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Saturday, 25 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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openSUSE 11.0 beta

Filed under
SUSE

duncan.mac-vicar.com: While reading Review: Hat Trick For Fedora 9 Beta, it caught my attention that the author says “Fedora continues to wear the innovation hat” because some of the changes described there. I did not see any killer feature openSUSE 11.0 does not have too, and a few ones are worth to highlight:

NixOS: A Purely Functional Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

people.cs.uu.nl: Existing package and system configuration management tools suffer from an imperative model, where system administration actions such as upgrading packages or changes to system configuration files are stateful: they destructively update the state of the system. This leads to many problems. In this paper we show that we can overcome these problems.

Linux Is No Longer The Cool New Kid On The Block. So Now What?

Filed under
Linux

Charles Babcock: Linux usage has grown fast over the past several years as the operating system moved from perimeter Web servers to workloads much closer to the heart of the business, while gaining a broad following of contributors and commercial users. But the days of these easy advances may be past.

Editorial: Open source is not about love

Filed under
OSS

beranger.org: As some open source developers seem to be unable to accept a mere reporting of a bug, this got me a reason for a long summary. I'll have to start by invoking the Evil before trying to prove that nowadays there is a severe lack of direction in whatever concerns the open-source desktop.

Red Hat`s Challenge

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Five years ago, Red Hat sent a shock wave through the Linux community when it announced a new bleeding-edge development pace for its flagship distribution, Red Hat Linux. Fast-forward to today: Red Hat remains focused most keenly on the enterprise server stack. The lack of an identity and management solution for Linux is retarding Linux's growth.

Switching from Windows to GNU/Linux (a newbie's guide) Part Two

Filed under
Linux

ladyofthecastle.blogspot: In the last post..I tried to make the argument for why GNU/Linux is wonderful and how everyone should make the switch. In this post, I will be reviewing the distributions (distros, or "flavors") of GNU/Linux that I personally have downloaded and tried out, which ones I liked or didn't and why.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux 2.6.25-rc9, "I Really Don't Want To Do This"

  • KDE Commit-Digest for 30th March 2008
  • Gartner groks CATB; Endere next?
  • Where are the Mac to Linux ports?
  • Microsoft’s credibility turning to junk while Linux revenue grows
  • AGPL v3 to be added to Palamida Watch List
  • KDE 4 Plus and Minus
  • X Window compression software updated
  • Linux Is Dead, Long Live Linux
  • Linux's death -- greatly exaggerated?
  • GSL Quick and Dirty Numerics

Extreme Linux Installing... well kind of

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I went over to the Isle of Man for a friends wedding and took my Dell m1330n laptop with me which runs Ubuntu Gutsy. I used it a lot while I was there and it was running well but I wanted to reinstall the OS.

Mandriva Linux 2008.1 - The Blooming Spring

linuxseekers.com: Mandriva Linux is a predominantly KDE-centric Linux distribution originating from France. I decided to review Mandriva 2008 Spring (aka Mandriva Linux 2008.1) when I got to know that, this new Spring edition has a full support for the Asus Eee PC and also improved support for mobile device synchronization.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • User Access Control in Drupal 6

  • Howto: Vectorize images in Inkscape
  • Automating FTP I: UNIX and Linux
  • Install OpenSuse Tutorial in Video
  • Howto: Install awesome Music Visualizations for Rythmbox and XMMS In Ubuntu
  • Get 3D Effects running in PCLinuxOS
  • Quickzi: How To List Files with a Certain Date Stamp

A quick look at Kubuntu 8.04 Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

downloadsquad.com: Recently, we reviewed Ubuntu 8.04 beta. We received several complaints for cranky people in the comments, and so we decided to take a look at some newer code. We decided to spice things up a little bit by trying Kubuntu instead of Ubuntu.

There's no way Ballmer survives Yahoo! disaster scenario

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: Microsoft is buying Yahoo! to . . . oh, that's right no one from Redmond has really explained that one yet. Most of the pundits think Redmond has an ad play in mind. Well, the Open Season crew sees it differently. In Episode 15, Matt Asay, Dave Rosenberg and I dig into the real motives behind Microsoft's lust for Yahoo!

Truth is Treason in the Empire of Lies: The Truth about Linspire

Filed under
Linux

kevincarmony.blogspot: After failing to get any response from Linspire as to why they are not holding annual shareholder meetings, I asked them publicly to do so in my last blog. Not only has Linspire not held a shareholders meeting, but to this day, they have not even responded to my inquiries with so much as a "we'll get back to you on that."

Virtualization Makes Running Linux a Snap

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: Many people love Linux but aren't able to commit to using it full time. Some folks use certain peripherals that Linux can't yet accommodate, while others need applications for which suitable open source options don't yet exist. Fortunately, virtualization makes it possible to put your favorite Linux distribution right on your Mac or Windows PC.

Commentary: the Linux Foundation and the future of Linux

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: I came away from the second annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit with mixed feelings. I mean, it's hard not to support the group that pays Linus Torvalds to spend his time continuing to lead the poster-boy project for free and open source software. But at the same time, those golden chains are my biggest concern about the Linux Foundation.

Analysts Get Hit By Cluestick?

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: It might not be entirely evident from the headlines, but if you read the articles, it will become immediately clear: these positive statements about Linux and negative statements about Windows are courtesy of analysts.

Review: Hat Trick For Fedora 9 Beta

Filed under
Linux

crn.com: Fedora announced Fedora 9 Beta late last month, and Test Center reviewers replaced the current Fedora 8 install to see what the new version has to offer. There is a solid indication of the new things to come that makes the stable release, expected May 1, worth watching.

Mandriva Flash 2008 USB Key Review

Filed under
MDV

reviewlinux.com: USB Key Linux distributions seem to be the craze at the moment. The Mandriva Flash 2008 4 gig USB Key is bundled on a Dane-Elec USB Key. It's sturdy construction and proven reliability makes Dane-Elec a good chioce for Mandriva to place their OS on.

The Linux lesson Windows needs

Filed under
OS

Dana Blankenhorn: Gartner analysts are running about in Las Vegas, hair on fire, shouting that Windows is collapsing. Or about to collapse. This is easy to get snarky about, but for Linux’ sake I hope it never happens.

Also: Linux or open source?

Interview: How a hacker became a freedom fighter

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

newscientist.com: One of the founding fathers of "free software" and an esteemed elder of the hacking community, Richard Stallman has made defending people's freedoms his life's work. His advocacy of personal freedoms extends to the protection of true democracy and of the human rights increasingly being trampled on in the US and elsewhere.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.