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Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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openSUSE 11.0: Package installation 743% faster for default patterns

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org (coolo): We implemented some very interesting features for openSUSE 11.0 to make the installation easier and faster:

Mark Shuttleworth: Playing nicely with Windows

Filed under
Linux

markshuttleworth.com: Windows is a very important platform, and our justifiable pride in Linux and the GNU stack shouldn’t blind us to the importance of delivering software that is widely useful. I believe in bringing free software to people in a way that is exciting and empowering to them, and one of the key ways to do that is to show them amazing free software running on their familiar platform, whether that’s Windows or the MacOS.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Before Switching Your Linux Distro

  • How To Get .docx Working in Linux
  • Sign & Encrypt your Emails with Thunderbird/Enigmail
  • Encrypt / Sign your Email in Evolution
  • Export Kmail into Thunderbird
  • How to Auto Login to Ubuntu
  • Speed up Gnome in Ubuntu: Tip2
  • Share your music with other computers in the house
  • Ubuntu Server Guide: Part 1
  • Testing the new "gold" linker from binutils

Mandriva presents its latest distribution: Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring (Updated)

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MDV

mandriva.com: Mandriva, the leading European Linux distributor, today announces the launch of Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring, the major new release of Mandriva Linux, featuring hundreds of improvements which make for a quicker and more powerful distribution that is easier to use than ever.

Lots to See at the Apache Foundation's European Conference

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Today marks the beginning of ApacheCon EU, the European conference for and about technologies sponsored by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). While I am not at the conference, I wanted to take the opportunity to post about the ASF and a number of the technologies that it has helped to create and promote.

Linux developers look to break out

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Linux

statesman.com: The Linux community can churn out software code at a fearsome pace. Hundreds of them have come to Austin this week for the Linux Foundation's collaboration summit. For much of Tuesday, Linux developers, analysts and users took a look at the opportunities and challenges they face in pushing the free, open-source software to a more mainstream audience.

Review: PC-BSD 1.5

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BSD

raiden.net: PC-BSD, a strong contender for the top desktop distribution out there, has once again grown, going from version 1.3 to 1.5 in just under a year. In that time it's grown, prospered, and had it's fair share of growing pains as well. But version 1.5 is only one subversion up from the previous version 1.4 that we reviewed. So what makes version 1.5 better than its predecessors and worth a look from us? Well, let's have a look.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 17

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SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Issue 17 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue:
openSUSE-Education 1.0 RC2 for openSUSE 10.3 is Ready, Tips and Tricks: Quick host-to-host transfer, and Stephan Binner: openSUSE’s KDE 4.0.3 Packages.

RE: Nine Improvements Needed in KDE, by Bruce Byfield

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KDE

Aaron J Seigo: Thanks for trying KDE 4.0.x and then writing about it. It's always great when people try something for a while and then give their honest opinion on things. I'd like to address some of the issues you raise, so let's start where you started:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Mozilla Developer News April 8

  • Open source will not save education
  • Why Linux Desktop Fragmentation is a Good Thing
  • State of the Linux union is sound
  • IDC bullish on Linux in the enterprise
  • Red Hat's business model: the "elevator speech" version (video)
  • Here Comes the Open Source Metaverse
  • Asus avoids Atom to get next Eee PC out early?
  • An opportunity to End Software Patents: ESP briefs Court in its historic rehearing of the Bilski case
  • The brazilian Election Supreme Court migrates 430 thousand voting machines to GNU / Linux
  • Fresh blood - the new fight for open source
  • A world of beautiful broken toys
  • I Don’t Like KDE4 in Ubuntu / Kubuntu Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Usage And Compile Help For Linux/Unix Network Port Shell Program

  • Using rsync to back up my laptop
  • Use OTR to Encrypt Pidgin Conversations
  • How to try Ubuntu without messing with your existing OS?
  • Selecting two or more drawing objects in an OpenOffice Writer document
  • Working with Linux Services
  • Howto install Cinelerra in ubuntu gutsy gibbon
  • How to install Savage 2: A Tortured Soul on Linux
  • Detect intruders on your network with Snort
  • VirtualBox Exploit - How to Share your USB key between Ubuntu and Windows
  • Hidden Linux : New OOo
  • Basic linux concepts and command
  • Google Gadgets and Web Widgets on Your Desktop with Screenlets

Maybe it's not Mandriva, maybe it's not Fedora, maybe it's GNOME 2.22 (screwed)

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Software

beranger.org: As Mandriva Spring has been made available to the early seeders, it means all the Cooker packages as of today are already Mandriva 2008 Spring, right? So the updated Mandriva system I am running is actually Mandriva 2008 Spring, right? I have some bad news in this case...

The Leader of the Pack? Hands-On Video of the HP 2133 Mini-Note

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Hardware

blog.laptopmag.com: HP is offering four different SKUs including ones with a SuSE Linux OS. We have had our hands on the $749 version for a few weeks now. To our surprise, our little system ran Microsoft Vista without a hiccup.

Linux, the Next Battleground for Closed Source Software Development

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Linux

ostatic.com: From the recent spate of open source project acquisitions by large software vendors to the increasingly popular model of offering paid “enterprise” versions of open source software, we’ve all noticed the changes in the open source community. Some consider these trends part of the maturing of the open source software market, while others view these trends as potentially dangerous to fundamental open source concepts. Things may have just gotten worse.

