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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Choosing your linux

Filed under
Linux

translxp.wordpress: Don’t have much experience on linux? Don’t have much time trying out? Well, if so, you’ll love searching for the right distribution that suits you in minutes with distribution comaparer and distribution choosers.

Chinese Linux hit by credit crunch

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linux has been doing pretty well in China, with recent year-on-year sales going through the roof. However, there can be no escaping the global economic crisis, not even for Chinese Linux.

Can SELINUX impose a better confidentiality over encryption?

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: SE Linux is the Security-Enhanced Linux project started by the NSA which lets you secure Linux at every echelon from the kernel up. SE Linux is in essence a defense against hackers giving users another stratum of protection to online information.

Broswer Wars Reloaded: Javascript speed, Acid tests

I should not show the IE 7 results, because they are embarrassing and Trolls will accuse me of being a zealot. But i can sense that other zealots' blood-lust is building up!! So here are the results:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KDE4Daily 4.2 Edition

  • KDE4 on Gentoo
  • AMD Catalyst 8.12 Linux Driver
  • Google, Mozilla Heat Up Browser Wars
  • Debian on a Dell E4300
  • My Thunderbird extensions
  • Programming GNOME applications with Vala
  • Nexuiz project is looking for developers, modelers, artists, etc
  • Red Hat Takes a Piece of Jaspersoft
  • End-of-Year Thoughts and Resources on Netbooks
  • Tux3 by Christmas?
  • Short Tip: import larger sets of ics files into kontact
  • Installing Condor the easy-easy way
  • Is This the Cloud OS You Wanted?
  • Whither open source in the land of leeches?
  • SELinux on openSUSE 11.1
  • OOo: outline numbering level attribute as part of paragraph style
  • The Impact Mozilla Challenge
  • GUI suite targets embedded Linux distro
  • Slice and Dice Images with ImageMagick
  • Linux Factoids - Your Time To Live Is Gonna Come
  • Quickly create a video presentation of your Linux desktop
  • Ubuntu Server: Suspend/Hibernate for Jaunty?
  • Why DU And DF Display Different Values On Linux
  • A walk down memory lane ... with GNOME and Stormy
  • One step closer...
  • Hardware Review: Yoggie Open Soho Firewall
  • Compiz-Fusion 'n Awn!!!
  • Configuring a chrooted Ubuntu installation
  • YouTube and GNU/Linux: download and convert videos the easy way

I switched to Debian, Fedora, Kubuntu and …

Filed under
Linux

technet.147120.com: Somehow I managed to trash the hard drive in my newly converted Debian box. With a new (to me) 320 GiB drive I just couldn’t resist a multiboot machine.

Unison and Canonical’s Ubuntu Attack Microsoft Exchange

Filed under
Software

thevarguy.com: Unison Technologies, with an assist from Canonical and Ubuntu Linux, says it is “launching a major threat to Microsoft Exchange.” Hmmm. The VAR Guy has heard similar grandstanding before from a range of companies. But Unison has caught our resident blogger’s attention a few times. Here’s why.

Mozilla Security Chief Calls It Quits

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: Window Snyder, the head of security at Mozilla Corp., will resign her position at the end of the year, she said in a blog post Wednesday.

Slackware 12.2 Released

Filed under
Slack

slackware.com: Well folks, it's that time to announce a new stable Slackware release again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.2! Since we've moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware 12.2 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 12.1) and is a must-have upgrade for any Slackware user.

K12Linux founders hand off project to the Fedora community

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Two Oregon educators who founded the K12Linux project seven years ago are glad that they have been able to hand that project over to Fedora, the home they always meant for K12Linux to have.

Will OpenSolaris 2008.11 Attract Linux Users?

Filed under
OS

earthweb.com: This second OpenSolaris release comes with even more software packages than before, more hardware support, and a few nifty features revolving around ZFS. The question we cannot avoid is, “can it replace Linux?”

Beranger Defects to Windows as a rational act

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

beranger.org: This is to certify that I have migrated my home laptops to Windows XP Professional for a week already. In a world with too many irrational religions, who needs another one, called... Linux on the desktop? Red Hat doesn't believe in it, so why should I?

Updating the Free Software Definition

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: Yesterday, we made some changes to the Free Software Definition to help clarify a few points that had been confusing for people in the past. Because this definition is the benchmark we use to decide whether or not a license is free, we want it to be as easy as possible for people to understand.

Five Features Perl 5 Needs Now

Filed under
Software

oreilly.com: Perl's 21st anniversary of release is next Thursday, 18 December. Perl 5 is already 14 years old. Though the language has seen many changes since 1994, it can't stand still. Perl 5.10 added many wonderful features and Perl 6 will change the landscape for programming languages, but what's the vision for Perl 5? How can the language stay relevant?

Why are Child Soldiers & Prostitution in OLPC Videos?!

Filed under
OLPC

olpcnews.com: Joanna Stern at Laptop Mag asks "Has OLPC gone too far" with their latest promotional video, one that starts with child soldiers training to fight and child prostitutes soliciting for sex, before promoting XO's for children:

With HP in, all OEMs now ship desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: I have known for more years than I care to think about that HP has been almost ready to release a pre-configured Linux desktop system. But, then, they wouldn't pull the trigger. Now they have.

Also: Novell, Hewlett-Packard Push SUSE Linux for Schools

First Look: NexentaCore OS

Filed under
OS

rcpmag.com: Recently, I read about NexentaCore, a new experimental operating system that seeks to merge the functionality of a Linux user environment with the OpenSolaris OS kernel, supporting the ZFS file system. I downloaded NexentaCore, currently at version 1.01, and tried it out using VirtualBox.

Amarok 2.0 Rocks the World

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: After two years of intense development, Amarok 2 has become a reality! Some of the highlights that are included in the 2.0 release are a completely redesigned user interface, tight integration with online services such as Magnatune, Jamendo, MP3tunes, Last.fm and Shoutcast.

New Notifications for Jaunty

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.gnome.org: The big innovation (and controversy) coming out of the Desktop Experience team here at UDS seems to be the new notifications work going on.

Review: Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 adds speed and privacy

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Firefox 3.1 may only be a point release -- from 3.0 to 3.1 -- but its just-released Beta 2 version is a good indication that the final release will be a must-have upgrade for anyone using Firefox.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.