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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

PCLinuxOS Magazine September 2007 Issue 13 Released!

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, September 2007 Issue is available to download. Some highlights include PCLinuxOS - A Walk Down History Lane, KDE User Guide - Part 8, and Ubuntu's Hype is Misleading.

KDE 4.0: Well worth the wait!

Filed under
KDE

pinderkent.blogsavy: I was disappointed today to hear that the release of KDE 4.0 will be delayed by two months. The delay is caused by the insertion of two extra betas. But this isn’t a bad thing at all.

Open source a natural for anti-virus software?

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: Consider: a large population of users who can report virii. Many people with the same "itch" (to be free of virii). A subsegment of both communities with the aptitude and interest in killing these virii. Should be a perfect market for open source, right?

Ubuntu Everywhere?

Filed under
Ubuntu

binstock.blogspot: I have long felt that desktop Linux would become a reality only when you could go to a Linux gathering and find no more than a third of the attendees at the command line. Earlier this summer, I was at O'Reilly's Ubuntu Live conference in Portland, and the Ubuntu tribe were almost all using the GUI interface.

Shorties

Filed under
Linux
  • VirtualBox now in Debian

  • Ubuntu and Ruby
  • NOKIA 6300 USB & Ubuntu

Linux: 2.6.23-rc5, Kernel Summit

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Linus Torvalds released the fifth release candidate for the upcoming 2.6.23 Linux kernel noting that he was on his way to Cambridge, England, for the 2007 kernel summit. The invite-only kernel summit has been hosted in Ontario, Canada the past five years, the being the first year it has been hosted in Europe.

Off Topics

Filed under
Misc
  • Tales From The Tech Side (or...would you like valium with your cube?)

  • Diamond goes head to head against Nvidia
  • Isn't It Time We Forked the Concept of a Computer?
  • Thoughts about Captchas: Today animated GIFs, tomorrow Flash videos?

U.S. Backs Open XML as ISO Vote Nears

cio today: In the U.S. vote for Open XML this week, IBM strongly argued against approval of Open XML, and Oracle joined IBM in voting against it. Voting in favor of the Open XML format were Hewlett-Packard, EMC, Intel, Sony Electronics, Lexmark International, and Apple, as well as the Defense Department, Homeland Security, and NIST.

Network Security with tcpwrappers

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu tutorials: I thought today I would outline a few tips on network security with tcpwrappers or, as you’re probably more familiar, the hosts.allow and hosts.deny files. How you can use them?

Writing Scripts that need root permission

Filed under
HowTos

Linux by Example: While executing commands that needs root permission, I rely on sudo. Sudo provides me a very convenient way to execute root privilege commands from my user account provided with my user account password.

Bye bye Dapper. Hello Feisty.

Filed under
Ubuntu

opensourcelearning.info: One wisdom in the realm of Linux says: “If it isn’t broken, don’t fix it”. Well, after a year of playing with Ubuntu Dapper Drake it was time to move ahead. It was getting broken.

Comprehensive Linux Terminal Performance Comparison

Filed under
Software

Martin Ankerl: Linux has an abundance of excellent terminal applications. Interestingly, I could not find any decent comparison of their text display performance. Since I use the command line a lot, I want text output that is as fast as possible.

People Behind KDE: Summer of Code 2007 (3/4)

Filed under
KDE

People Behind KDE releases the third interview in its series of four interviews with students who are working on KDE as part of the Google Summer of Code 2007 - meet Leo Franchi, Juan González Aguilera, Andrew Manson and Marcus Hanwell!

Saving Power on Intel Hardware Using Powertop

only ubuntu: PowerTOP is a Linux tool that finds the software component(s) that make your laptop use more power than necessary while it is idle. However... there are many things that can ruin the party, both inside the kernel and in userspace.

Xubuntu plus Gnome equals … a metapackage

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: I’m going out on a limb saying it, but here’s my brief prediction: Xubuntu’s push toward Gnome applications is going to marginalize the distro.

Nokia N800 As an EBook Reader Using FBReader

Filed under
Hardware

Every Flavour Beans: Though N800 is an Internet Tablet, it can serve as a very good ebook reader too, for those casual/semi-serious readers who don’t want to invest in a stand-alone ebook reader. At its screen size and resolution, reading ebooks is extremely pleasing on the eye.

More ISO OOXML news ahead of today's deadline

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

the inquirer: THERE'S MORE news about countries' ISO votes on Microsoft's proposed OOXML document formats ahead of today's deadline for votes to be submitted.

Also: Poland vote$ for Microsoft OOXML

Conky: highly configurable system monitor for X

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Conky is one of my favorite applications for all of my Linux distros. It is a light-weight system monitor (according to the project page) that can monitor many different aspects of your computer.

Lenovo 3000 N100 Laptop Sound - ALSA work around for Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

typos: I installed Fedora 7 on my new Lenovo 3000 N100 Laptop. It wasn’t big deal getting up wireless on this one with WPA support as well as the graphics. Wow…miracle I thought…! Soon I connected my headset to play some cool music…for my surprise, sound was coming from both the internal speakers and headphones at the same time.

X.Org 7.3 Release Delayed

Filed under
Software

phoronix: If you haven't noticed, the release of X.Org 7.3 has been delayed by at least a week. Eric Anholt, the X.Org 7.3 release manager, had pushed the X.Org 7.3 release back by at least a week due to show-stopping bugs.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming