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Saturday, 25 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open Source Developers Promise New API for Dovecot Email Data Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 10:54am
Story Salix Openbox 14.1 Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 10:32am
Story Open source love at first commit Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:55am
Story WebODF easily used, part 1: ViewerJS Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:47am
Story Mozilla at O’Reilly Open Source Convention Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:44am
Story Per-activity favourites in Kickoff Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 9:40am
Story Rumors circulate Motorola is building the next Nexus device Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:28am
Story Meson: A Next-Gen Build System Showing Promise Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:19am
Story DARPA-derived secure microkernel goes open source tomorrow Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:12am
Story GUADEC 2014, Day Two: Pitivi, Automotive, Boxes, Fleet Commander Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2014 - 8:04am

On Linux Hardware Compatibility

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

terminally-incoherent.com: I love how anti-linux advocates and windows fanbois always pick on Linux for hardware compatibility or rather lack of thereof. Just about every rant about Linux I have seen so far includes a gripe about it not supporting new or exotic hardware out of the box. Funny thing is that, neither does Windows.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Back on the Linux bandwagon

  • Enable DVD Playback, Flash and MP3 Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu on Windows with Wubi
  • Known hardy bugs and workarounds
  • gimpsvn.sh — Install or update to GIMP 2.5 from SVN on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron nests at Fox News
  • A Smart Feature of Ubuntu You May Not Have Noticed
  • Installing Four Other Desktop Edition on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu removing XML from Python?
  • Fun with Amazon S3 in Ubuntu

Compiz Fusion Community News for May 7th, 2008: An edition of bling and subtlty

Filed under
Software

More CF news is down the tubes this week, major highlights being A FULL sphere deformation mode for cubeaddon, A subtler static applications switcher, and A subtler set a viewport switching plugins.

The Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: This is it. It’s now. Like it or not, you can quiver in your boots and moan about this driver or that hardware or the other usability feature, but I have two, solid irrefutable signs of the apocalypse.

Valve's Source Engine Coming To Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: There have been rumors since last year that Valve may be serious about porting Source games to Linux after Valve Software began seeking a senior software engineer with the responsibility of porting Windows-based games to the Linux platform.

Linux Web services with Apache Synapse

Filed under
News

Discover Apache Synapse, a high-performance enterprise service bus with simple configuration, extensible architecture, and a minimal footprint. It is a versatile tool that you can use for a variety of tasks. This article examines how you can use Apache Synapse to create mock Web services.

Cairo-Dock is pain free eye candy

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: It's a weird phenomenon. Nearly every computer platform steals another one's look. Vista gets accused of trying to look too much like OS X. Linux desktops get accused of trying to look like Vista (except when they're accused of ripping off OS X).

Running Only on Open-Source Software

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: Open-source software has found increasing acceptance within IT for infrastructure application - but many may still wonder, 'Is it possible to run a company almost entirely with open-source offerings?'

Does a Linux OS perform better than a Windows ?

Filed under
Linux

itvoir.com: No doubt Windows is still the candy of each user’s eye but Linux has evolved over a span and made its presence felt strongly in the market gradually. With many add ons as compared to Windows, there are a few interesting features about Linux.

Moonlighting Linux: the future of rich web apps

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: As we know, static HTML web sites are passé. Yet, Java applets never turned out to be the killer online application platform they possibly could have been. The modern introduction of Ajax has undoubtedly improved the web experience but it’s not a panacea. Here’s how to get started using the Moonlight development technology from the Mono Project.

Windows-based EeePC cheaper than Linux one

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

apcmag.com: Is ASUS in bed with Microsoft? The new XP-based EeePC 900 will actually be cheaper than the Linux-based version.

Slackware 12.1: Do-it-yourself-NUX

Filed under
Slack

techiemoe.com: Slackware is perhaps the closest thing on the market right now to a "generic" Linux distribution. You won't find branded wallpapers, special bootsplash screens, or really much at all that identifies your system as "Slackware" other than the LILO prompt.

OpenSolaris is here to stay

Filed under
OS

blogbeebe.blogspot: I've never gotten angrier after reading a blog post like I did after read Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols' post "OpenSolaris Arrive just to Die". The crux of sjvn's argument is: Still, all that said, I think OpenSolaris could survive, and possibly even thrive, if it wasn’t for one sad, simple fact.

OpenOffice.org 3 beta is ready for testing

Filed under
OOo

openoffice.org: The OpenOffice.org Community is pleased to announce that the public beta release of OpenOffice.org 3.0 is now available. This beta release is made available to allow a broad user base to test and evaluate the next major version of OpenOffice.org.

KDE 4.0.4 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: he KDE Community today announced the immediate availability of KDE 4.0.4, the fourth bugfix and maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Miniature Linux PC targets military apps

  • Free Flash community reacts to Adobe Open Screen Project
  • Meet Inna Kuznetsova, IBM's Linux Strategy Director (video)
  • Lost in Linux Land 2
  • Essential Linux Device Drivers
  • A Brief History of Sun by Groklaw's grouch
  • Qt rev'd
  • Commentary: What's the deal with embedded Linux?
  • OpenSolaris Wants To Compete With Linux - Oh Yeah?
  • For gorsake, stop laughing, this is Linux!
  • Is open source dead?
  • Open source as the villain in its own story
  • OpenSolaris Just Wants to be Free
  • OLPC tries to bridge gap with developer community
  • OOXML expert: ODF flaws remain
  • Get some AIR on Linux
  • Reinventing OpenSolaris
  • It's official: The future of Sun/MySQL is open...and closed
  • DRM and unintended consequences

Everyone loves the Eee

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

zdnet.com: I spent the day at a conference sponsored by our SIS developer. What’s interesting, however, was the participants’ reactions to an Asus Eee PC that one of the other attendees brought with her.

GNU/Linux: Source Code and Human Rights

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: James Maguire, Datamation's managing editor, claims he has no interest in software whose source code is available for editing. "I'm not a software engineer," he says. "If I can't grab it off the shelf, I can't use it." He's half-joking, of course. But he echoes the opinion of many people outside the community.

Getting ready for Dragonfly...

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Today we released the first alpha of our new web developer tool. The objective for this first alpha release is to get feedback and of course allow you to start using it. You should expect it to be buggy and even missing some key features, but that is what alpha means.

Thoughts on CommunityOne and OpenSolaris

Joe Brockmeier: Sun finally pushed out its Project Indiana yesterday, in the form of a packaged version of OpenSolaris that looks quite a lot like a Linux distro — minus, of course, the kernel that gives Linux its name. On the one hand, I’m pleased to see any FOSS project moving forward. On the other hand, I’m wondering what problems Sun can solve with OpenSolaris that it can’t solve by participating in the Linux community?

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.