Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 26 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Zimbra Collaboration Suite (ZCS) Open Source Edition v5.0 On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up the Zimbra Collaboration Suite (ZCS) Open Source Edition v5.0 on Debian Etch. The resulting system provides a full featured collaboration-suite with many features.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Downloading Photos to Ubuntu

  • Billard GL
  • Virtualizing Embedded Linux
  • Finally, E17 has come to the masses
  • Torvalds: Stick to C for kernel coding
  • Torvalds: Contibutors' boss is not my concern
  • two more to freedom
  • Trend Micro patent claim provokes FOSS community, leads to boycott
  • Nice Open Source Fonts
  • Vista a review and comparison with Ubuntu
  • GNOME 2.22 Beta 2 Coming This Week
  • 'Jaws' actor Scheider dies at 75
  • Command Line Equivalents - mpc and bc
  • Tips and tricks: What is the 2038 bug? Is my system affected? How do I fix this issue?
  • Python scripts vs Bash scripts in Linux
  • Make the Linux kernel recognise a SCSI device
  • SCaLE 6X: Interview with KDE's Celeste Lyn Paul
  • SCALE 6x trip report
  • Fetch, Nepomuk, fetch!
  • Sauce The Game Video Review of Open Arena

Thunderbird security woes

Filed under
Moz/FF

desktoplinux.com: When Firefox 2.12 came out on Feb. 7, it brought with it fixes for three critical security holes and seven that were not quite so serious. According to the security advisories, many of these problems were also fixed in the Thunderbird 2.12 e-mail client. Unfortunately, there is no Thunderbird 2.12.

Can we please stop fighting FUD with FUD?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: It has long been the case that proprietary software companies, particularly Microsoft, regularly engage in FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) tactics against their opponents. Recently I’ve noticed a surge in the amount of FUD going the other way—from the FOSS community towards Microsoft and other proprietary software companies. Why do we feel it is necessary to fight FUD with FUD?

The PHP Community Starts the PHP 4 Sunset, Gears Up for PHP 6

Filed under
Software
Interviews

itjungle.com: The community behind the PHP scripting language that controls much of the Web application infrastructure out there on the Internet and on corporate networks has been evolving for a number of years. Andi Gutmans, one of the founders of Zend and its chief technology officer, explained that is going on in the PHP community in a recent interview.

Eight Distros a Week: Debian 4.0

Filed under
Linux

larrythefreesoftwareguy: Talking about this particular review with a trusted friend who far out-geeks me (but I’m working on it), he made the following comparison. “Isn’t reviewing Debian kind of like reviewing your mother?”

Also: Eight Distros a Week: AntiX ‘Spartacus’ / ‘Lysistrata’
And: Eight Distros a Week: Fedora 7 / Fedora 8

GNOME Annoys Users by Mangling Linux Copy & Paste

Filed under
Software

linuxtnt.wordpress: One annoying misfeature of Gnome is the way that they have tried to foul up X Windows cut and paste. For some reason Gnome added another cut and paste feature which copies the clunky one on Microsoft Windows.

New Opera snapshot: Introducing advanced tab activation

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com blog: This build implements a much requested option for all you users switching from other browsers. You can now get that Safari, Firefox, IE or <insert alternative browser of choice here> tab handling in Opera, too.

How to: partition hard drive for Linux

Filed under
HowTos

tech.blorge.com: Linux has a complicated hierarchy of files and folders that can be confusing right from the start when a user is trying to migrate to Linux. When asked for partition information by the installer, a user may feel uncomfortable continuing. We’ll try to sort through some of that mess here.

QEMU: A Review

Filed under
Software

linuxhow2.com: What is QEMU? It's a free software "processor emulator", which means it's capable of running applications written for other systems natively on your current operating system. The QEMU virtual CPU core library is released underneath the GNU LGPL. QEMU is capable of running a guest operating system on top of your current operating system, in the same manner as applications such as VirtualBox OSE and Vmware Workstation.

Everex Zonbu Notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcmag.com: The Zonbu PC, a $99 miniature desktop that debuted earlier this year, generated some excitement among those with shallow pockets—at least until they saw the fine print.

Also: Mini-laptop sweeps through schools
And: Sri Lanka to introduce one laptop per child

F-Spot

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Nowadays, people have a lot of media. Music, videos and photos. One application for Linux for managing a library of photos is F-Spot. I thought I would take it for a spin, under Fedora 8 and GNOME.

Expect OpenXML win for Microsoft at ISO

Filed under
Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: It’s the nature of the system, admits Andy Updegrove, legal advisor to the Linux Foundation. The format of Microsoft Office will likely become an official International Standards Organization standard at the end of this month.

Last Prosecution Witness to Take Stand in Hans Reiser Murder Trial

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The Hans Reiser murder trial reaches a milestone Monday, when the prosecution is expected to put on its last witness -- three months after jurors began hearing some 50 witnesses here in Alameda County Superior Court.

Also: Nina Reiser's Mom Sobbing on Witness Stand

today's howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Index and search with KDE's new Strigi

  • Media and ubuntu
  • A nice little Calc spreadsheet function
  • SSHMenu - SSH connection manager
  • Faxing in OpenOffice.org
  • Command-Not-Found on Slackware
  • Installing IE in Linux
  • Mplayer Skins Ubuntu->How To
  • Linux Tip: Setting your resolver

A deep look to Firefox 3 Beta 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: Later today, Mozilla will release Firefox 3 Beta 3, the eleventh milestone in the longest development time for a Firefox revision since the initial Firefox 1.0 on 2004. The eight alphas and trio of betas (so far), if anything, are a reflection of the long list of enhancements it (Firefox) and the underlying Gecko rendering engine, are bringing along.

PCLinuxOS Gnome 2008 - Linstized screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: I was looking for PCLinuxOS flavours with latest xorg and kernel. PCLinuxOS official version is yet to be released. So I thought why not try its gnome remaster. It's the same pclinuxos with gnome desktop. And here is the result of what I got.

Ubuntu Linux - 10 Programs You Need to Download (as .DEB)

Filed under
Software

blogs.ifcode.com: Well, I thought I’d create my own list of programs I FEEL I couldn’t live without, and don’t come installed as default. Here goes:

Compiz-Fusion Community News for February 9, 2008

Filed under
Software

In the time between the previous community news and the last, there have been a number of new and interesting cool features added to Compiz-Fusion. The changes have taken place due to our community and our very own onestone who has added a slew of KDE 4 composite features to Compiz.

Why YAST is too VAST

Filed under
Software

Raiden's Realm: be·he·moth (b-hmth, b-mth) n. 1. Something enormous in size or power. 2. A huge animal.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations