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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Firefox 2.0.0.4 and 1.5.0.12 Released (End-of-Life for 1.5.x)

Filed under
Moz/FF

CyberNetNews: Today is a big day for Mozilla because it marks the last version of Firefox 1.5 that will ship. This last release was definitely necessary though since Mozilla had never prompted 1.5.x users to upgrade to Firefox 2, but that is about to change.

60 days with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Batteries Not Included: I have been using Ubuntu for approximately 2 months now. This has been a fairly monogamous relationship, I think I booted Windows all of twice. So, what does it feel like?

It's Wedding Season, and OpenOffice.org Is Here For You

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: Who wants to pay for someone else to make your wedding invitations? (Or programs, or whatever.) Use OpenOffice for your wedding invitations. This of course prompts the objection, "But there aren't any templates in OpenOffice."

Short Overview: Current State of Mesa and OpenGL on Linux

Filed under
Software

/home/liquidat: Most free X.Org graphic drivers are based on Mesa, which is a free OpenGL specification implementation. However, while OpenGL is already in Version 2.1 the Mesa implementation only supports version 1.5. This is to change soon - but OpenGL will make new releases as well.

A New Vector For Hackers -- Firefox Add-Ons

Filed under
Security

Washington Post: Makers of some of the most popular extensions, or "add-ons," for Mozilla's Firefox Web browser may have inadvertently introduced security holes that criminals could use to steal sensitive data from millions of users.

nBox - Envision your network with nBox (Embedded Ntop)

Filed under
HowTos

The life of a systems or network administrator requires us to maintain an expansive understanding of our network infrastructure to more effectively manage it.

Comparing GNU/Linux and FreeBSD

Filed under
OS

Free Software Mag: GNU/Linux is the most popular operating system built with free/open source software. However, it is not the only one: FreeBSD is also becoming popular for its stability, robustness and security. In this article, I’ll take a look at their similarities and differences.

Installing Liberation fonts on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic: Red Hat recently released a set of free fonts designed to be a metrically-exact replacement for the Microsoft Core TrueType fonts. Installing fonts on Linux, however, has not always been the easiest of tasks so Tectonic dug around a little to make a simple guide to installing these, and other, fonts on most flavours of Linux.

Kiosktool locks down KDE users' desktops

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: Recently I wrote about locking down the GNOME desktop environment with Pessulus. In this article, I'll show you how to do the same for KDE, using Kiosktool, a front end for changing the KDE configuration files in users' home folders and the /etc/kde* folders.

Trickle: A lightweight userspace bandwidth shaper.

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Sometimes, you’ll want to download something but you don’t want it to completely saturate your Internet connection. Perhaps you’re already downloading something more important, or you simply don’t want to get in the way of other people that are sharing the same Internet connection. Enter Trickle.

openSUSE to compete with Edubuntu?

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

ZDNet: At first blush, the new offering, with a proposed release this fall, appears to have the makings of a serious competitor. Designed as an add-on “EDU-CD” to accompany the upcoming 10.3 release of openSUSE, the so-called “SLEducator” is designed to “[ease] the installation and configuration of an educational network and student desktop.

Kernel space: On-demand readahead

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: "Readahead" is the act of speculatively reading a portion of a file's contents into memory in the expectation that a process working with that file will soon want that data. When readahead works well, a data-consuming process will find that the information it needs is available to it when it asks, and that waiting for disk I/O is not necessary.

Making Debian packages from commercial software

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: One of my main goals for a managed infrastructure is to make sure I have consistent versions of end-user applications installed everywhere. It was time to make Debian-style packages of the big, expensive third-party stuff.

Owning computers via spelling mistakes

Filed under
Security

infoworld: Symantec researchers have detailed a painfully simple attack method that hackers may already be using to bypass security protections and break into UNIX and Linux-based computers.

Satisfying the Vocal Minority - Why it Matters

Filed under
Ubuntu

pronetadvertising: Though the move may not 'directly' result in a significant amount of sales, from a marketing perspective this will help momentously in terms of getting Dell's name out there.

Open source lizard stands guard

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

australianit: MOZILLA chief Mitchell Baker prefers to call herself the company's "chief lizard wrangler", a reference to the organisation's original dinosaur logo and to the difficulties of managing a company that has 90 official staff but a volunteer workforce of 200,000.

Hans Reiser murder trial postponed for second time

Filed under
Reiser

MercuryNews: The trial of a computer programmer who is facing charges that he murdered his wife was delayed for a second time today because his lawyer is busy with another case.

Linux server market share keeps growing

Filed under
Linux

Linux-Watch: The server market is back, and Linux is helping, IDC reports. Linux servers posted their second consecutive quarter of double-digit growth and now represent 12.7 percent of the overall server market, or $1.6 billion for the first quarter of 2007.

StarOffice, Linux fly high on Singapore Airlines

Filed under
Software

Desktop Linux: Singapore Airlines is offering access to Sun's StarOffice 8 office productivity suite free of charge to passengers on its new Boeing 777-300ER aircraft. StarOffice, Sun's proprietary version of OpenOffice.org, runs on the aircraft's Linux server and is accessed via a seat-back terminal at each passenger's seat, according to Sun.

Worst-Case Scenario or Sure Shot? - More on the Novell-MS Deal

Filed under
SUSE

Groklaw: I see a number of journalists have now read the patent peace agreement and the accompanying technical and marketing agreements that Novell filed on Friday with its 10K. Kevin Murphy in his CBR Online article, Novell outlines GPLv3 worst-case scenario, noticed that this seems discordant with what Novell told him in March. Obviously, something doesn't match up.

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Linux 4.10-rc5

Things seem to be calming down a bit, and everything looks nominal. There's only been about 250 changes (not counting merges) in the last week, and the diffstat touches less than 300 files (with drivers and architecture updates being the bulk, but there's tooling, networking and filesystems in there too). Read more Also: Linus Torvalds Announces Fifth Linux 4.10 Kernel RC, Everything Looks Nominal Linux 4.10-rc5 Released, Now Codenamed "Anniversary Edition"

Fedora 26 Linux to Enable TRIM for Better Performance of Encrypted SSD Disks

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New CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Linux Kernel Security Updates Pushed Into Beta

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is informing users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 enterprise-ready operating systems to upgrade their kernel packages immediately if they are using the Beta channel. Read more

KDE Neon Installer

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    KDE Neon has adopted distro-agnostic Linux installer ‘Calamares’ its unstable developer edition. Calamares replaces the Canonical-developed Ubiquity installer as the default graphical installer used when installing the Ubuntu-based OS on a new machine. The stylish install wizard is already in use on a number of other KDE-based Linux distributions, including Chakra Linux and Netrunner.
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