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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian 6.0: LXDE Menus srlinuxx 1 15/09/2011 - 3:24pm
Story How To Create A Debian Wheezy (Testing) OpenVZ Template falko 15/09/2011 - 8:19am
Story Gnome 3.2 srlinuxx 15/09/2011 - 4:27am
Story Perens tries to bridge gap on copyright srlinuxx 15/09/2011 - 4:23am
Story Dyne:bolic GNU/Linux hits version 3 srlinuxx 15/09/2011 - 4:20am
Story Distro review : Dragora GNU/Linux srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 11:29pm
Story Why You Should Join Diaspora Now, Like Your Freedom Depends On It srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 10:32pm
Story Events I’d like to see srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 10:30pm
Story Hands-on with Windows 8: srlinuxx 2 14/09/2011 - 10:17pm
Story Revolutionizing desktops without causing user revolts srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 10:13pm

Ubuntu Goes Low Spec!

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As Ubuntu continues to make its presence known throughout the world, it was only a matter of time before the project spawned an offshoot variation or two that would enable people with lower-spec machines to participate in all that Ubuntu goodness.

CLI Magic: Zip your files across the network with Woof

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Woof is a temporary Web server that is invoked when you want to transfer files. When a file is on offer, the recipient can download it using a browser or through wget, a popular command-line download utility.

HDTV for Linux: New Options

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Once considered to be way too complicated for the newer Linux user, HDTV on a 'Nix box often times felt just out of reach for many. Then we found that hardware designed for Linux specifically was in the works. The card is known simply as the HD-5500.

Also: pcHDTV HD-5500 - HDTV for your Linux desktop

Firefox Site Gets a Relaunch

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We recently sat down with Mozilla technology strategist Mike Shaver, who explained the reasoning behind the site's overhaul. He hopes the enhancements will not only help developers shepherd their add-ons from prototype to finished product, but also make it easier for new users to discover new extensions.

Developing nations to test new $150 laptops

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From Brazil to Pakistan, some of the world's poorest children will peer across the digital divide this month -- reading electronic books, shooting digital video, creating music and chatting with classmates online.

Goodbye, PCs; Hello, Linux

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By using customized Linux pxe-bootable images and any pxe-bootable machine, including thin clients, and adding a multihead video card, you can make PCs and the fat operating system history.

Fixing software suspend / hibernate with uswsusp in Ubuntu Feisty (and Edgy)

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After upgrading to Feisty, my new favorite feature suspend-to-disk (aka hibernate) was broken badly; basically, the resume would never be found, so it’d act as if it had a corrupted swap partition and unmounted disks.

SLAX 6.0.0 Pre 3 Screenshots

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SLAX is one of our favorite mini Linux LiveCD distributions so when SLAX 6.0.0 Pre 3 recently came out we couldn't help but to try out the new SLAX 6. New in this third pre-release of the SLAX 6.0 LiveCD is the Linux 2.6.20 kernel, bootable LiveUSB support in both Linux and Windows, udev replaces hotplug, full sound support with ALSA 1.0.14, NTFS read and write support, and more.


GNU/Solaris - dead in the water?

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The declaration by Linus Torvalds and other kernel developers that the Linux kernel will stay under its existing licence - the second version of the General Public License - and the talk being floated by Sun Microsystems that it likes the upcoming third revision of the GPL have led to much speculation that an official version of GNU/Solaris would arrive by the end of the year under the GPLv3.

Daily life with Ubuntu

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I wanted to post this just for those who might be considering running Ubuntu Linux. This is from my experience as a desktop user, and day to day activity:

Half Life 2 on Linux

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Half Life 2 is a highly popular science fiction First-Person Shooter (FPS) game. It has won numerous awards for advances in computer animation, computer graphics, sound, physics, and artificial intelligence. Half Life 2 has been developed for and it is mainly played on Windows PCs. But recent advances in the Windows emulation software Wine have made it possible to run it on Linux as well.

Linux: New Intel PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Driver

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James Ketrenos announced a new 80211 based driver for the Intel PRO/Wireless 3945ABG Network Connection adapter. He explains, "this new driver uses the new d80211 subsystem previously only available as part of the wireless-dev tree."

Mix Libre

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It's a mixed bag this week from Studio Dave. I'll skip the preliminaries and just invite you to dive in and check out some of the latest news from the ever-expanding world of Linux sound and music software. There's far more going on than I can possibly cover in my allotted space, but here's a quick survey of some recent remarkable activity.

Open Outcast Tech Demo released

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Released on February 10th, 2007. The first tech demo contains two small levels to walk around, no plot. Open Outcast was started out of frustration of Outcast Fans, cause Outcast2 was cancelled.

New Help Center for Ubuntu

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We’ve been working on a better way to present help to users for the next version of Ubuntu. The result has now been uploaded to Feisty.

OpenSuse 10.2

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I remember installing a Linux distro for the first time back in April 2000. I was shocked with the number of applications that came out of the box. Forward to 2007, and I go buy ‘Linux For You’ and they give Open Suse 10.2 - As expected I was curious.

Samba: How to share files for your LAN without user/password

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This tutorial will show how to set samba to allow read-only file sharing for your LAN computers as guest (without be prompted for a password).

Resolving Domains Internally And Externally With Bind9 And Caching Nameserver

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Sometimes, we are required to resolve our internal domains on a local nameserver and external (internet) domains on our ISP's nameserver. There are different solutions to this problem, but in this tutorial, we are going to solve it through configuring a combination of caching-nameserver and BIND 9.

Warly is leaving Mandriva!

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I joined Mandriva in 1999, after that Gael Duval asked me if I would like to work with him. I was there during the Internet boost, I was there during the chapter 11, and I will be there till the end of next week...

Artists needed for kdeedu/Kalzium

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If you have artistic skills and some free time I would really welcome your help! Per element one svg-file is needed, I would do the rest.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.