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Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Installing The IBM Lotus Symphony Beta 1 Office Suite On Ubuntu 7.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to set up IBM Lotus Symphony Beta 1 on Ubuntu 7.04. IBM Lotus Symphony is an office-suite that is based on OpenOffice.org.

Ubuntu Desktop not used in business

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwriting.com: I got a telling reponse from Canonical when I approached its Public Relations team looking for case studies of businesses that had switched from Windows: Ubuntu desktop is largely in the consumer space not business.

NERO game evolves to version 2.0

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Last year, we reviewed Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives (NERO), a unique game in which players train forces of autonomous bots, then pit those forces against each other in hands-off, artificial intelligence (AI)-only competitions. NERO spawned a new major release a few weeks ago, and like its eponymous operatives, it has learned some new moves over time.

OpenOffice TIFF flaw affects Windows, Linux and Mac

Filed under
Security
OOo

builder.au: Security experts have discovered TIFF-based buffer overflow vulnerabilities in OpenOffice, which could allow attackers to remotely execute code on Linux, Windows or Apple Mac-based computers.

There's a new GNOME in town

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: GNOME 2.20 was officially released last week after six months of development. The new version includes strong incremental improvements that contribute to a better user experience and provide more flexibility and integration opportunities for third-party software developers. This article explores some of the new features in GNOME 2.20 and GTK 2.12.

The 7 Most Influential GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement: GNU/Linux offers a bewildering variety of flavors -- or distributions, as they're called. To a newcomer's eye, many of these seem virtually identical to each other. Here, in alphabetical order, is a list of the seven distributions that have most affected GNU/Linux as a whole:

Why desktop Linux really hasn’t (yet) succeeded

Filed under
Linux

zdnet blogs: The most important reason you don’t see Linux desktops everywhere you look is that Linux desktop applications aren’t generally compelling.

GPLv3 shunned, survey says

Filed under
OSS

infoworld blogs: Just 6 percent of developers working with open-source software have adopted the new GNU General Public License version 3, an Evans Data survey has found.

Negative Press about Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

LoCo About Ubuntu!: There really has been some good reviews of Ubuntu, as well as editorials, but in the past week or so there seems to have been a mini-explosion of anti-Ubuntu articles. They seem to be coming from two groups of people.

IBM's Symphony Hitting Wrong Notes, Reviewers Say

Filed under
Software

pcworld.com: Early user reviews of IBM's new Lotus Symphony office software suite are unlikely to be music to IBM's ears. "Overall, I don't see this as an Office killer," blogged a tester.

some howtos, shorts, and leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Howto: SSH without a password

  • Obscure Linux Commands: Cheating At Word Games
  • Key Authentication for SSH with GUI Configuration in Fedora and Ubuntu
  • Six Keys to the Success of Desktop Linux
  • Pamela Jones gets gong
  • steveno: Debian
  • steveno: Wolvix
  • openSUSE 10.3 almost ready
  • OpenSuse 10.3 is a dissapointment
  • Qtparted - a graphical partition editor

Will Linux Ever be a Popular Desktop Product?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Linux, although it’s highly touted as a more secure and reliable operating system, simply won’t work in my environment. I suppose I could consider Linux for my servers, but not for my desktops. In fact, I’ve seen it reported that Linux is running on eight of the ten most reliable Web Hosting Servers. But for desktop systems, Linux is almost nowhere to be seen.

Ubuntu Gutsy’s new default wallpaper

Filed under
Ubuntu

lunapark: Over the weekend Ubuntu released the likely default wallpaper for their next release Gutsy 7.10 (coming in October). Although it’s only a wallpaper, it does help to mold the first impressions.

Get into KDE Hacking

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: A couple of blog entries back a reader left this comment: About kde hacking though, I'm in the first year of a computer science program that I don't think is going to touch on anything kde related, Where should I start if I wanted to get into kde hacking? Pick up the qt 4 manual, or something else?

Why I Haven't Reviewed Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: Every time I write a review I get comments and e-mails asking me to review Puppy Linux. Puppy has lots of people who really seem to love and zealously support the distro. I invariably download a copy (most recently 2.17) and try and run it. I invariably give up on it very quickly.

Generic Filesystem Caching Facility

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "The attached patch adds a generic intermediary (FS-Cache) by which filesystems may call on local caching capabilities, and by which local caching backends may make caches available," explained David Howells describing his "generic filesystem caching facility" patch.

PC-BSD 1.4 Released

Filed under
BSD

pcbsd.org: The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 1.4 (da Vinci edition)! Some highlights include Xorg 7.2, KDE 3.5.7, and Compiz-Fusion 0.5.2.

LugRadio Returns With Season 5

Filed under
Linux

jonobacon: Today the LugRadio team are proud to announce opening of Season 5 with the very first episode entitled All Things Happen In Fives. This is not just any old season though, we have two new presenters, Adam Sweet and Chris Procter, a brand new website, some new promotional photography and we are also going to be doing more live shows with Season 5.

Marcel Marceau, Renowned Mime, Dies at 84

Filed under
Obits

nytimes: Marcel Marceau, the wiry French mime who mostly performed as the chalk-faced Bip and did much to revive the art of pantomime, died Saturday in France. He was 84.

Looking for Algae--the Next Voyage

Filed under
Misc

Jon maddog Hall: Algae is very important to our lives. It is estimated that 73% to 87% of the net global production of oxygen is produced by algae. It is at the bottom of the food chain. How does this fit in with computing?

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More in Tux Machines

Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE