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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Qseven i.MX6 COM adds industrial temperature range Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 7:25am
Story Calculate Linux 14.12 released Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 7:22am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 12:47am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 12:46am
Story Looking Ahead: Rebuilding PaaS in a Containerized World Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 12:13am
Story Open-Source Godot 1.0 Engine Released & Declared Stable Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 12:03am
Story Why is the Number of Linux Distros Declining? Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 11:42pm
Story Pay For Faster Linux Kernel Performance? There's Patches For That Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 11:34pm
Story BLD Kernel Scheduler Updated For Linux 3.19 Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 11:31pm
Story Linux Malware vs Phishing Schemes Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 11:28pm

Canonical CTO bites back at Linux Plumbers Conference keynote

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Matt Zimmerman, CTO of Canonical, is unhappy with Greg Kroah-Hartman, one of the Linux kernel maintainers, because of Kroah-Hartman's keynote at the Linux Plumbers Conference. The keynote, described elsewhere as a reworking a June presentation, makes a number of claims about Canonical's activity in the community, presenting various tables which showed Canonical not making many upstream patches and concluding "Canonical doesn't give back to the community".

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Doesn't Need Slick Marketing

  • From Ghana to Wall Street: The Linux End User Summit
  • I want a real Linux and Mac version of Chrome
  • Portrait: LinuxToday managing editor Carla Schroder
  • Reports: Microsoft to End Effort With Seinfeld and Gates
  • Bob Dylan using Drupal
  • Open-Source Alternatives To Microsoft Office, Part II
  • Upstart Seeks To Overthrow OpenOffice
  • High-end developers choose commercial Linux
  • Yahoo! Zimbra Desktop - all in one desktop application for openSUSE
  • 160 hours left to register for the openSUSE board election
  • The Open Source Home Business Model - Beyond Installfests
  • Lenovo’s New Servers: Novell Beats Red Hat to the Punch
  • X11 Connection Rejected Because of Wrong Authentication Error
  • The $75, one watt laptop
  • Linux and the Enterprise Desktop, Revisited
  • 3-D virtual reality environment developed at UC San Diego helps scientists innovate

Rhythmbox, Gnome music awesomeness

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Amarok sure inspires a lot of KDE-envy for Gnome users. Unfortunately, it doesn’t fit in well in Gnome: it’s written for a different desktop environment, uses a whole different toolkit, and requires a lot of extra libraries to run. Luckily, there’s a great Gnome-based alternative: Rhythmbox.

Wolfie get’s his Glorious Day

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mock-Ups Available for Notices (previously was EULA)

  • Wolfie get’s his Glorious Day
  • Mozilla to remove Firefox EULA
  • Ubuntu browsers Javascript benchmark

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Adobe AIR in Ubuntu

  • Tune TCP/IP setting using sysctl
  • How to use Magic System Request Keys in Ubuntu Linux
  • Lazy umount
  • Create Random Blank Files
  • MySql basics CentOs 5
  • Implement load-balancing, port forwarding, and rate-limiting with shd-tcp-tools
  • HOWTO : Ubuntu eee on ASUS Eee PC 701
  • Streamlined Perl Number Matching Script For Unix Or Linux

Happy Birthday Linux

Filed under
Linux

Sun sends out global call for open source support

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: Networking giant Sun has called on its employees and community members to promote the importance and benefits of open source technologies. Sun has made the call as part of its sponsorship of Software Freedom Day (SFD) on September 20, 2008.

Greg Kroah-Hartman’s Linux Ecosystem

Filed under
Linux

mdzlog.wordpress: As the opening keynote at the Linux Plumbers Conference, Greg Kroah-Hartman delivered a talk entitled “The Linux Ecosystem, where do you fit in it?“ There were, let’s say, a few elements of it which I found objectionable. The central issue, of course, was that he devoted a large portion of the talk to showing that Canonical contributes fewer patches to the Linux kernel than many other companies.

Are Open Source Violations Lurking in Your Code?

Filed under
OSS

pcworld.com: IT organizations that feel safe from open source licensing violations might be wise to check their code, as open source components are rapidly seeping into applications by way of offshore and in-house developers taking open source shortcuts, as well as a growing population of open source-savvy grads entering the workforce.

Richard Stallman talks

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

guiodic.wordpress: I interviewed RMS on GNU 25th anniversary, Google Chrome, non-free software sharing, GNU/Linux on netbooks and free-as-in-freedom drivers.

Novell Chief Uses Linux Desktop

Filed under
SUSE

informationweek.com: Novell CEO Ronald Hovsepian said Wednesday that he uses a Linux-based desktop while on the job and that Novell's use of open source software internally "has saved the company a lot of money." Hovsepian made the comments as he delivered a keynote presentation at the Interop technology conference and exhibition in New York.

10 things Linux does better than Windows

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you tallied up the strengths and weaknesses of Linux and Windows, which OS would come out ahead? According to Jack Wallen, superiority in security, flexibility, interoperability, community, and command-line power (among other things) put Linux well ahead. See if you agree with his assessment.

Myths of Linux - People don't care about licensing

Filed under
OSS

gnuru.org: I care about the licensing of the software I use, not because of some philosophical principle, but because I got sick and tired of having the thumbscrews put on me by proprietary software companies.

Cortex-A8 gaming handheld runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: OpenPandora.org will start taking orders this month for its developer-friendly Linux-based handheld gaming device. Set to ship in November, the $330 device runs Angstrom Linux on an ARM Cortex-A8 processor with OpenGL 2.0 graphics and a 4.3-inch, 800x480 touchscreen.

5 Great iTunes Replacements for Managing iPod in Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: We all love the iPod, but sadly, Apple is still not kind enough to provide an iPod manager for those of us who use Linux. However, this is not really a big issue nowadays as there are other means to manage your iPod under Linux. Thanks to these excellent free and open source media players that are certified to handle your iPod the way iTunes can.

Tracking Linux CPU Performance Statistics

computingtech.blogspot: Each system-wide Linux performance tool provides different ways to extract similar statistics. Although no tool displays all the statistics, some of the tools display the same statistics.

Fedora 10's Plymouth Might Prevent Boot

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: There’s a new feature coming in Fedora 10 that is going to be very apparent to users trying the F10 Beta as their first introduction to the release. Plymouth uses X modesetting to drop the aging rhgb graphical boot engine in favor of a sleeker, faster system. However, the feature doesn’t work seamlessly for every video chipset.

The First Three Netbooks To Consider

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Wading through the numerous netbooks available today can be challenging, so you might want to at least start with this list of the first three netbooks to consider.

Review: KLibido Newsreader 0.2.5

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: One of the things I've been forever in search of on Linux is a good newsreader, especially for binaries, since I frequently find that the various files I'm after (patches and distro ISO files mostly) are available only on Usenet.

Linux Promotion in Mall Kiosks

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb: I have been attending Linux install festivals for years. Always fun, often educational and (in some cases) completely missing the mark of their potential for the people they interact with. There is so much more these same knowledgeable individuals could be doing with the general public.

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Openwashing Apple and Microsoft Proprietary Frameworks/Services

Viperr Linux Keeps Crunchbang Alive with a Fedora Flair

Do you remember Crunchbang Linux? Crunchbang (often referred to as #!) was a fan-favorite, Debian-based distribution that focused on using a bare minimum of resources. This was accomplished by discarding the standard desktop environment and using a modified version of the Openbox Window Manager. For some, Crunchbang was a lightweight Linux dream come true. It was lightning fast, easy to use, and hearkened back to the Linux of old. Read more

