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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Porteus 3.1 RC1 Is a Bleeding Edge Slackaware-Based Distro with Linux Kernel 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 6:05pm
Story Five Best Linux Desktop Environments Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:57pm
Story IBM Tweaks Power-Linux Discount Deal In Europe Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:56pm
Story Parsix OS Is an Interesting GNOME and Debian 7.0 "Whezzy" Blend Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:52pm
Story Free Software is Europe’s second chance Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:51pm
Story OpenBSD Passes 300,000 Commits Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:44pm
Story Marble Atlas Review – Alternative to Google Earth Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 6:54am
Story Kickstarter pulls Anonabox, a Tor-enabled router that raised over $585,000 Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 6:45am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 12:32am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 12:32am

Kernel Log : Tux3 file system announce, X.org updates

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Kernel developer of many years, Daniel Phillips posted several emails concerning file system design, then announced he was planning to take these ideas and apply them to the design and development of Tux3, although there is no currently functioning Tux 3 source code.

What Ubuntu Thinks of a TinyTuxbox

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

gibbalog.blogspot: Tiny, quiet, green, affordable, and fun computers. Put aside that huge noisy computer box taking up so much space, and try a TinyTuxbox. Here's my attempt to look at what Ubuntu makes of this little box.

Bruce Perens: Microsoft and Apache - What's the Angle?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

itmanagement.earthweb.com: For a decade, Microsoft was open source's worst enemy, combating it at every turn. But last week Microsoft joined the Apache open source project as a platinum sponsor, promising to put $100,000 per year into a project that beats its own IIS (Internet Information Services) in the market. Microsoft also made some of their patents available for use in GPL software like Linux without a royalty. Has Redmond given up the fight? Or is this just their latest strategy?

Ultamatix may be a worthy successor to Automatix

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Some Ubuntu fans out there may remember Automatix, a tool for Ubuntu that allowed easy access to many popular non-free applications and commonly-used audio and video codecs. Automatix was discontinued in March, when its developers moved on to other projects. Now Ultamatix hopes to continue where Automatix left off.

Elonex Webbook notebook review

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

pocket-lint.co.uk: Inside the Elonex Webbook you get a 10.2-inch screen, 1.6GHz VIA C7-M processor, 80GB hard drive, and 512MB of memory. The Webbook comes with the option of two operating systems - Windows XP or the Ubuntu variant of Linux. We tested the Ubuntu version.

Free for All: Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

schoollibraryjournal.com: So what is open source software (OSS)? It’s software that is free in every sense of the word: free to download, free to use, and free to view or modify. Most OSS is distributed on the Web and you don’t need to sign a license agreement to use it. In fact, you’re probably using OSS and may not know it.

Boxee: A New Competitor For MythTV?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: For years MythTV has been regarded as the best media center application for the Linux platform and is extremely popular with HTPC enthusiasts. However, MythTV now has a new competitor and that is Boxee. Boxee is a "social media center" that is based upon the Xbox Media Center (XBMC) with versions for Linux, Windows, and MacOS X.

Penguins in Tel Aviv? It Must Be the Annual Open-Source Convention

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: Israel, where I live, is known for its large number of high-tech startups. But when I moved here in 1995, Linux and the idea of open source software was virtually unknown, even among programmers. It was thus a delight to spend this (Friday) morning with 250-300 other open-source advocates, at the annual "August Penguin" conference.

Pretty is a feature, but ugly is subjective

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: I have a problem, and I admit it. Every time someone whines — and yes, I’m using the word “whine” deliberately — about the graphical design in Ubuntu, I tune them out.

Mandriva Linux on my Acer Aspire 7220

Filed under
MDV

osgeex.blogspot: Two weeks ago I bought a Acer Aspire 7220 laptop. Based on a AMD Semphron 3800, Nvidia Geoforce 7000M, 2 GiB DDR2 RAM and a 80 GiB HDD. Everything I could ever wish for is included, except for a webcam.

How Open Source Is Your Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: Michael DeHaan has an excellent post entitled "How Open Source Is Your Open Source?". I dare say it is his best post despite getting in a few (Linux) distro biased comments. He proposes a set of community standards that determine the real health and openness of Open Source. In my opinion, a major problem with OSI at the moment is that it perpetuates (mainly indeliberately) that a mere license makes something Open Source.

For The Love Of Unix

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: “Linux users use Linux because they hate Windows. BSD users use BSD because they love Unix.” I can’t emphasize how true that statement is. I’m subscribe to several mailing lists, I subscribe to hundreds of RSS feeds, I visit forums semi-regularly, I’m on IRC 24/7 in plenty of channels. You want to know what I see?

Where is Linux in the equation?

Filed under
Linux
  • The British Library's online turn-up for the books
    --Where is Linux in the equation?

  • Photos: Rare books resurrected online
  • BL = Betrayed Library

One more reason not to trust CMake

Filed under
Software

blog.flameeyes.eu: So everybody says that CMake is great because it’s faster. Of course CMake achieves speed with an approach different from the one autotools have, that is, they don’t discover features, they apply knowledge. Hey it’s a valid method as any other, if you actually know what you are doing, and if you can keep up with variants and all the rest. Another thing that it does is to avoid the re-linking during the install phase.

Linux preinstalls rocket to three per cent

Filed under
Linux

theinquirer.net: LINUX HAS MADE headway in Microsoft's UK heartland, the PC sales channel. The number of machines shipped with Linux preloaded on them has multiplied a whopping 28 times since Microsoft launched its Vista operating system in January 2007.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • A breath of fresh air for Konsole

  • Kernel log: 2.6.25.13 corrects a vulnerability, problems with ACPI
  • Linux short tip: Extract icons from exe files
  • Install configure & use Opera 9.5 browser in openSUSE
  • IBM Lotus: we're beating Microsoft
  • My Thoughts on Linux
  • Top 10 Command Line Tools
  • Foresight Linux
  • KDE 4.1.0 disappoints
  • StarOffice Part 2
  • Ubuntu Studio Want You
  • CIO Reality Check: Linux and Virtualization
  • FSF demonstrates iPhone's incompatibility with free software and GPLv3
  • Linux Error: curses.h: No such file or directory Problem Solution
  • Mandriva 2009 Beta
  • Don’t Judge an Open Source Project by its Cover
  • Open Source Software Developer Careers
  • openSUSE Hopes to See you in San Francisco
  • Buck DNS Monoculture with BIND Alternatives

Total solar eclipse on August 1, 2008, in Northern Hemisphere

Filed under
Sci/Tech

itwire.com: A total solar eclipse will begin in northern Canada early Friday morning, and sweep through Greenland, the Arctic, Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial solar eclipse will be seen in the northeastern parts of North America, and much of Europe and Asia.

What’s next in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (part 2)

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Here’s the final installment of Bill Nottingham’s series based on the talk he gave at this year’s Red Hat Summit. Find out about the latest and greatest Fedora™ developments… and the future of Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® from this experienced engineer.

Working With Firefox Spell-Checking Tools

Filed under
Moz/FF

bmighty.com/blog: When you work online, words are like clothes: Use them carelessly, and you might as well show up for a business meeting in dirty flip-flops and an "I'm with stupid" T-shirt. Fortunately, Firefox makes it easy to spruce up your online "wardrobe" with all sorts of language-enhancing features.

Is it possible that the Linux Desktop is going to surpass the Mac in use?

Filed under
Linux

scienceblogs.com: We can assume that Shuttleworth is being optimistic and pro-Linux because he is so invested in it. So I won't write off what he has to say, but we will not be surprised at his exuberance. Vaughan-Nichols bothers to make a comparison between the Mac system and the Linux system and bases his conclusion on that. Sorry, Stevo, but that's dumb.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more

Fedora and Red Hat's Finances

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.