Interview: Jeremy Katz on Fedora Live CDs

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Linux
Interviews

Red Hat Magazine: This interview is the first of a series we’ll be co-publishing with Fedora Interviews. In this one, Jeremy Katz talks about improvements to Fedora Live CDs.

Open Source Day at Microsoft

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Microsoft

openlogic.com/blogs: Over at Microsoft, they've just celebrated their first Open Source Day. I think Jamie Cannon was right when he (she?) joked that "Hell has frozen over". All along, I've been expecting the standard response and outcome: first they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win. It looks like we're on the right track.

Dutch UMPC runs Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

linuxdevices.com: Dutch integrator Van Der Led (VDL) Designs has announced a clone of the Asus Eee PC ultra-mini PC (UMPC) notebook. The WiFi-enabled "Jisus" UMPC is equipped with a Chinese-made 1GHz Loongson CPU, has an 8.9-inch display, and runs Ubuntu Linux.

Jury Can Consider Lesser 'Manslaughter' Verdict, Reiser Judge Rules

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Reiser

blog.wired.com: The judge in the Hans Reiser murder trial ruled here Tuesday that jurors may consider a lesser charge of voluntary manslaughter against the Linux coder. Jurors are expected to begin deliberating next week after they hear from a computer forensics specialist who will testify on Monday.

Of Microsoft, GNU/Linux and Boiled Asses' Heads

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxjournal.com: There are many ways of peering into the future. Me, I prefer to stick with the tried-and-trusted method of reading between the lines of Microsoft press releases.

Separating Suspend and Hibernation

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "The following three patches are intended to start the redesign of the suspend and hibernation framework for devices," began Rafael Wysocki. He noted that the first patch introduces new callbacks for suspend and hibernation, while the other two patches implement the new suspend and hibernation callbacks for the platform and PCI bus types.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Google, Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), Quad9 and More

  • Google investigators find hackers swipe nearly 250,000 passwords a week
    Hackers are constantly trying to break into Google accounts, so Google researchers spent a year tracing how hackers steal passwords and expose them on the internet's black market. To gather hard evidence about the tools hackers use to swipe passwords, Google collaborated with University of California Berkeley cybersecurity experts to track activity on some of these markets. On Thursday, they published their results.
  • Time Will Tell if the New Vulnerabilities Equities Process Is a Step Forward for Transparency
    The White House has released a new and apparently improved Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), showing signs that there will be more transparency into the government’s knowledge and use of zero day vulnerabilities. In recent years, the U.S. intelligence community has faced questions about whether it “stockpiles” vulnerabilities rather than disclosing them to affected companies or organizations, and this scrutiny has only ramped up after groups like the Shadow Brokers have leaked powerful government exploits. According to White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce, the form of yesterday’s release and the revised policy itself are intended to highlight the government’s commitment to transparency because it’s “the right thing to do.”
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Quad9 Secure DNS Service Embeds IBM Security Intelligence
  • New “Quad9” DNS service blocks malicious domains for everyone
    The Global Cyber Alliance (GCA)—an organization founded by law enforcement and research organizations to help reduce cyber-crime—has partnered with IBM and Packet Clearing House to launch a free public Domain Name Service system. That system is intended to block domains associated with botnets, phishing attacks, and other malicious Internet hosts—primarily targeted at organizations that don't run their own DNS blacklisting and whitelisting services. Called Quad9 (after the 9.9.9.9 Internet Protocol address the service has obtained), the service works like any other public DNS server (such as Google's), except that it won't return name resolutions for sites that are identified via threat feeds the service aggregates daily.
  • The Internet of Shit is so manifestly insecure that people are staying away from it in droves
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: November 16, 2017
  • Hacking Blockchain with Smart Contracts to Control a Botnet
    Blockchain has been hailed by some in the technology industry as a potential method to help improve cyber security. However, security researcher Majid Malaika warns that Blockchain can potentially be abused to enable a new form of botnet that would be very difficult to take down. Malaika detailed his Blockchain-powered botnet in a session at the SecTor security conference on Nov. 15. The overall attack method has been dubbed "Botract" by Malaika, as it abuses inherent functionality in the smart contracts that help to enable Blockchain.
  • What Can The Philosophy of Unix Teach Us About Security?

Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

  • R600 Gallium3D Shader Image Support Lands, Other R600g Patches Pending
    As a follow-up to OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g, the patches have landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git! Plus other R600g patches are on the mailing list for review. These shader image support patches for R600g expose OpenGL's ARB_shader_image_size and ARB_shader_image_load_store for Radeon HD 5000/6000 series. In the process, this ends up taking Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs to having OpenGL 4.2 compliance from 4.1 with the shader image support having been the last blocker. Other GPUs on R600g remain at OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 support, as outlined more extensively in that previous article.
  • GeForce GTX 900 Series Re-Clocking Patches Updated By Karol Herbst
    Frequent Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver contributor Karol Herbst has posted his latest patch series in working towards GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" graphics processor re-clocking.
  • 25 More AMDGPU DC Patches, Mostly Focused On Raven DCN
    DCN in this context is for current the DCN 1.0 Raven Ridge family of display engines. The just-launched Vega+Zen APUs feature a new display engine and that's what this DCN code is for, which is also under a separate Kconfig tunable from the rest of AMDGPU DC.

Development of Linux 4.15

  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15
    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.
  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15
    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening. Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.
  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code
    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

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