

Introduced in the 8.27.10 display drivers was packaging support for Fedora Core. Presently supported by these scripts are Fedora Core 3, 4, 5, and the initial support for 6 (Test 2). Also supported is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 and 4. Generating these RPM packages of the fglrx drivers is actually quite an easy process. Below are the general guidelines.

GNOME 2.16 Released

Filed under
Software

Although we are awaiting official announcements, it appears gnome 2.16 has been finalized. According to release notes and packages on mirrors, it is here.

Linux Surveys

Filed under
Linux

Is Linux dying in the embedded space? Or is it healthier than ever? Surveys don't paint a clear picture.

DOS lives! Open source reinvents past

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OSS

Twelve years after Microsoft announced it would stop development of DOS, an open source replacement - FreeDOS - has hit its 1.0 release.

Ubuntu Christian Edition 1.2

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu
-s

I've been a bit intrigued since first hearing of Ubuntu Christian Edition. I had previously downloaded version 1.0, but didn't get around to testing it. I hadn't deleted it yet in hopes I'd find the time to review it. So, when 1.2 was recently released, I thought here was my chance. But after testing it, I'm left scratching my head.

Ubuntu leaps forward with new innovations

Filed under
Ubuntu

Upon developing a quite solid desktop operating system, Ubuntu seems to be moving forward with new innovations, this time, I would say, pushing the boundaries of the GNU/Linux world even further.

Linux wins over new fans

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Ubuntu

Linux is shedding its hard-core techie image in a bid to woo ordinary human beings seeking an easy-to-use operating system that can be downloaded for free.

Bergen puts Linux plan on hold

Filed under
Linux

Bergen has become the latest city to rethink its plan to move to open source software. Two years ago, Norway's second-largest city hit the headlines when it announced it would move all its 15,000 civil servants and 36,000 teachers and students to Linux, moving away from Microsoft's proprietary software. Instead, the city will stick with Microsoft.

'FOSS, bandwidth key' - Shuttleworth

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OSS

Free software, skills and bandwidth are the key anchors of a successful ICT programme. This is what Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth told the delegates at the ISPA iWeek conference in Midrand this morning.

Hands on help: Can I read NFTS partitions with Linux?

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HowTos

I dual boot with XP and Linux and I have heard that Linux can read and write to NTFS partitions, but I can’t do it. Can you help?

Win a copies of “The Linux® Kernel Primer” and “Linux® Debugging and Performance Tuning”

Filed under
Linux

This week FreeSoftwareMagazine is giving away a copy of The Linux® Kernel Primer: A Top-Down Approach for x86 and PowerPC Architectures AND a copy of Linux® Debugging and Performance Tuning: Tips and Techniques.

teehee! IE 7 site leads to Firefox hole

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Web

Online users that key in www.ie7.com expecting to locate information on the upcoming Microsoft browser IE 7, will instead see a big logo of Firefox, the open source browser developed by Mozilla.

hmmm, Loony Linux

Filed under
Linux

Richard Stallman is the founder of the FSF or the Free Software Foundation, which was formed in 1984 to promote free software development as opposed to proprietary software for which he also started something called the GNU project. Linux has about 2% of the global desktop market share so coming across a Linux desktop itself is a rarity. But all of that might soon change as our very own Kerala state government has announced that it will promote and encourage the usage of Linux systems as opposed to Microsoft

Gentoo 2006.1 LiveCD Screenshots

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Gentoo

Gentoo has issued its second major release of the year. Gentoo 2006.1 delivers on an AMD64 x86_64 LiveCD, Networkless install mode, and more! As usual we have up some screenshots of this latest release.

Oh no. Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin dead

Filed under
Obits

Australian television personality and environmentalist Steve Irwin has died in a marine accident in north Queensland, Australian state government sources say.

Ubuntu and TeamSpeak 2

Filed under
Software

In the last week or so I made a move from Kubuntu over to Ubuntu. Once I spent all the time getting the Desktop setup I figured I would skip the XGL/Compiz idea and worry about getting more important things to work such as TeamSpeak 2.

Vmware stage 1: Getting the info, Getting the files.

Filed under
HowTos

Ok - Hope you are all ready to go with Vmware Server. Awesome little product to run a virtual pc of Windows, Linux, pretty much any operating system within linux. So it is now it is handy for those who cannot let go of some of those windows applications.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more