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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Poll My Main Computer srlinuxx 3 17/11/2012 - 11:51pm
Story Why Linus Torvalds would rather code than make money srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 11:47pm
Blog entry The EE Nokia Lumia 920 fieldyweb 17/11/2012 - 11:11pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 6:44pm
Story Long-Term Review: openSUSE 12.2 KDE srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 2:54am
Story The Problem of Menus srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 2:52am
Story A Tour of Linux Gaming srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 2:50am
Story Linux In Enterprises, Market Share And Business Which Use Linux srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 2:47am
Story German city says OpenOffice shortcomings are forcing it back to Microsoft srlinuxx 17/11/2012 - 2:45am
Story Netflix on Ubuntu Is Here srlinuxx 16/11/2012 - 9:48pm

No OLPCs for Cuba or enemies of the US

Filed under
OLPC

tech.blorge: The US and Cuba don’t get along so well, in so far as it is illegal for US citizens to travel to Cuba. The OLPC (One laptop per child) was developed to provide cheap computers to children in developing nations. Cuba among other countries will not be getting them, ever.

Mandriva sponsoring aKademy 2007, handing out free Flashes

Filed under
MDV

adamw’s blog: Cool news: we’re sponsoring aKademy 2007 (the KDE developers’ / users’ conference) at the Silver level, and as if that wasn’t enough, we’re also handing out free Mandriva Flashes to the developers attending the conference.

full circle magazine Issue 2 ready

Filed under
Ubuntu

Issue 2 of the Ubuntu -centric monthly electronic magazine has been released. This month's highlights include: Flavour of the Month - Kubuntu. How-To - Ubuntu on the Intel Mac Mini, and Ubuntu for your Grandma!

EU support for open source software

Filed under
OSS

ec.europa.eu: An EU-funded consortium will address one of the perceived barriers for the adoption of open source software and prove once and for all that software which is free and publishes its source code, is capable of outperforming anything else on the market.

OpenBSD founder: Intel leaves open-source out in the cold

Filed under
Hardware

ZDNet Blogs: OpenBSD founder Theo de Raadt wants Intel to come clean on the severity of bugs in the Intel Core 2 processors, warning that some of the bugs “will *ASSUREDLY* be exploitable from userland code.”

Rsync backup solutions

Filed under
Software

blog.lxpages.com: To setup a quick and efficient backup system, all you need is rsync and that’s it. Rsync is a very powerful tool that can do anything and everything that has to do with moving files around within and across different networks and securely.

Options in OpenOffice.org Calc

Filed under
HowTos

LinuxJournal: Like other OpenOffice.org applications, Calc has several dozen options in how it is formatted and operates. Some of the tabs for these options resemble those found in other OpenOffice.org applications. Others are unique to Calc and the business of spreadsheets. Either way, the more you know about Calc's options, the more you can take control of your work.

Linux contributor base broadens

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: As the number of Linux kernel contributors continues to grow, core developers are finding themselves mostly managing and checking, not coding, said Greg Kroah-Hartman, maintainer of USB and PCI support in Linux and co-author of Linux Device Drivers, in a talk at the Linux Symposium in Ottawa Thursday.

Also: Day one at the Ottawa Linux Symposium

GIMP tricks: Rotating Sphere with GAP

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: This article shows how to create an rotating sphere in GIMP with GAP plugin. Basic knowledge of this graphics manipulation suite will be required to successfully follow the tutorial.

Linux to the White House in 2008?

Filed under
Linux

itbusiness: Is operating system preference a presidential predictor? Blogger Douglas Karr pondered the question over the weekend. He didn’t come up with a definitive answer, but he does predict that Linux will win the 2008 presidential election.

AMD 8.38.7 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: The train has gone off the tracks. In The Truth About ATI/AMD & Linux, AMD's Matthew Tippett had shared with us that the AMD driver release cycle is like a train and that "...we are on the train, and to add a new carriage or update the carriage, we have to do it while the train is running, without stopping the train, or letting anything fall off."

Over 5,500 Projects Slated to Adopt GPL 3

Filed under
OSS

internetnews.com: The official final release of the GPL is still a day away, but it's possible that over 5,500 projects could be migrating to it in very quickly.

Introducing PCLinuxOS Business Edition

Filed under
PCLOS

We offer a Desktop solution that is primarily geared to the SOHO, one man shop/business where everything can be done right on your one machine. There are all the business oriented applications you could want, from word processing to graphics production, making bar code labels to spreadsheets and databases.

Is Linux Splitting into Two Factions?

Filed under
Linux

Kevin Carmony: With the recent news of several Linux vendors entering into partnership agreements with Microsoft (Novell, Linspire, Xandros), there has been much debate recently about two factions of Linux forming. Saying that Linux is going to be torn in two, makes for good press and lively debates, but this is certainly nothing new for Linux.

Also: Is a Linux Civil War in the Making?

Is Red Hat the pot calling the kettle black?

Filed under
Linux

opensourcelearning.info: My my. Who would have thought that Microsoft actually would dominate the discussions in the world of Linux and Open Source. In an interview with Reuters, Szulik declined to say whether his company is now in negotiations with Microsoft over signing such a patent agreement. “I can’t answer the question,” he said.

Also: Slashdot gets it wrong again

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2 Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

LinuxLookup: Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2, which will in time become Ubuntu 7.10 has just been released for testing. Pre-releases of Gutsy are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system.

Also: Why you should be excited about Ubuntu 7.10
And: Screenshots

TurboLinux Wizpy Review

Filed under
Hardware

Linuxlookup.com has just reviewed the TurboLinux Wizpy. This handheld mp3 player meets USB thumb-drive may be small in stature, but offers a versatile solution for anyone looking for portable web browsing, email, office software and media on the go. In this review we're going to introduce you to the main functions and features of the Wizpy product, but does it truly have a place on the market?

Prof Fizzwizzle and the Molten Mystery - A beautiful puzzle game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

AllAboutLinux: Remember the time when I reviewed a very beautiful game called FizzBall which runs on Linux and which was developed by a young gaming company called Grubby games ? Well, they have released yet another game called "Prof. Fizzwizzle and the Molten Mystery" - this time a game of puzzles.

How the New OpenOffice Chart Tool Works When You Don't Specify a Data Range

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: If you choose Insert > Chart in Calc, in the new tool, without a range selected, it's not much use. You get a big blank chart. In Writer, however, at least in this stage of development of the tool, you get something different.

Yoper 3.0 requires some tinkering

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linux.com: Yoper claims to be a high-performance Linux distribution optimized for newer processors. I tested a beta of Yoper 3.0 on my desktop a year ago and was so impressed that when 3.0 was released this month, I installed it on my new Hewlett-Packard Pavilion dv6105 notebook. Using it, however, left me disappointed.

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

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When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

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