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About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME OS! srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 5:28pm
Story What's new in Linux 2.6.39 srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 3:28pm
Story Canonical’s Launchpad Streamlines Translation of Ubuntu srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 3:26pm
Story Red Hat releases Enterprise Linux 6.1 srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 3:24pm
Poll ??? srlinuxx 2 19/05/2011 - 2:17pm
Story The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 11.04 falko 19/05/2011 - 11:47am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 6:57am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 6:43am
Story Razing the Bazaar srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 6:42am
Story Interview with Ken Thompson srlinuxx 19/05/2011 - 4:08am

JBoss' Fleury Comes Out Swinging at Microsoft, Oracle

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat and its JBoss division came out swinging against the recent assault by Microsoft and Oracle on Red Hat's open-source middleware and operating system technology base.

Ubuntu Hacks

Filed under
Reviews

I have recently been reading a book called Ubuntu Hacks by Jonathan Oxer, Kyle Rankin & Bill Childers, published by O'Reilly and Associates. I didn't expect to become a Grand Ubuntu Master by reading a single book, but I was hoping to pick up a few tips and tricks. If you want to really get to know Ubuntu, then you should grab a copy of this book and follow the bouncing dot.

Using Webilder to display flickr photos as your Ubuntu/Debian desktop wallpaper

Filed under
HowTos

Webilder is a handy little program that allows you to download photos from flickr and import photos from webshots to display as backgrounds on your Linux desktop.

the ubuntu devconf

Filed under
Ubuntu

A week or so ago I went along to the Ubuntu Developer Summit at Google HQ. This sort of conversation makes me very cynical about the relevance of the OSDL and LSB. It was a shame that Mark Shuttleworth didn’t show up - his blog entry is the only reason I went along.

Cacti On An ISPConfig Server Within 10 Easy Steps

Filed under
HowTos

In this article I describe how to install and setup the Cacti in a ISPConfig Server. There aren't many differences from installing in other ISP Managers or standalone Apache installations. I tried many others solutions, but Cacti is very simple and fast to implement.

Review - Firefox 2

Filed under
Moz/FF

For some, their Web browser of choice is just as emotionally charged as their choice in operating systems. For the rest of us, there are several quality Web browsers to choose from, and Firefox 2 certainly holds its own.

Linux-running PS3 offered on eBay

Filed under
Linux

Want to run Linux on the PlayStation 3 but can't be bothered with the hassle of installing it? Then head over to online auction site eBay where one of Sony's next-generation consoles is on offer pre-loaded with Fedora Core 5 Linux.

Dell + Ubuntu ==> Disaster

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu will run fine after the installation. Windows XP will run too but not for long. And the useful Dell Utility Partition is gone (because the MBR has changed). You think you can fix it by FIXMBR and get the Windows NT Bootloader back. Great. You just mess up your harddisk further.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 178

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • News: Etch delay, Ubuntu and Mandriva software repositories, Fedora 6 usage statistics, security event auditing in FreeBSD 6.2

  • Released last week: Puppy Linux 2.12, Zenwalk Linux 4.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 10.2 RC1
  • New additions: Fluxbuntu, Linux Mint, PapugLinux, Ulteo
  • New distributions: Kids Without, Ubuntu Multimedia Center, YaKa
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

The Tron effect

Filed under
Misc

In 1982, I attended computer camp. I know, this sounds like a "One time, at band camp. . ." story, but it's not. This was computer camp. It took place at the little-known Eastern Oregon State College, and it was the first year EOSC offered computer camp.

Jabbering with Coccinella

Filed under
Software

Although its name sounds like that of a bacterium, Coccinella is a nice cross-platform open source Jabber client. While Jabber, and IM clients in general, are a dime a dozen, Coccinella sports a few nifty features that make it worth considering.

Open source databases '60 per cent cheaper'

Filed under
OSS

Open source databases can save enterprises up to 60 per cent over proprietary products, according to data collected by Forrester Research.

Adobe: We may sue over Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

Software maker Adobe may sue Microsoft if it is not satisfied with the European Union's steps to ensure Microsoft's new operating system does not shut out rivals, Adobe's chief executive said.

Google to Sell Newspaper Ads

Filed under
Google

Stop the presses! Google extended its advertising model to that most mobile of media, the newspaper. It sounds crazy, especially in light of the reaction to certain advertising moves the search engine made earlier this year. But this latest maneuver just might be more successful.

Cheat Sheet: Open source licences

Filed under
OSS

Open source licences... much of a muchness? Indeed. Let me start by saying, if you happen to think that all open source software is created equal, you are very, very wrong.

Stable kernel 2.6.18.3 released

Filed under
Linux

The 2.6.18.3 stable kernel update has been released. This update is a bit smaller than its predecessors, but there's still a fair number of fixes here, including at least one which is security-related.

More Here.

Enhance Your Mail Server With ASSP (Anti-Spam SMTP Proxy)

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

ASSP stands for Anti-Spam SMTP Proxy. The ASSP server project is an Open Source platform-independent transparent SMTP proxy server that leverages numerous methodologies and technologies to both rigidly and adaptively identify spam. In short ASSP is the most kickass solution that is both free and works great. It reduced spam to an absolute minimum for me.

http://www.howtoforge.com/antispam_smtp_proxy

Ifconfig - dissected and demystified

Filed under
HowTos

ifconfig - the ubiquitous command bundled with any Unix/Linux OS is used to setup any/all the network interfaces such as ethernet, wireless, modem and so on that are connected to your computer. ifconfig command provides a wealth of knowledge to any person who takes the time to look at its output.

Jokosher 0.2 Released

Filed under
Software

The Jokosher team are proud to announce the second pre-release of their simple yet powerful audio studio for the GNOME desktop. The new 0.2 version of the software has been in active development since July, and has packed Jokosher with the core features to perform full audio recording and production on the Linux desktop.

Printing in OpenOffice.org Calc, Part I: Page styles

Filed under
HowTos

Spreadsheets are primarily used online. For this reason, printing them can be challenging even to experienced users. However, OpenOffice.org offers more help than most spreadsheets with printing, starting with the introduction of page styles. In this entry, I'll explain how Calc page styles can help with printing spreadsheets.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.