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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Is Windows losing out and Linux gaining?

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The penguin’s come of age. What began as a battle between proprietary and open source Linux software, started by geeks around the world, isn’t plain tech rhetoric anymore. It’s now a mainstream commercial platform — a technology that enterprises are taking very seriously and looking at as a major cost-effective solution that has scalability and a great future roadmap.

Perens set to tackle open-source hardware

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Bruce Perens, an author of the Open Source Definition that codified elements of the collaborative programming philosophy, is set to bring the approach to hardware designs.

Memo to Reuters: stop spreading FUD about Novell and Linux

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The British news agency Reuters came up with a sensational bit of spin on Friday, US time, claiming that the Free Software Foundation could "ban" Novell from selling Linux. Good headline, but very weak on facts. Here's a FAQ that I've written for Jim Finkle, the intrepid Reuters reporter who filed that story:

Music managers for Linux

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Typically I stream all my music online, but after getting the Violent Femmes CD "Viva Wisconsin", I went looking for something to play it with that did better than xmms.

A Week with Gentoo 2006.1 Day 1

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Prior to my Vacation, I asked what folks wanted to see as the next AWW review. Responses were all over the board, but many asked for a review of Gentoo. This is going to be painful, right?

Rants over Fedora Desktop 7 Test 1

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I don't believe in Fedora as a stable, production-grade distro, as it changes radically twice a year (with each release), always bringing something new, but also always breaking something. Relying on Fedora would mean to say, twice a year: "here's a good release; here's a bad release; here's a good release; here's a bad release...".

Ubuntu: 3 Steps to Make it Look Neat

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After you first install Ubuntu and login using your username and passowrd your screen will look like this. Some of us might like this look , some of us might not. You might like it or you might not. If you’re happy with it, than don’t change it !!!

Introduction: Using diff and patch (tutorial)

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The commands diff and patch form a powerful combination. They are widely used to get differences between original files and updated files in such a way that other people who only have the original files can turn them into the updated files with just a single patch file that contains only the differences. This tutorial explains the basics of how to use these great commands.

Drupal: Please help fixing an elusive login issue

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For quite some time now, we have been getting sporadic reports of mysterious login problems, mostly with Internet Explorer but sometimes with other browsers on other OSes.

Help by answering the following:

  1. What specific browser and OS has the problem? (including Major / Minor version)

  2. Does another browser on the same OS have the same problem?

Dual-head nVidia powered displays on openSuse linux: Simple!

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I installed the new version of openSuse without any problems. On first boot it displayed only on one of the screens, giving a dark off-centre shadow on the other screen - oh fudge I thought.

Install and Configure Auth Shadow on Debian/Ubuntu

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This method of installation and configuration works for me, using a combination of apt and building from source. You must have a working apache or apache2 installation and understand the concepts involved with restarting the server, enabling modules and the location and format of configuration files, e.g., httpd.conf or apache2.conf.

boston wrap up

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we discussed default package contents and what settings to look into for customization for fedora 7. looks like f7 stands a good chance of having really nice kde packages thanks both to the fedora community expanding their embrace of the community in general (merging core and extras is a nice move, too) and rex and other kde fans putting in the time and effort.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.20 Released

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commit 62d0cfcb27cf755cebdc93ca95dabc83608007cd
Author: Linus Torvalds
Date: Sun Feb 4 10:44:54 2007 -0800

Vista too taxing but Linux on agenda

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Inland Revenue has eschewed Microsoft Vista and will instead upgrade to Windows XP, while continuing to evaluate the merits of a switch to open source rival Linux.

Year of the Linux desktop? Who cares!

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Remember all those articles around the web that claim "This year might be the year for the Linux desktop" ? Honestly, should we really care? Shouldn't we let the user decide from themselves? Aren't they the final decider in all this?

What is Your Operating System Worth?

If you purchased one of the Microsoft Windows or Apple MacIntosh operating systems, or if it came on the computer it costs somewhere from about $89 (if it's an older Windows 95, 98, or Mac OS) up to a few hundred for the more expensive Windows Vista versions. If you are using Linux what did you pay? Nothing? A dollar or two to get it from a cheap ISO dump? But what is it really worth?

Virtual Users With Postfix, PostfixAdmin, Courier, Mailscanner, ClamAV On CentOS

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This article shows how to set up a Postfix virtual mailserver with Courier-IMAP, Maildrop and the PostfixAdmin web interface. We will secure our mailserver with Mailscanner and ClamAV as anti-virus and SpamAssassin as anti-spam. The setup is based on CentOS 4.4.

DOOM 3 - v1.31 Linux Update Patch Available

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id Software has released a new patch for its FPS DOOM 3. This update brings your retail game to v1.3.1 and adds various fixes and improvements, Vista compatibility, and bringing back cross-platform multiplayer compatibility with the Mac.

Enable and Disable Ubuntu Root Password

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Ubuntu is one of the few Linux distributions out there that will not enable the root account.If you want to do something with root permission on the console you have to type sudo before the command.

SaxenOS 1.1 rc2

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It's been over a year since I tested the origins of SaxenOS, but when rc2 of version 1.1 was announced I thought it was time to see what was new. There have been changes afoot within the SaxenOS project, some major changes. Yet some of the fundamentals remained the same. It was easy to see the roots of Saxen while appreciating the new.

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More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

  • New details revealed about future Samsung QLED TVs
    Samsung has unveiled the latest details of his stunning, next-generation TV. Named SUHD Qualmark Red TV, it’s based on the proprietary technology Samsung has pioneered: QLED, long for Quantum dot Light-Emitting Diode. According to sources from Samsung Electronics, the product will cover the high-end spectrum of the market, proposing itself as the top premium TV produced by the South Korean company. This move, which confirms Samsung’s continuos attention to innovation, proves the drive of the enterprise on delivering the highest quality products with consistency while maintaining a strong focus on research and development.
  • Samsung Z2 Officially Launched in Indonesia
    The Samsung Z2 launch which was initially planned for the month of September in Indonesia, however that didn’t turn out to be true. Samsung Indonesia have finally launched the Z2 in the country at an official launch event. The launch took place at the country’s capital Jakarta on Wednesday that is the 19th of October. The smartphone has been priced at 899,000 Indonesian Rupiah ($70 approx.). Samsung are also bundling a free Batik back cover with the smartphone for the early customers. This is also the first Tizen smartphone to be launched in Indonesia.
  • Game: Candy Funny for your Tizen smartphone
    Here is another puzzle type game that has recently hit the Tizen Store for you to enjoy. “Candy Funny” is brought to you by developer Julio Cesar and is very similar to Candy Crush. You have 300 levels available to play and all levels have 3 stars , the number of stars shows how good or bad you actually are. You don’t have much time to accumulate the highest score you can and unlock further screens.
  • Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016 Game for Tizen Smartphones
    Games2Win India Pvt. Ltd. ( an Indian app development company has more than 800 proprietary apps and games in all smartphone and tablet platforms. Now, they have 51 million downloads of their apps and games in all platforms. They have already got 8 games in the Tizen Store and today they added a new cricket game “Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016”.
  • Slender Man Game Series now available on Tizen Store

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Rivals Red Hat, Mirantis Announce New OpenStack Partnerships
    The cloud rivals both announce new telco alliances as competition in the cloud market heats up. Red Hat and Mirantis both announced large agreements this week that bring their respective OpenStack technologies to carrier partners. The news comes ahead of the OpenStack Summit that kicks off in Barcelona, Spain, on Oct. 24. Red Hat announced on Oct. 19 that it has a new OpenStack partnership with telco provider Ericsson. "Ericsson and Red Hat recognize that we share a common belief in using open source to transform the telecommunications industry, and we are collaborating to bring more open solutions, from OpenStack-based clouds to software-defined networking and infrastructure, to customers," Radhesh Balakrishnan, general manager of OpenStack at Red Hat, told eWEEK.
  • Turbulent Week Ends, How Did This Stock Fare: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Flatpak; the road to CI/CD for desktop applications?
    In this presentation I will introduce Flatpak and how it changes the software distribution model for Linux. In short it will explain the negatives of using packages, how Flatpak solves this, and how to create your own applications and distribute them for use with Flatpak. This presentation was given at the GNOME 3.22 release party, organized by the Beijing GNOME User Group.
  • The who in the where?
    The job is like many other roles called “Community Manager” or “Community Lead.” That means there is a focus on metrics and experiences. One role is to try ensure smooth forward movement of the project towards its goals. Another role is to serve as a source of information and motivation. Another role is as a liaison between the project and significant downstream and sponsoring organizations. In Fedora, this means I help the Fedora Project Leader. I try to be the yen to his yang, the zig to his zag, or the right hand to his right elbow. In all seriousness, it means that I work on a lot of the non-engineering focused areas of the Fedora Project. While Matthew has responsibility for the project as a whole I try to think about users and contributors and be mechanics of keeping the project running smoothly.

Development News

  • Eclipse Foundation Collaboration Yields Open Source Technology for Computational Science
    The gap between the computational science and open source software communities just got smaller – thanks to a collaboration among national laboratories, universities and industry.
  • PyCon India 2016
    “This is awesome!”, this was my first reaction when I boarded my first flight to Delhi. I was having trouble in finding a proper accommodation Kushal, Sayan and Chandan helped me a lot in that part, I finally got honour of bunking with Sayan , Subho and Rtnpro which I will never forget. So, I landed and directly went to JNU convention center. I met the whole Red Hat intern gang . It was fun to meet them all. I had proposed Pagure for Dev Sprint and I pulled in Vivek to do the same. The dev sprint started and there was no sign of Vivek or Saptak, Saptak is FOSSASIA contributor and Vivek contributes to Pagure with me. Finally it was my turn to talk about Pagure on stage , it was beautiful the experience and the energy. We got a lot of young and new contributors and we tried to guide them and make them send at least one PR. One of them was lucky enough to actually make a PR and it got readily merged.
  • Hack This: An Overdue Python Primer
    In writing the most recent Hack This ("Scrape the Web with Beautiful Soup") I again found myself trapped between the competing causes of blog-brevity and making sure everything is totally clear for non-programmers. It's a tough spot! Recapping every little Python (the default language of Hack This) concept is tiring for everyone, but what's the point in the first place if no one can follow what's going on? This post is then intended then as a sort of in-between edition of Hack This, covering a handful of Python features that are going to recur in pretty much every programming tutorial that we do under the Hack This name. A nice thing about Python is that it makes many things much clearer than is possible in almost any other language.
  • Why I won’t be attending Systems We Love
    Here’s one way to put it: to me, Bryan Cantrill is the opposite of another person I admire in operating systems (whom I will leave unnamed). This person makes me feel excited and welcome and safe to talk about and explore operating systems. I’ve never seen them shame or insult or put down anyone. They enthusiastically and openly talk about learning new systems concepts, even when other people think they should already know them. By doing this, they show others that it’s safe to admit that they don’t know something, which is the first step to learning new things. They are helping create the kind of culture I want in systems programming – the kind of culture promoted by Papers We Love, which Bryan cites as the inspiration for Systems We Love. By contrast, when I’m talking to Bryan I feel afraid, cautious, and fearful. Over the years I worked with Bryan, I watched him shame and insult hundreds of people, in public and in private, over email and in person, in papers and talks. Bryan is no Linus Torvalds – Bryan’s insults are usually subtle, insinuating, and beautifully phrased, whereas Linus’ insults tend towards the crude and direct. Even as you are blushing in shame from what Bryan just said about you, you are also admiring his vocabulary, cadence, and command of classical allusion. When I talked to Bryan about any topic, I felt like I was engaging in combat with a much stronger foe who only wanted to win, not help me learn. I always had the nagging fear that I probably wouldn’t even know how cleverly he had insulted me until hours later. I’m sure other people had more positive experiences with Bryan, but my experience matches that of many others. In summary, Bryan is supporting the status quo of the existing culture of systems programming, which is a culture of combat, humiliation, and domination. [...] He gaily recounts the time he gave a highly critical keynote speech at USENIX, bashfully links to a video praising him at a Papers We Love event, elegantly puts down most of the existing operating systems research community, and does it all while using the words “ancillary,” “verve,” and “quadrennial.” Once you know the underlying structure – a layer cake of vituperation and braggadocio, frosted with eloquence – you can see the same pattern in most of his writing and talks.

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