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Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Debian mourns the loss of Thiemo Seufer

Filed under
Obits

debian.org: The Debian Project has lost an active member of its community. Thiemo Seufer died on December 26th in a tragic car accident.

The Future Of The Netbook?

Filed under
Hardware
  • The Future Of The Netbook?

  • What’s the Allure of these Netbooks?
  • Are Netbooks the Future of PCs?
  • Cease and Desist: the netbook war of words
  • MSI Wind

Use sidux 2008-04 for a "Cool Yule"!

Filed under
Linux

usalug-org.blogspot: I have been promoting sidux for a while now, and sidux 2008-04 is one of their best yet. Decked out in Yuletide green, with a white ground cover, sidux 2008-04 is one cool desktop system for the Yuletide season. Why do I like sidux so much?

We already had the year of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: For me, it's been the 'year' of the Linux desktop since 1995. That's when I started using Linux on a regular basis. My first distribution was Slackware. Slackware is still around, and it's still a fine Linux for people like me who came to Linux from Unix.

A Computer Genius, His Russian Bride, The KGB, Intrigue And Murder

Filed under
Reiser

cbsnews.com: A new "48 Hours Mystery" segment on the Hans Reiser case will air this Saturday, Jan. 3 on CBS. Check your local listings for the nighttime program. The segment features interviews with Reiser and his former best friend, Sean Sturgeon.

10 Linux Predictions for 2009

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • 10 Linux Predictions for 2009

  • Open source trends in 2009
  • Will 2009 Be Open or Closed?
  • Worst open-source predictions of 2008
  • Enterprise Linux 2008: The year in review

Cussing and Praising Kubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.linuxtoday: I took the plunge and decided to upgrade my two Gutsy boxes to Hardy. These are real working PCs, not experimental test boxes, so I was hoping for a straightforward dist-upgrade that preserved all of my settings and applications.

Full Circle Magazine - Issue #20 Available

Filed under
Ubuntu

That’s right, we’ve made it to the twentieth issue of Full Circle! It’s great to have been around this long and to have helped the Ubuntu community for so long. Here’s hoping that we get to Issue 40.

Kernel Mode-Setting Push For Linux 2.6.29 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: David Airlie has just called upon Linus Torvalds to pull the kernel mode-setting framework and Intel KMS driver support into the Linux 2.6.29 kernel.

Interclue and the pitfalls of going proprietary

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The Interclue extension is supposed to give you a preview of links in Firefox before you visit them, saving you mouse-clicks and, with a little luck, allowing you to move quickly between multiple links on the same page. Unfortunately, the determination to monetize the add-on and keep its source code closed results in elaborations that make the basic idea less effective.

The six-figure Linux job

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Since Linux is free, you’d think that the developers working with it are working for free too, right? Not so according to a piece on itcareerplanet.com.

Review: GoblinX 2.7

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: GoblinX is a LiveCD distribution built around Slackware Linux, and designed for ease of use. The flexibility of GoblinX is worthy of mention, as even its boot options show this ability. But is GoblinX an angel in disguise, or a troll under the bridge? Let's find out.

Review: Linux Mint 6

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxnewb.com: Linux Mint is one of those distributions you just can't help but love. Easy to use, stable, flexible, and so much more. Built from Ubuntu, it's been my mantra for a while that Linux Mint is “Ubuntu done right.”

openSuSE 11.1: KDE still kills it.

Filed under
SUSE

techiemoe.com: SuSE and I have a long and generally pleasant history. At least, that was the story with SuSE up until version 10.3. At that point, things started to go decidedly downhill, and it hasn't been until relatively recently that I'm beginning to feel comfortable again.

Fluxbox - Ultra-Fast/Simple Linux GUI

Filed under
Fluxbox

pcmech.com: One of the big perks of using a Linux distribution is having a choice of what window manager you want to use. The one I’ll be concentrating on is fluxbox, a window manager.

ThinkPad X300 and Linux - first impressions and power consumption issues

Filed under
Hardware

blog.gwright.org: Today I got down and installed Ubuntu 8.10 on this new X300, and things went rather smoothly. In terms of things that work, the list is rather good. However, I have noticed a few problems.

What's in a Number?

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: There's been a certain excitement in the blogosphere around the release of some figures about Firefox's market share in Europe. One thing that few seem to have picked up on is the unsatisfactory methodology behind these numbers.

Why games are the key to Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

blog.andrewmin.com: I just ordered my first computer yesterday. It’s a real he-man’s gaming computer. But while these were all expensive (especially the video card), none of them compared to one item on the list: Windows. That’s the hope that Linux companies must look forward to.

Hands-on Linux: New versions of Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: When you're talking Linux, three big names always pop up: Canonical's Ubuntu, Novell's openSUSE and Red Hat's Fedora. Each of these "big three" has recently released a new version of its distribution, which means it's time to check them out and decide which is No 1.

Look Back at KDE 2008

Filed under
KDE

digested.blogspot: The big news this year is the beginning of the KDE 4 series. On January 11, 2008 KDE 4.0 was released. KDE 4.1 was released on July 29, 2008.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more