Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 06 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Ubuntu 7.04 (Beta) on an eMac - Part 1: Installation

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have an older G4 eMac with 512Mb RAM. I upgraded the CD-Rom to a DVD burner and am installing Feisty on it. I did however run into issues just getting to the install. Here are the steps I followed to get a successful install started from the Live CD.

1. Download the ISO from here. (I grabbed the one labeled “Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop CD “).

The 451 Group on 'Going Open'

Filed under
OSS

Nearly two months ago, Raven Zachary, a senior analyst with The 451 Group, sent me his research report "Going Open: Software Vendors in Transition." I've been waiting for the chance to read it in full, but it hasn't been easy finding time to plow through its 66 pages. On a flight to Europe yesterday I found the time, and am glad I did.

Howto: Tango In Openoffice

Filed under
HowTos

I recently tried the latest version of Ubuntu and they're theming OpenOffice. I noticed they included the Tango version of OOo's icons. They look amazing so when I went back to OpenSuse I decided to try and get them on there. Here's the howto.

Browse to http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/pool/main/o/openoffice.org/ and find the package openoffice.org-style-tango*.deb

The myth of free Linux

Filed under
Linux

Those of you who are considering moving away from Windows to Linux for your desktop may need to be dispelled of a certain myth. No matter what distribution you ultimately choose to download, Linux is by no means free of financial cost.

Open up and be free

Filed under
OSS

There is one class of software whose authors want you to copy their work for free and encourage you to distribute it to others. It’s occasionally called Open Source software and it’s described by some as being “free”, since you can don’t have to purchase a licence in order to own or use it.

Installing VirtualBox On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can install InnoTek's VirtualBox on a Ubuntu desktop. With VirtualBox you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux and Windows under a host operating system.

A conversation with Mark Shuttleworth over fine food and fine football

Filed under
Ubuntu

What a perfect day. I'm in London today, and went to the Arsenal vs. Bolton match with Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu. Mark isn't a big football fan, but he indulged my Arsenal fixation and even treated me like a rational human being, which I decidedly am not when it comes to football. Arsenal won 2-1. All is right in the universe.

Foxiewire Update

Filed under
Moz/FF

Just 9 days after the official announcement about the new Spread Firefox project Foxiewire, membership has jumped from 12 to 101.

It’s great to see that people are participating and submitting Mozilla news stories and they are voting on them. All are welcome to join so go on over to Foxiewire today and sign up.

Something for my Mouse Cursor

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes mouse cursor can be very annoying, when you are reading some articles, writing blog post. Especially when you are using a low quality optical mouse that always have jitter motion on mouse cursor, it will disturbs your reading and writing as well. To cater this issue, we have a package called unclutter to hide your mouse when it is idle for certain period of time.

Book review Linux System Administration

Filed under
Reviews

Linux System Administration is a book for a seasoned Linux or UNIX administrator. The book attempts to describe day-to-day administration, maintenance and advanced issues commonly faced by Linux system administrator. Book covers wild verity of topics.

An Outcry For Improved ATI Linux Drivers

Filed under
Software

When I heard a sharp and continuous beeping sound, I had just grabbed my mug to enjoy my evening tea with the movie I was trying to watch. Without asking any questions to my computer (implicitly or explicitly), I had put down the mug and reached for the reset button on my PC. This was the third time in 45 minutes and it had never happened before.

Best 13 Rss Readers for Linux

Filed under
Software

When it comes to Rss Readers Linux had a slow start.

The Rss Reader is a new way for you to monitor your favorite blogs or news sites and make sure that you are alerted whenever new content or articles appear, all this without the email spam.

Here’s a list with the Best 13 Rss Readers for Linux fans:

1. Google Reader and Bloglines

Nvu - The Free And Easy Way To Build Your Web Site

Filed under
Software

Nvu is a WYSIWYG editor for designing and maintaining web pages. WYSIWYG, pronounced "we-see-wig", stands for "What You See Is What You Get", which means that the page that you look at while you write and edit, looks just like the way the page will look when it is viewed through a web browser (as opposed to writing HTML code where you have to guess and test how it may look).

Meet the Distro guy

Filed under
Interviews

There's no dearth of Linux distributions. This isn't the first time I've said this. Neither will it be the last. But why the chaos? Why are there more failed distributions than successful ones? Ask the distro guy, Ladislav Bodnar, maintainer of DistroWatch.com.

Ubuntu 7.04 - Steady updates, fixes, work-around for Compiz

Filed under
Ubuntu

The updates keep coming in at a steady rate every day. They range anywhere from 20 to 40 packages/update on a given day. It will be interesting to see what is finally touched up and cleaned up for the April 19th official release of 7.04.

Some good news: The display problem with the NetworkManager was fixed with today's updates. It now displays the state of the underlying networking system.

Adventures with Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu

A week or two ago I was at Frys and came across The Official Ubuntu Book. I've heard a lot about this flavor of Linux lately and thought it was high time I started working with it.

A collection of tips for people new to BSD

Filed under
BSD

The first time I was introduced to FreeBSD - a BSD variant, I came away really impressed. In my opinion, from an end user's perspective, the only difference between a BSD and Linux is the difference in licencing.

Planet Penguin Racer - Revival?

Filed under
Gaming

As stated in a blog entry from Free Gamer, some people are about to revive the popular TuxRacer successor PPRacer, which developement stagnated more than a year ago.

Beryl Rocks!

Filed under
Software

Recently I’ve been experimenting with Beryl on my laptop, and I have to say that I’m very impressed by the project. Sure its a relatively new project, and there quite a few bugs in it, however once you get the hang of it you really enjoy the beryl-desktop experience.

MPlayer Alarm Clock

Filed under
HowTos

So I saw surface’s post on a Linux Alarm Clock using xmms. In spirit of choice, I will show you my Mplayer Alarm Clock!

First I need to create a playlist. You can add the file you want to play (with fullpath) to a file. I do this by first going to the directory I want to make a playlist from, and execute the following command:

find "`pwd`" -name "*.mp3" -print >> playlist;

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

Linux Devices

  • This week in vc4 (2016-12-05): SDTV, 3DMMES, HDMI audio, DSI
    The Raspberry Pi Foundation recently started contracting with Free Electrons to give me some support on the display side of the stack. Last week I got to review and release their first big piece of work: Boris Brezillon's code for SDTV support. I had suggested that we use this as the first project because it should have been small and self contained. It ended up that we had some clock bugs Boris had to fix, and a bug in my core VC4 CRTC code, but he got a working patch series together shockingly quickly. He did one respin for a couple more fixes once I had tested it, and it's now out on the list waiting for devicetree maintainer review. If nothing goes wrong, we should have composite out support in 4.11 (we're probably a week late for 4.10).
  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Driver Work On SDTV, HDMI Audio & More
    Eric Anholt's latest weekly blog post on the VC4 development highlights SDTV support coming together, the Raspberry Pi Foundation contracting Free Electrons to provide more development help on the display stack, HDMI audio support for VC4 DRM driver continuing to inch along, DSI fixes, some code generation improvements for VC4 Gallium3D, and other work.
  • Rugged Skylake embedded PC has wide range power
    Axiomtek’s “eBOX565-500-FL” computer runs Linux or Windows on dual-core Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offers four USB 3.0 ports and wide-range power. The eBOX565-500-FL updates the two-year-old eBOX560-880-FL embedded PC, which provides dual-core Intel 4th Gen “Haswell” Core and Celeron CPUs. The very similar eBOX565-500-FL instead taps the 14nm Intel 6th Gen “Skylake” ULT processors, once again offering two dual-core options: the 2.4GHz Core i5-6300U and the 2.0GHz Celeron 3955U.

Servers/Networks

  • Docker acquires file syncing and sharing app Infinit, will open-source the software
    Docker, the startup that pushes open source software for packaging up code into containers that can be deployed on many machines, today announced its latest acquisition: file transfer app Infinit. Yes, that’s right, Docker bought a company with a consumer-friendly app. It lets you sync files to your other devices or send them to others.
  • How Virtualized Networks Will Save Us From Dropped Calls
    We’ve all been the victim of a dropped mobile phone call and know how frustrating it can be. However, virtualized networks provide network operators with powerful tools to detect and recover from network disruptions, or “faults,” that can drop calls for thousands of subscribers simultaneously. The Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) project together with OpenStack have developed features in software that add resiliency to mobile networks and enable them to recover from network and other outages.
  • It’s Brexploitation! Microsoft punishes UK for Brexit with cloud price-gouging
    “My own story would not have been possible but for the democratizing force of Microsoft technology reaching me where I was growing up,” CEO Satya Nadella told shareholders this week. But the price of that “democratizing force” is about to go up, with Britons uniquely singled out. Microsoft has reiterated to Azure customers that prices will go up by 22 per cent from January 1st. The problem? The price rise is far greater than any exchange rate post-Brexit fluctuations might justify. Microsoft’s biggest European data centre is in Dublin, a member of the Euro currency. The Euro hovered around €1.28 to one pound for the first six months of the year, before crashing after Brexit. It’s now €1.19, a depreciation of just 9 cents, or 7 per cent. The value of the British pound has weakened more dramatically against the US dollar, dropping by 18.9 per cent since 24 June - the day after Brits voted to leave the EU. For new Office or Azure cloud customers in the UK, no exchange rate can justify any price rise at all. In September, Microsoft made Azure available in UK data centres.

Android Leftovers