Openwashing Cars

  • Open source: sharing patents to speed up innovation
    Adjusting to climate change will require a lot of good ideas. The need to develop more sustainable forms of industry in the decades ahead demands vision and ingenuity. Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla and SpaceX, believes he has found a way for companies to share their breakthroughs and speed up innovation. Fond of a bold gesture, the carmaker and space privateer announced back in 2014 that Tesla would make its patents on electric vehicle technology freely available, dropping the threat of lawsuits over its intellectual property (IP). Mr Musk argued the removal of pesky legal barriers would help “accelerate the advent of sustainable transport”. The stunning move has already had an impact. Toyota has followed Tesla by sharing more than 5,600 patents related to hydrogen fuel cell cars, making them available royalty free. Ford has also decided to allow competitors to use its own electric vehicle-related patents, provided they are willing to pay for licences. Could Telsa’s audacious strategy signal a more open approach to patents among leading innovators? And if more major companies should decide to adopt a carefree attitude to IP, what are the risks involved?
  • Autonomous car platform Apollo doesn't want you to reinvent the wheel
    Open source technologies are solving many of our most pressing problems, in part because the open source model of cooperation, collaboration, and almost endless iteration creates an environment where problems are more readily solved. As the adage goes, "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow." However, self-driving vehicle technology is one rapidly growing area that hasn't been greatly influenced by open source. Most of today's autonomous vehicles, including those from Volkswagen, BMW, Volvo, Uber, and Google, ride on proprietary technology, as companies seek to be the first to deliver a successful solution. That changed recently with the launch of Baidu's Apollo.

today's leftovers

  • KDE Applications 18.04 Brings Dolphin Improvements, JuK Wayland Support
    The KDE community has announced the release today of KDE Applications 18.04 as the first major update to the open-source KDE application set for 2018.
  • Plasma Startup
    Startup is one of the rougher aspects of the Plasma experience and therefore something we’ve put some time into fixing [...] The most important part of any speed work is correctly analysing it. systemd-bootchart is nearly perfect for this job, but it’s filled with a lot of system noise.
  • Announcing Virtlyst – a web interface to manage virtual machines
    Virtlyst is a web tool that allows you to manage virtual machines. In essence it’s a clone of webvirtmgr, but using Cutelyst as the backend, the reasoning behind this was that my father in law needs a server for his ASP app on a Win2k server, the server has only 4 GiB of RAM and after a week running webvirtmgr it was eating 300 MiB close to 10% of all available RAM. To get a VNC or SPICE tunnel it spawns websockify which on each new instance around 20 MiB of RAM get’s used. I found this unacceptable, a tool that is only going to be used once in a while, like if the win2k freezes or goes BSOD, CPU usage while higher didn’t play a role on this.
  • OPNFV: driving the network towards open source "Tip to Top"
    Heather provides an update on the current status of OPNFV. How is its work continuing and how is it pursuing the overall mission? Heather says much of its work is really ‘devops’ and it's working on a continuous integration basis with the other open source bodies. That work continues as more bodies join forces with the Linux Foundation. Most recently OPNFV has signed a partnership agreement with the open compute project. Heather says the overall OPNFV objective is to work towards open source ‘Tip to top’ and all built by the community in ‘open source’. “When we started, OPNFV was very VM oriented (virtual machine), but now the open source movement is looking more to cloud native and containerisation as the way forward,” she says. The body has also launched a C-RAN project to ensure that NFV will be ready to underpin 5G networks as they emerge.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E07 – Seven Years in Tibet - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Failure to automate: 3 ways it costs you
    When I ask IT leaders what they see as the biggest benefit to automation, “savings” is often the first word out of their mouths. They’re under pressure to make their departments run as efficiently as possible and see automation as a way to help them do so. Cost savings are certainly a benefit of automation, but I’d argue that IT leaders who pursue automation for cost-savings alone are missing the bigger picture of how it can help their businesses. The true value of automation doesn’t lie in bringing down expenses, but rather in enabling IT teams to scale their businesses.
  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes
    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition. Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration. "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."