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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Black Lab Linux Finally Decides on GNOME, App Grid Replaces Ubuntu Software Center Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 7:07pm
Story The GNOME Infrastructure’s FreeIPA move behind the scenes Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 6:56pm
Story Ubuntu's Unity Turns 4, Happy Birthday! Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 6:33pm
Story Release of GNU SRC 2014.10.11 Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 6:27pm
Blog entry How to secure the plex web interface behind a reverse proxy fieldyweb 12/10/2014 - 6:05pm
Story Leftovers: Software Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:33am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:31am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:31am
Story Better know an OS: Linux Mint 17.1 "Qiana" Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:23am
Story Lunar Linux 1.7.0 (i686 & x86_64) ISO’s released Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2014 - 5:03am

ASUS Eee PC is a good option for a lightweight laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vincent Danen: The ASUS Eee PC has become a very popular sub-notebook recently and has undergone quite a few revisions since it was first introduced. Initially it had a smaller screen size and a much smaller drive capacity, but the more recent ASUS Eee PC 900 has rectified many of the perceived shortcomings of previous models.

Linux 2.6.26 Opens Up to Debugging

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: No piece of software is immune to defects, which is why it's important to use tools that help find and fix bugs. That's the idea with the new Linux 2.6.26 kernel, which is providing the Linux ecosystem with an integrated kernel debugger to help improve the open source operating system.

Mozilla insists Firefox 3.1 won't be bum note for developers

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla Corporation has claimed that the transition to Firefox 3.1 won’t be “a major pain-in-the-ass” and pledged developers will not be hit by “surprises along the way”, after royally hacking off users with the 3.0 launch.

Also: Corporations can save millions by supporting Firefox on business websites

Thinking about career in Linux? Part 2

Filed under
Linux
Software

brajeshwar.com: In our previous article - Thinking about career in Linux? Part 1, we saw some of the prerequisites which shall help you build a career in Linux, or the Open Source technology. As promised, we move on from where we took a poise, to discuss some more tools/applications which fall under the same category.

openSuSE stumbles, Ubuntu shines

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I tried loading openSuSE 11.0 on my Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook S2110 over the weekend. It's an AMD Turion 64-based system, and of course it seemed to load just fine. However, for some reason, it stumbled over the Alps touchpad. On the other hand, Ubuntu really shone this afternoon.

Also: Ubuntu Hardy heron on a Sony Vaio VGN-C2S_L

The strength of Linux is in it's flexibility

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: In the material world, it is important for structural components to be strong. They not only have to be strong they also have to be flexible. At the moment I would have to say the strongest operating system is Linux. I say this because out of all the operating systems I know, I believe the most flexible operating system is Linux.

Ubuntu 8.04.1 LTS vs. 8.10 Alpha 2 Performance

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: With Canonical having pulled many new packages into Ubuntu 8.10 from Debian unstable and there being the Linux 2.6.26-rc8 kernel, a near-final version of X.Org 7.4 / Mesa 7.1, and GCC 4.3 among them, we've decided to run a few early benchmarks of Intrepid Ibex.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Understanding Echo, Cat and Add/Append

  • Working with shortcuts in Linux (Ubuntu)
  • Abusing your deb package manager
  • Use Ubuntu Live CD to Backup Files from Your Dead Windows Computer
  • Ten keyboard shortcuts to improve Linux
  • Useful Shortcut Keys In Ubuntu
  • DNS Survivial Guide
  • Atheros AR 5007 EG on openSUSE 11.0
  • Introduction to vi editor in Linux and Unix system

Test drive OpenOffice.org 3.0

Filed under
OOo

tectonic.co.za: OpenOffice.org 3.0, the next major release of the open source office suite, is scheduled to be released in September. Which means that it is pretty much guaranteed to be included in the next release of Ubuntu 8.10, Mandriva 2009 and Fedora 10. Until then it is easy enough to test out the beta. OpenOffice 3.0 has a number of new features.

Finding the Fastest Filesystem

Filed under
Linux

gus3.typepad.com: Part of my "economic stimulus check" went to a 500GB SATA drive. I quickly settled on one goal: find the fastest journaling filesystem (FS) for my SLAMD64 dual-core computer, with 2G of memory. My testing focused on three main areas: filesystem, disk I/O scheduler, and CPU speed.

GNOME 3.0 officially announced... and explained

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: At the recent GNOME User and Developer European Conference (GUADEC), the GNOME release team announced a proposal for developing the next major iteration of the open source desktop environment. The plan offers a long-term strategy for moving GNOME development forward and defining future goals for the desktop.

Desktop Distros

As a long time user of Linux, and reader of Linux Magazines, Websites and Blogs, many see the current Linux situation as being a dawn of a new horizon. Essentially the release of the EEE PC, the timely release of Vista and Ubuntu have all kick started the “Linux Revolution” for the Linux desktop.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 261

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: KDE4: A Fork in the Road, with No Clear Direction?

  • News: Gentoo's False Start, Debian Day 2008, openSUSE Build Service 1.0
  • Released last week: GoblinX 2.7, Absolute Linux 12.1.02
  • Upcoming releases: Granular Linux 1.0, sidux 2008-03
  • Reviewed last week: SliTaz GNU/Linux 1.0, Foresight Linux 2.0.2.1, Puppy Linux 4.00
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Asus blames lack of Linux Eee PCs on Atom hold-ups

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Asus has blamed Intel not Microsoft for the apparent absence of the Atom-based Eee PC 901 from UK suppliers' shelves.

When "Supported" Doesn't Equal "Fully Functional"

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: As your experience in Linux grows, you learn one thing: don’t buy new hardware or peripherals without checking whether it’s supported by your favorite distribution. It saves both money and disappointments. I wanted to buy a decent mediaplayer. One of the players that had both positive reviews and a strong indication of Linux support was the Creative Zen Vision:M.

In Praise of Modularity

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: One of Linus Torvalds' greatest contributions to free software – and, indeed, to software in general – came about purely by chance. As he told me back in 1996, as he reflected on how the Linux kernel had come about and grown:

Untangle gateway continues to impress in open source gateways

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently, I have been evaluating various gateways for Internet facing devices for the small office or home office (SOHO) over the last few weeks. This functionality in this space continues to impress me, and the best part is that a lot of it is available for free.

KDE loses stalwart, Uwe Thiem

Filed under
KDE
Obits

tectonic.co.za: KDE stalwart and African developer Uwe Thiem passed away on Friday afternoon. Uwe was a long-standing developer of KDE and an ardent advocate of free and open source software.

today's howtos & leftovers

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Broadcom Wireless in OpenSUSE 11.0

  • Top Ten Processes Watcher
  • Killing off Ubuntu’s insane update manager
  • Installing Gentoo 2008.0 Live CD
  • Turn off Firefox 3’s “awesome bar”
  • Howto Check For Linux Rootkits
  • MIDI support in OpenSUSE 11.0 w/ Gstreamer
  • Opensolaris and Ubuntu Dual boot
  • Disk Monitoring and reporting Utilities in linux

  • MP3 Tag Editing in Linux
  • Linux in the real world - in the wild
  • DRM File Restructuring For Linux 2.6.27
  • Opinion needed for the KDE menu of mandriva 2009.0
  • Ubuntu vs Mac OS Scorecard
  • Goodbye Kubuntu, Hello OpenSUSE

gOS Space: OSX like operating system without Apple

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: I’ve been a fan of gOS for a while now. I’ve been running their Rocket release for about a year. It’s based on Ubuntu and has the benefit of pre-installed Enlightenment. It’s solid, runs well on lower-end hardware, and…it’s Enlightenment (what more do you want?)

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Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.