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Wednesday, 24 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDevelop 4.6 Improves Its UI, GDB Support, PHP Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:52am
Story Fedora Memory Comparison Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:47am
Story Linux-based TOR gadget protects IP identity Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:37am
Story A Plexible Pi Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 6:42am
Story Budapest district debunks misgivings over open source Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 10:19pm
Story Out in the Open: How to Resurrect a Dead Open Source Project Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 10:09pm
Story NVIDIA Helping Nouveau With Video Decoding Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 10:00pm
Story HP Launches Portal to Sell Its Software Online Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:54pm
Story Moto G Goes Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:47pm
Story How to make the brave move from commercial to open source Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:31pm

Red Hat: Customers can Deploy Linux With Confidence

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: Red Hat is assuring its customers that they can continue to deploy its Linux operating system with confidence and without fear of legal retribution from Microsoft, despite the increasingly vocal threats emanating from Redmond.

Also: Ballmer comments reflect deeper problems

12 Tips for KDE Users

Filed under
KDE

itmanagement: Whenever you're dealing with a piece of software as large as a desktop, some features are going to be hard to find. To help new users get up and running, here are twelve tips for getting more out of KDE.

The weather in the news...

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

spokesmanreview.com/blogs: While I appreciate having the weather bar atop the SR web site, unlike most people reading the news online, I have little use for the link and even less use for Accuweather, but the story only begins there, for my tastes in what I allow on my computer desktop differs a lot from your typical Windows user. That is because, for over five years and change, I have been nearly-exclusively running Linux in the GUI workstation mode, and for over two years using Ubuntu Linux workstation as my operating system of choice.

gentoo-sources-2.6.23 feature changes

Filed under
Gentoo

dsd’s weblog: In addition to all the upstream changes, gentoo-sources-2.6.23 (which will be in portage very soon) has some Gentoo-specific feature changes worth noting:

GCC 4.2.2 Released

Filed under
Software

kernelTRAP: Mark Mitchell announced the availability of GCC 4.2.2 saying, "GCC 4.2.2 is a bug-fix release, containing fixes for regressions in GCC 4.2.1 relative to previous GCC releases."

10 Rocking Features in 10 Days: Day 2: Bulletproof X and Graphical X configuration

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Yesterday we kicked this whole thing off and took a look at Deskbar and Tracker. Today we turn our attention to X, the graphical subsystem of any Ubuntu (or Linux or Unix machine). As any existing Ubuntu user knows, not only do you need to configure X, but breakages can happen. Thankfully with Ubuntu 7.10, there comes a few new features to help out with these problems, including better auto detection and configuration, Bulletproof X and graphical X config, for those times when you really to play with something.

Also: Gutsy Release Parties

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Alternative Open Source Drivers for ATI Graphics Cards

  • How To: Run A Portable Puppy Linux Install On Any Computer
  • Ballmer: All open source dev should happen on Windows
  • Making Sure Linux Doesn't Get Lost in Translation
  • Using your Webcam with Kopete and Jabber
  • A label printer for Linux
  • How to make Totem Media Player play encrypted DVD's
  • Installing PHP for Lighttpd on Linux
  • My Debian desktop (and: Why some distros work like crap)
  • Becoming an Ubuntu Developer is easy
  • Will Thunderbird fall to earth?
  • Video capture device suits Windows and Linux
  • Tip of the Trade: Hardware Discovery From Outside
  • gPodder - A Full Featured Podcast Client for Linux

Diversity in FOSS - help or hinderance?

Filed under
OSS

FOSSwire: One feature of the free software/open source development model that is largely unique and differs from the proprietary model is sheer diversity.

Ubuntu vs. Debian, graphically explained

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger: col·lab·o·rate
1 : to work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor
Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 11th

par·a·site
synonyms: PARASITE, SYCOPHANT, TOADY, LEECH, SPONGE

Brainstorming ideas for the GIMP's next interface

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The GIMP image editor is preparing for the start of a new development cycle, and you can have your say in the way the next version looks by submitting a mock-up to the GIMP UI Brainstorm blog. User interface designer Peter Sikking spoke with us about the project and how it fits into the larger work of creating the GIMP's UI.

Get down and dirty with Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcadvisor: Let me start with a controversial statement: installing new software is almost always easier on Linux than on Windows. On most Linux systems, a package manager takes care of both the installation and removal of software.

The SUSE impression fades a little

Filed under
SUSE

abhay-techzone.blogspot: I was in total awe of SUSE 10.2. I liked its stability, performance, improvements to OpenOffice, YAST2, security, default fonts and above all the default theme and artwork. I was all praises for SUSE in my comparison of SUSE with Ubuntu. A lot has changed since then.

One day without graphics but with Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxscrews: The idea to work one day without graphical applications and use only text utilities like wget isn't new but… Here is the list of essential tools that are invaluable to make "text mode day" real.

Linux 2.6.23 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

Phoronix: The Linux 2.6.23 kernel has been released today and we have some preliminary benchmarks of the 2.6.23 kernel as we compare it to the past Linux 2.6.22 kernel.

Fedora Developer Interview: Máirín Duffy

Filed under
Interviews

Fedoraproject: Over the past few releases, Fedora has gained a reputation amongst the various distributions for having some of the best artwork out there. This time around, responsibility has been handed over entirely to the community Art Team, and they've done themselves proud. Mairin Duffy, Fedora Art team lead, previews of some of the key elements belonging to the infinity theme.

Luke Schierer discusses Pidgin, Open source and life

Filed under
Interviews

computerworld: With over 3 million estimated users, Pidgin is an open source instant messaging program for Windows, Linux, BSD, and other Unix platforms. It works with AIM, ICQ, Jabber/XMPP, MSN Messenger, Yahoo, Bonjour, Gadu-Gadu, IRC, Novell GroupWise Messenger, QQ, Lotus Sametime, SILC, SIMPLE, MySpaceIM, and Zephyr.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.23 Released

Filed under
Linux

pcburn: Linus has tagged the final release of kernel 2.6.23. Grab a copy from kernel.org and give it a run through if you've been waiting on features.

Show us your pumpkins!

Filed under
OSS

red hat mag: We’re giving away $50 for the best pumpkin related to open source, Linux, Red Hat, Creative Commons, or any of the other things we post about here. Carve it, paint it, however you want to decorate it, as long as it’s creative.

XSensors 0.60: New Chips

Filed under
Hardware
Software

linuxhardware.org: This is another release of xsensors, a program designed to display all the related information from your motherboard sensors. This information is gathered via lm_sensors, the software drivers that actually gathers the sensor information.

opensuse-xgl-settings

Filed under
Software
SUSE

CyberOrg: cb400f has released his popular opensuse-xgl-settings for openSUSE 10.3, it is a GUI tool for KDE that makes installing and configuring Compiz Fusion painless.

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More in Tux Machines

More of today's howtos

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.