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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mandriva 2009.0 Review:

Filed under
MDV

ryanorser.com: Mandriva has been great for users who just like to have something that looks peaceful and easy to use. For new users with laptops I would recommend Mandriva One 2009 as it has a better background and supports wireless….

Ubuntu developers discovered exactly nothing

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger.org: Only a site like Softpedia can post an article such as Newly Discovered Kernel Vulnerabilities Affect All Ubuntu Users, which starts this way: «Yesterday, November 27th, the Ubuntu developers discovered yet another security issue (actually, more than one) in the Linux kernel packages.» On the contrary, they were late to fix those kernel vulnerabilities...

Picasa 3: Great Linux photo software

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I have a confession to make. There's no software on earth I can't make dance and sing... except for photography programs. Whether it's Adobe Photoshop CS4 on a Mac or GIMP 2.6.3 on Linux, I'm a klutz.

KDE Videocast Episode 3, November 29

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Episode 3 of my KDE videocast will be broadcast live at 17:00 UTC on Saturday, November 29nd over at UStream.

Also: dolphin screencast

Linux and Us Kenyans - Part II

Filed under
Linux

mwendariungu.wordpress: Most of us are still holding on to ancient Linux distros whose operation may involve extensive use of command line tools made necessary by the need to install software from external sources.

Newly Discovered Kernel Vulnerabilities Affect All Ubuntu Users

Filed under
Security

news.softpedia.com: Yesterday, November 27th, the Ubuntu developers discovered yet another security issue (actually, more than one) in the Linux kernel packages. These vulnerabilities affect the following Ubuntu distributions: 6.06 LTS, 7.10, 8.04 LTS and 8.10 (also applies to Kubuntu, Edubuntu and Xubuntu).

Half of Firefox Extensions Not Compatible with 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

cybernetnews.com: Mozilla is on the verge of releasing Firefox 3.1 Beta 2, and it’s quite possible that in the next month or two the final version will be pushed out the door. A major new release like this means that some of your favorite extensions might not be working, and Mozilla doesn’t want that to happen.

Proprietary Firmware and the Pursuit of a Free Kernel

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Knowing when a GNU/Linux distribution is free used to be simple. If all its software had licenses approved by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) or the Open Source Initiative, then a distribution was free. Otherwise, it wasn't. However, the release of the GNewSense distribution a few years ago has complicated the situation.

Plymouth To Replace USplash In Ubuntu?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: We've talked about Plymouth now a number of times at Phoronix, which is Red Hat's RHGB replacement starting with Fedora 10 and uses newer Linux technologies like kernel mode-setting to drive this graphical boot screen. Now it looks like Plymouth may make its way into Ubuntu.

Open Letter to Mr.Hervé Yahi, Mandriva CEO

Filed under
MDV

rodgerdean.org/blog: Mandriva under a change of a new CEO have now put corporate interest above the life source of the distribution; its own community and leadership in the attempt to save a dollar. This will be the ulitmate downfall of the distro if these changes continue to happen.

What Does Open Source Taste Like?

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: For those of you familiar with twitter, the "microblogging" social-networking tool, you know that it can be a fun way to gather data from a large group of people. If you have a substantial enough group of followers, inevitably, a few are paying attention most of the time, and you will get a handful of interesting responses to almost any question.

Fedora 10 vs. Ubuntu 8.10 Benchmarks

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Linux

phoronix.com: With Fedora 10 finally entering the world earlier this week, we have performed benchmarks comparing the performance of Ubuntu 8.10 and Fedora 10. In our testing we used both the 32-bit and 64-bit builds of each distribution and then ran a series of automated tests through the Phoronix Test Suite.

Vector Linux 6 Beta And The Sticky Gui

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: But one of the things - possibly the only thing - which may have held this distribution back from a regular top 10 spot on the Distrowatch rankings might be its lack of a GUI (Graphical User Interface) installer. Until now.

The history of PC hardware, in pictures

Filed under
Hardware

royal.pingdom.com: We all use personal computers and we all take them for granted in our everyday lives. It’s easy to forget that PCs have only been around for a couple of decades, and initially were nowhere near the powerhouses we have on our desks today.

Java and Linux - an open marriage in search of success

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: In 2004 Eric Raymond wrote an open letter to Sun Microsystems' then chief executive officer Scott McNealy demanding Sun open up their core Java intellectual property and allow anyone do whatever they damn well please with it.

LOL With Funny Linux Man Pages

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Are you feeling a little down lately? Why not open a Linux terminal and read some man pages. Well, not those man pages that can sometimes make our head spin. I'm talking about the funny man pages that will make you laugh out loud.

openDesktop.org provides super-portal to free software sites

Filed under
Web

linux.com: When users want the latest in free and open source software (FOSS), they are likely to think first of sites like freshmeat, or perhaps Softpedia or GnomeFiles. However, as the FOSS community has divided into specialized communities, sites for new releases have proliferated, to the point where it is difficult to keep track of them all. Since 2007, openDesktop.org has provided a portal for many of these specialized sites.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Installing Drupal on Ubuntu in a few easy steps

  • Interview with openSUSE Board member Bryen Yunashko
  • Acer Aspire One and Linux
  • SproutCore on Intrepid Ibex
  • An early glimpse of Ubuntu 9.04
  • MySQL 5.1 is ready
  • Increase downloading Speed with Prozilla Download Accelerator for Linux
  • Upgrading Nvidia 96xx from Ubuntu 8.04 to 8.10
  • Speeding up a slow NVidia 8400 card in opensuse linux
  • Setting up your Ubuntu Server for Merb
  • Extract and Create RAR Files in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Packages Get Bazaar-ed

10 Of The Best Linux Desktop Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: One of the best thing that I love about Linux desktop is its flexibility and the ability to tweak and customize every single part of it to your liking. For those who are put off by the default ugly desktop (especially the brown desktop of Ubuntu) and have absolutely no idea how to decorate your desktop, here are 10 of the best desktop customization screenshots that could inject some inspiration to your creativity.

Vladivostok Gives Free GNU/Linux Netbooks

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

opendotdotdot.blogspot: I've written before about the increasing uptake of, and innovation around, free software in Russia. Here's another fascinating experiment, involving the Vladivostok State University of Economics and Services, which is giving students netbooks running the Mandriva distro.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more