Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 24 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Rise of Linux in Embedded Systems Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 5:28pm
Story Qualcomm's Toq smartwatch coming December 2nd for $349.99 Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:36pm
Story Ouya goes white with new limited edition, more expensive microconsole Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:31pm
Story PyPy 2.2 released Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:20pm
Story Top 20 mobile skills in demand Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:15pm
Story Valve—It Really Does Love Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:08pm
Story Ubuntu dev, media slammed over 'security' comment Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 4:05pm
Story Today's Howtos and Software Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 11:15am
Story Devil is in the details of Oracle-to-PostgreSQL migration Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 10:48am
Story Step back, haters: Firefox phone now has ‘thousands of apps’ and global growth Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2013 - 8:48am

NVIDIA 100.14.19 + 8800GTS 640MB

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past Tuesday NVIDIA finally delivered an updated Linux and Solaris display driver (100.14.19). This new software release does, however, contain a number of fixes especially for the GeForce 8 series. We benchmarked a GeForce 8800GTS 640MB with the previous 100.14.11 display driver and then the new 100.14.19 driver release. The performance regression fix is very apparent!

Also: Black Window Bug Fixed?

Why Linux Is Already A Success

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: Anyone who reads InformationWeek regularly probably knows by now that my colleague Alexander Wolfe has more than a few pithy things to say about Linux with his piece 7 Reasons Why Linux Won’t Succeed on the Desktop. After reading it, I thought: Does Linux really need to succeed on the desktop? Maybe the truth is that Linux is already a success.

GNOME 2.20 shows significant improvement

Filed under
Software

linux.com: GNOME 2.20 was released yesterday. Even though I use GNOME regularly, I normally don't get excited over new releases. This time, though, GNOME has a solid list of new features and upgrades. It's worth taking a look at even if you aren't a fan of this desktop environment.

Also: Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: SUSE-Polished GNOME 2.20

What fun things can you do with Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

tuxtoday: So, you are thinking about installing Linux, but you’re a bit worried about getting bored? What about games? Good News! There are a lot of awesome games for Linux.

Divining from the Entrails of Ubuntu's Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

datamation: According to the 2007 DesktopLinux.com survey, Ubuntu is the distribution of choice for 30% of GNU/Linux users. The exact figure is questionable, but Ubuntu's dominance is not. At times, I wondered whether the popularity might be preventing Ubuntu from finishing some rough edges.

KDE and Xorg, Fonts and DPI

Filed under
HowTos

yalb: Today, I’d like to share a tip I found out while working with a beta release for a distribution of Linux with KDE’s 3.5.7 version. So let’s take a look at how you can force KDE to run at the correct DPI for your monitor which will, in turn, make your fonts look MUCH better.

PC-BSD Day 15: PAMP your website

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: One application that always finds its way to my desktop is Apache-MySQL-PHP in one of its incarnations. MAMP for Mac OSX, XAMPP for Windows XP and my portable USB drive and LAMP for my Ubuntu box. In the latter case -and on *BSD- it shouldn’t be necessary to work with an *AMP package. Installing the various component via the software repositories or packages is a matter of entering the proper commands.

My *buntu won't update!

Filed under
Ubuntu

ittoolbox blogs: In terms of updating and upgrading your operating system and all other installed programs Linux (and BSD) would have to be about the best thing since sliced bread. Sometimes for unknown reasons or known reasons the packages fail.

The overestimated Death of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

blog of Gentoo: For the last couple of days I've been reading about the so called Death of the Linux Desktop. What I cannot understand is, how so Linux desktop can be dead if it never existed?

Xen With Graphical User Interface On A Fedora 7 Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up Xen on Fedora 7. Xen enables the paravirtualization of your hardware for its virtual machines if you have a CPU with Vanderpool (Intel) or Pacifica (AMD) technology.

Commercial Software Will Include Open Source, Gartner Says

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: At least 80 percent of all commercial software products will include elements of open-source code by 2010, according to Mark Driver, vice president of research at Gartner. IT organizations will have to manage open-source software along with commercial software.

Forking Linux: Shoot the Messenger?

Filed under
Linux

infoworld blogs: As a professional journalist for over 20 years, I’ve taken my share of below-the-belt hits and personal attacks. After all, when you write about a topic – OS design and implementation – that’s near and dear to so many, you’re bound to bring out the zealots from time to time. However, nothing prepared me for the degree of vitriol hurled my way by the true believers in the Linux community.

Stretch your battery life with Powertop

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic: Getting longer battery life out laptop PCs is the holy grail of mobile computing. Powertop is a Linux tool to eek out those precious minutes of battery life by eliminating unnecessary power wasting processes.

Adding a basket tool to OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: No matter whether you are working on an article, an academic paper, or a novel, research is a crucial part of the writing process. And as with any research, you need a place to save your notes, ideas, relevant links, and text snippets. While there are tools like Basket Note Pads and the Zotero Firefox extension, wouldn't it be nice if you could store and manage your stuff directly from within OpenOffice.org?

Groklaw continues its bad old ways

Filed under
Web

blogbeebe: I'm no friend of Pamela Jones, owner and proprietress of Groklaw. From time to time over the years I've stumbled upon the odd post and thread that, for whatever reason, would disappear over time, expunged by She Who Must Be Obeyed.

Internecine Envy in Linuxland?

Filed under
Linux

networkworld: Reacting to what must be nothing short of unbridled envy at the recent uptick in the fortunes of other Linux distros such as SLED and Ubuntu, M. Spevack is asking why Red RHAT’s version wasn’t chosen instead in surveys taken by the hardware manufacturers Dell and Lenovo.

Linux Browser Review Roundup

Filed under
Software

OSWeekly: Many of you may not realize this if you are new to the Linux world, but there are other browsers out there beside Firefox. It's a powerful browser, yet with it becoming more and more popular, exploits are sure to begin turning up. Today, we will be looking at alternative browsers that are for Linux only.

OLPC machine may cause an education revolution

Filed under
OLPC

computerworld: If the One Laptop Project keeps its promises, the small green US$100 laptop could very well revolutionise teaching in developing nations. Computerworld Denmark asked Jan Soelberg, an expert from the school of education at the University of Aarhus, to try the computer.

Also: Danish school kid's verdict on the OLPC laptop: It's cool!

Linux Community Issues Lead Beginners Back to Windows

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: In the last hour, I have read two completely different articles on Windows users, why they use Windows and how Linux could prevent further piracy. Each piece had its merits, but I still believe that most Linux users simply do not get what Windows users are looking for in an OS.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

More of today's howtos

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.