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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.6.0 released... Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:45am
Story What Does It Mean for Your Computer to Be Loyal? Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:10am
Story LG's webOS 2.0 TVs are coming to CES Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:02am
Story GTK 3.14, Nautilus 3.14 Land In Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet [Quick Update] Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 8:45am
Story Eure-et-Loir department now using Nuxeo document system Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2014 - 11:56pm
Story 2014: The Open Source Tipping Point Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2014 - 11:51pm
Story KDAB contributions to Qt 5.4 Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2014 - 11:42pm
Story Git 2.2.1 Released To Fix Critical Security Issue Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2014 - 11:19pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 Alpha 1 For Its Various Flavors Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2014 - 11:14pm
Story Robolinux 7.7.1 LXDE Runs Windows Apps with Stealth VM Rianne Schestowitz 18/12/2014 - 11:06pm

Gentoo 2008.0 Desktop - Stable now

Filed under
Gentoo

saigonnezumi.com: Due to my busy schedule of the previous week, it actually took me roughly a week to finally get my Gentoo 2008.0 Desktop and configured. This is the first time in over two years that I actually got a fully functional Gentoo system. I even got 3D direct rendering working with nvidia and xorg.

FlameRobin: A GUI to Administer Firebird/Interbase SQL servers

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: FlameRobin is a X-platform GUI application that makes the life of Firebird/Interbase admins easier. It’s a very light-weight solution, but being lightweight doesn’t mean to be poor in features.

Interesting new developments in Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 6

Filed under
Ubuntu

ibeentoubuntu.com: Although I don't use Ubuntu anymore, I still try to keep up with the news on it, and I'v tested the upcoming Intrepid a couple of times recently. There have been some interesting developmetns which I'd like to let you know about.

Also: Test driving the new Ubuntu 8.10

Distributions I’m looking forward to

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: I am looking forward to the upcoming releases of some distributions, some of them old favourites, some of them I’ve never installed before.

Muppy Interview

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

tmxxine.com: Mini-sys is a Puppy Linux fork, designed for stable, commercial use. It includes many enhancements for the home and professional user. 'Muppy' is the code name for Minisys-Linux.∞

Mesa 7.2 Has Been Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Mesa 7.2 has just under a dozen official fixes and it also adds 3D acceleration support for the new lower-end Intel G41 Chipset. The Mesa 7.1 release had support for the original DRI2.

15 Great Quotes from Torvalds and Stallman

Filed under
OSS

junauza.com: In celebration of Software Freedom Day 2008, I would like to share to you all some of my favorite quotes about Free and Open Source Software from no less than the two pillars of FOSS, Linus Torvalds and Richard M. Stallman.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Change Crontab Email Settings ( MAILTO )

  • Ubuntu Rdesktop vulnerability - pretty easy fix
  • Setting up TV tuner card in GNU/Linux
  • Forwarding local mail to Gmail using postfix
  • change grub timeout
  • Minimizing PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME for Speed
  • Spam prevention with Exim and greylistd - Part 2 - management and stats
  • The Ultimate Ubuntu / PulseAudio Guide

Review: Kubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 6

Filed under
Ubuntu

headshotgamer.com: For those that haven't using an Ubuntu (and family) Alternate CD, it's a simplistic way to install the distribution to your PC and allows you to setup some extra niceities like Linux Software RAID as well as speeding up the whole process of installing (off the top of my head, by about a quarter).

How to catch Linux system intruders

Filed under
HowTos

techradar.com: There's no doubt that Linux is a secure operating system. However, nothing is perfect. Millions of lines of code are churned through the kernel every second and it only takes a single programming mistake to open a door into the operating system. If that line of code happens to face the Internet, that's a backdoor to your server.

Software Freedom Day: My Favorite OSS Apps

Filed under
OSS

members.whattheythink: Today is Software Freedom Day worldwide, and I thought I'd support the effort by noting my favorite products. I use computers in Linux and Windows. Many of the programs are also available for Macintosh.

Is open source politically attractive?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Matt Asay thinks it funny that Canada’s Green Party has made open source a part of its election manifesto. Given that it is one of the country’s smaller parties, attracting less than 10 percent of the vote, he questions its utility.

Get thin client benefits for free with openThinClient

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Thin clients reduce hardware costs, offer added security by stripping away storage options, and ease management tasks by storing all configurations on a centralized server. openThinClient is an open source thin client server that is absolutely free.

Eight Monitors With ATI Linux Graphics

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: With the most recent Catalyst 8.9 Linux driver release there is support for MultiView on FireGL and FirePRO graphics cards. This allows the user to use multiple graphics cards together in order to build a single X server that spans all of these displays.

BeOS reborn: 30 days with Haiku

Filed under
OS

techradar.com: Haiku is a free operating system and an alternative to Linux. It celebrated its seventh birthday on 18 August, and it's still being actively developed. Haiku is nowhere near being considered a finished product, but it's now stable enough for everyday use. Most importantly, it's very interesting.

Software Freedom Day is 20 September

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: Transparency is key in enabling people to participate in the creation of wealth and well-being in society. In the past decade, free and open source software (FOSS) has become one of the major catalysts in increasing transparency by lowering the barrier to access the best software technologies. Software Freedom Day (SFD) celebrates this important role of FOSS in making this change happen globally.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Short Tip: htop, a top alternative

  • Video - Installing and Uninstalling Adobe AIR and Applications
  • DPKG and APT-GET commands for packages
  • How to view Routing Table and Change your default Gateway
  • How to make Opera 9.5 look native in KDE 4
  • How to add metadata to digital pictures from the command line
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 1
  • How to Properly Setup Samba

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Testing Day

  • Linux, a more powerful competitor for Vista
  • Mandriva Sync in 2009: what’s new, what’s good, what’s not so good
  • Will VMWare go open source without legal pressure?
  • VMware seeks "a skilled Open Source/Linux expert"
  • Schools get free PC virtualization and Novell SUSE
  • Mandriva announces a new solution for netbooks: Mandriva Mini (PR)
  • Ubuntu-Hardy-Gnome: The Review
  • More On Ubuntu's BulletProofX
  • A very minimal desktop
  • Fleshing out XFCE in Ubuntu
  • 5 Google Reader Extensions for Firefox 3 That Are Worth Using
  • Another step closer to Opera 9.60
  • pimp my mythvideo: another navigation patch
  • Aaron Aseigo: Digging in the Dirt
  • Linux Outlaws 55 - Your Shipment of Feedback Has Arrived
  • The *Other* Vista: Successful and Open Source

UserBase Goes Live!

Filed under
KDE
Web

dot.kde.org: The KDE community is pleased to announce UserBase. UserBase is the new end-user wiki for KDE and complements TechBase, the wiki aimed at developers. It will contain tips and tricks, links to where to get more help, as well as an application catalogue giving an overview of the different kinds of programs that KDE offers.

OpenSUSE 11 - A review of the experience on a ThinkPad T40

Filed under
SUSE

lilserenity.wordpress: Prior to OpenSUSE 11, I was still using Ubuntu 7.10 (and I would have preferred to stay on 7.04 to some respect) with the Gnome desktop environment. I had upgraded OpenOffice.org to 2.3, and Firefox 3.0 by the end.

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Microsoft Linuxwashing and Research Openwashing

today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.