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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Klaus Knopper Interview srlinuxx 01/10/2013 - 4:40am
Story NVIDIA, Red Hat Partner Up For New Graphics Project srlinuxx 01/10/2013 - 4:39am
Story Debian Project News - September 30th srlinuxx 01/10/2013 - 4:37am
Story SolydX 201309 Review: as good as Linux Mint srlinuxx 01/10/2013 - 4:34am
Story Tales from Linux Kernel 3.11 Development srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 6:51pm
Story Open source snapshot: GhostBSD srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 5:21pm
Story A Mac for a Linux user srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 5:20pm
Story Open source programs to get more kids to code srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 5:18pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 527 srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 1:54pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 30/09/2013 - 1:53pm

Porting C/C++ sources from Windows to UNIX

Filed under
News

Software programs are often made to run on systems that are completely different from the system in which the program is coded or developed. This process of adapting software across systems is known as porting. This article shows you how to port your software from one environment to another.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 220

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Editorial: PCLinuxOS - the new Number One distribution

  • First look: MACH BOOT - a live CD that boots in 10 seconds
  • News: Ubuntu shows faith in Compiz, openSUSE in KDE 4, Debian reveals X.Org plans, Ulteo and Linux Mint updates
  • Released last week: JackLab Audio Distribution 1.0, KnoppMyth R5F27
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 10.3 RC1
  • Site news: DistroWatch hit by a DDoS attack
  • New additions: Insigne Linux
  • New distributions: LivEPICS, Vixta.org, Geubuntu
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

KateOS - Getting Better with Age

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

KateOS 3.6 was released a few days ago. Since KateOS has always been one of my favorite distributions and since I haven't looked at it recently, I decided to take it for a test run on my HP Pavillion laptop. It always supported the hardware on my desktop, so I was interested to see how it would fare with wireless ethernet and powersaving features. There are two versions available: a full 2.4 GB DVD and a 700 MB live CD. I chose the 700 MB live CD.

Sabayon, the Gentle Gentoo

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

junauza.blogspot.com: Gentoo, formerly known as Enoch Linux is one of the pioneers among the Linux distributions. It is well-known and loved for its speed, and hated for its unfriendliness with Linux newbies. Thus, many flavours of Gentoo have been created including this highly capable one named Sabayon.

Hoist your applications with petardfs

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The petard filesystem is designed to produce only errors -- but you can stipulate what conditions generate the errors and what those errors should be. That makes petardfs useful for system and unit testing -- for example, making sure that an application gives a sane error message if it fails to open a file, or if there is a read error at byte 5000 of a file.

7 Reasons Why Linux Won't Succeed On The Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Alexander Wolfe: The open-source operating system is destined to stay stuck in the shadow of Windows, blogger Alex Wolfe opines. Read why he believes desktop Linux hasn't--and isn't--going to have any significant impact.

Hidden Linux : Filelight

Filed under
Software

Tux Love: The easiest way to check on disk space usage in Linux is to do a df -h command in a console window. Unfortunately it doesn't tell you where all the space has gone. Sheesh, what a mess! Thank heavens then for Filelight.

A first run with IBM's free office suite

Filed under
Software

Computer giant IBM yesterday released a free office suite for Windows and Linux machines called Lotus Symphony. Symphony is available from the Symphony website which requires users to register and be logged on to download the software. Symphony is available for both Linux and Windows.

Ignorance (of open source), thy name is Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Matt Asay: Oh, my. We're back to the good old days of Microsoft mythology. I had actually believed that Microsoft had grown up and wised up. But no.

How To Compile rTorrent From SVN In Ubuntu Feisty Fawn / Gutsy

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Torrent is a great way to transfer large files very quickly. However most torrent clients are gui based and have quite some impact on system resources (e.g. Azureus). rTorrent is a lightweight client running from the terminal.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Firefox 2.0.0.7 Officially Released

  • A Free Software Week quandary
  • What will KDE 4.0 be?
  • Linux: Copy on Write Credentials
  • Linux: RAS Infrastructure
  • 10th Issue of the Amarok Newsletter is Out
  • Broadcom Joins the LiMo Foundation
  • Removing orphan packages with Pacman
  • Autostart Apps in PCLinuxOS 2007 (KDE)
  • Microsoft's Mobile PC Newsletter Features Linux-enabled Nokia N800
  • World of Padman on Linux Live DVD
  • Apache lead over Microsoft IIS shrinks again

Linux And Hand-Me-Down Computing

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: My father recently retired a 1-Ghz AMD (AMD) computer with 1 Gbyte of RAM that he'd built from mail-ordered parts. My first move: Wipe it clean, install Linux, and prepare it for an exercise in "hand-me-down computing."

Got game, with linux?

Filed under
Linux

blog.spocore.com: A long time ago, back when i was still a common windows user, i was very serious in online gaming. In particularly a game called Star Wars Jedi Academy. Now I have long since switched to linux, which of course will not run the game natively.

An Idiot’s Tale of Choosing a Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

pcmechanic: I started using Windows back with Windows 3.1. I went through 95, 98, served a brief prison sentence with Windows ME, moved to 2000, then XP, and now Vista. So, I’ve pretty much used them all. The problem is that I am not much of a Linux guy. I was confused by all the myriad of distros out there. There are just TONS of them. How the hell am I supposed to choose a Linux distro?

NVIDIA 100.14.19 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: After a very slow summer, NVIDIA has finally rolled out an updated Linux proprietary display driver. The release highlights are quite extensive. For those using Compiz, Beryl, or Compiz Fusion will be pleased to know that there is improved GLX_EXT_texture_from_pixmap out-of-memory handling.

Flock 1.0 Coming Fall 2007

Filed under
Software

cybernet: When Flock 0.9 launched it was a pretty big overhaul, and now their next big milestone is Flock 1.0 which currently has a vague release date of Fall 2007. Honestly this is the dream browser.

Also: Flock: Social Network Aggregator?

All Macedonian students to use Linux desktops

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: The One Laptop per Child's XO, better known as the $100 laptop, gets most of the headlines but NComputing is showing in Macedonia, with its Ubuntu Linux based servers and virtual PC terminals, that there's more than one way to get inexpensive Linux desktops into students' hands.

IBM Symphony falls on deaf ears without open source e-mail, calendar

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: IBM’s debut of its homegrown open source version of OpenOffice without e-mail or collaboration features is not surprising but nevertheless disappointing.

Windows Guy Takes Ubuntu Gutsy To Work….

Filed under
Ubuntu

scitech.teambio.org: I’ve been experimenting with Ubuntu (Feisty) for about the last two months. In previous posts, I’ve written how pleased I was. Here are my honest observations about my day with Ubuntu at work.

Just peachy: free software, free movies

Filed under
Movies
OSS

freesoftware mag: Apparently I’ve been living under a rock, because I only recently found out about the Blender project’s free and open source short movie, Elephants Dream.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming