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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 5 Best Free Games For Ubuntu srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 9:35pm
Story 5 key forces driving open source today srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 5:41pm
Story Raspberry Pi doubles the RAM, but resists price hike srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 5:40pm
Story Mandriva Foundation gets a name srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 5:38pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 478 srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 2:02pm
Story Debian Project News - October 15th srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 2:01pm
Story Windows 8 vs Ubuntu: battle of the operating systems srlinuxx 2 15/10/2012 - 1:10pm
Story today's highlights: srlinuxx 15/10/2012 - 1:30am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 14/10/2012 - 4:09pm
Story How To Use Glx-Dock/Cairo-Dock On Ubuntu 12.04 falko 14/10/2012 - 9:20am

Linux: Btrfs, File Data and Metadata Checksums

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Chris Mason announced an early alpha release of his new Btrfs filesystem, "after the last FS summit, I started working on a new filesystem that maintains checksums of all file data and metadata."

Rocket man

Filed under
Ubuntu

Independent.ie: Mark Shuttleworth has his gaze fixed firmly upwards, both towards the heavens and the open source movement. The South African entrepreneur, who is successfully making the Linux operating system commercially viable through Ubuntu, was also the second ever space tourist.

Microsoft Linspire agreement no big deal for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Enterprise Linux News: Sounds like momentum is swinging in Microsoft's favor, right? Not really, said Gordon Haff, senior analyst with Nashua, N.H.-based Illuminata.

Microsoft's true battlefront against Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft

Raiden's Realm: All the recent huss and fuss over Microsoft's patent FUD campaign and their "we will sue you unless you pay us grievous amounts of cash" threatening of Linux is only the tip of the iceberg in a much larger war.

News flash: Microsoft finds that it is god of its own world

Filed under
Microsoft

Matt Asay: I must admit that I am shocked - SHOCKED - that Microsoft found that its software is better than open source software on the desktop for European schools. Shocked, I tell you! I mean, after hours of rigorous study and painfully bought and paid for research, to find out that it likes its own software more than open source.... Who would have thought?

How To Compile A Kernel - Debian Etch

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on a Debian Etch system.

Danger from the Deep - 0.3.0 release

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: Danger from the Deep, an Open Source World War II german uboat simulation, striving for technical and historical accuracy, is now in its 0.3 incarnation. This latest version features a considerable amount of new features as well as tons of bug fixes.

Ubuntu Linux 7.04

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

PC World: Ubuntu Linux has been deemed one of PC World's Best Products of the Year for two years running. Why? It's completely free, it installs easily from one downloadable CD, and it focuses on user-friendliness.

Amarok 2.0 Interview: Jeff Mitchell

Filed under
Interviews

dot.kde.org: In the lead-up to KDE 4, Amarok will be undergoing a number of large changes both under the hood, and cosmetically with the user interface. I managed to interview a developer, Jeff Mitchell, to talk about the things changing in Amarok from the 1.4 stable branch to version 2.0.

Linus Fed Up with FSF

Filed under
OSS

LKML: I'm damn fed up with the FSF being the "protector of freedoms", and also feeling that they can define what those freedoms mean. The GPLv2 is a *legal*license*. And no, the FSF doesn't get to define what the words mean to suit their agenda.

Protect Your Stuff With Encrypted Linux Partitions

Filed under
HowTos

enterprisenetworkingplanet: We see the headlines all the time: "Company X Loses 30,000,000 Customer Social Security Numbers and Other Intimately Personal and Financial Data! Haha, Boy Are Our Faces Red!" How come they never quite know what data is missing, and if it was encrypted or protected in any way?

First look at Fedora Core 7: installer problems abound

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

apcmag: It was with much anticipation that we nabbed the new Fedora Core 7 Live CD in the hope of checking it out first before installing it. Unfortunately, the live CD had other plans.

Is Open Source complacent?

Filed under
OSS

ITtoolbox Blogs: As you probably have heard or read about by now Microsoft has made another deal with another open source company. This time Linspire has signed a deal with Microsoft to license VOIP and Windows proprietary media formats and true type fonts. My question is why?

Getting started with GRUB

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: When you power on your computer, the first software that runs is a bootloader that invokes the computer's operating system. GRUB, the GRand Unified Bootloader, is an integral part of many Linux systems. It starts the Linux kernel. Here's some background on GRUB, and some tips on installing and configuring the software.

Linspire, Microsoft in Linux-related, Patent-Protection deal

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linspire Inc. on June 14 will announce an agreement to license VoIP, Windows Media, and TrueType font technology from Microsoft for use in its Linux distribution. Additionally, the deal includes protection for Linspire customers against possible violations of Microsoft patents by Linux, and other cooperative measures.

Say goodbye to the Internet you knew

Filed under
Web

Rudd-O: Because your kids won’t ever know it. Don’t believe me? Here are the two major turning points, all in one week’s news:

Curbing My Enthusiasm for QuickBooks on Linux

Filed under
Software

eWeek blogs: As my colleague Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols is reporting, Intuit is opting to get a bit cozier with Linux. It's an eye-catching announcement, considering that lukewarm Linux support from Windows-centric application vendors like Intuit remains one of the biggest strikes against the open-source operating system as a mainstream desktop platform.

Mandriva revamps its eTraining website

Filed under
MDV

desktoplinux: Mandriva announced this week that it has revamped its eTraining website interface for better ease of use. In addition, the free online management modules have been improved, and there are two new free courses: one on urpmi and rpmdrake, and the other on Mandriva Flash.

Torvalds-Schwartz Brouhaha

Filed under
OSS
  • Torvalds slams Sun over Linux intentions

  • Open-source Solaris makes GPL 3 more attractive: Linus Torvalds
  • Linus' Take On Sun, OpenSolaris, and GPL v3
  • Schwartz to Torvalds: Dinner at my place?

Yay for yum and yumex!

Filed under
Software

Just Another Tech Blog: I believe my bias against RPM is beginning to leave me, and I am beginning to see that RPM is a very viable package management system. The reason for this sudden support of RPM is yum. Yum is awesome. I could leave it at that... or continue.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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