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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Paging Michael Dell: Where’s My Order?

Filed under
Ubuntu

allaboutubuntu: I ordered my Dell PC with Ubuntu Linux on May 27. Dell.com informed me that the system would ship somewhere around June 12. Quite a long wait, but I was willing to sit tight. Now, the problem:

Interesting Interviews:

  • Interview with Brian Aker

  • Interview with Havoc Pennington

Feed your content cravings with Liferea

linux.com: find myself not browsing the Web as much as I used to, thanks to Liferea, a Linux-based aggregator for online news feeds. A news aggregator eliminates the need for surfing the Web as much. Instead of going to all the Web pages you have bookmarked to read your favorite blogs, news, or media presentations, you can simply add an RSS/RDF or Atom syndication format to Liferea and have all the news feeds at your command.

Open source: New target of malware?

Filed under
Security

ZDNet: The recent OpenOffice worm may be a sign that malware writers are starting to target the increasingly popular open-source software, industry experts say.

Gnash, the open source Flash project, releases support for YouTube

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: I missed that the Gnash team had started a blog, but in going through my feeds I discovered it and found out that they’ve recently added support for viewing YouTube videos. Gnash is an open source project that aims to provide the functionality of the Flash Player.

Safari on Linux

Filed under
Software

pimp your linux: Monday at the WWDC Steve Jobs announced that Safari would be ported to Windows. Many people in the audience found this more shocking than the new features offered in the leopard operating system. The reasons behind the port still remain unclear. Does Safari work for Linux?

Intuit's QuickBooks Enterprise Solutions Embraces Linux

Filed under
Software

LWN: The press release is thin on technical details and there is no mention of client-side Linux support, but Intuit is, perhaps for the first time, actually admitting that Linux shops exist. It appears they are offering a way to store the database for their mid-range QuickBooks on Linux servers.

Setting up a Freebsd Multimedia Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

Raiden's Realm: Of all the many wonderful and free operating systems out there, few can begin to meet or surpass the quality, stability, and structured operation of FreeBSD. That’s why I like it so much and have used it for years. But out of the box, FreeBSD is and always will be a server OS. In this tutorial I plan to show you how to set up your own Freebsd desktop from scratch.

Wizpy music player disappoints

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: Turbolinux's Linux-based wizpy music player is a beautiful device. It's slick, black, and slightly smaller than the smallest cell phones. Unfortunately, its value and functionality doesn't live up to its good looks.

VNC over SSH : securing the remote desktop

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu tutorials: As you may have noticed most network protocols do not have much for built in security. Many rely on other programs for their network security needs, such as ssh. This is also the case with VNC.

Bringing free software down to earth

Filed under
Ubuntu

economist.com: Mark Shuttleworth, software entrepreneur and space tourist, believes that open-source software is not just for geeks. AS HE lays out his vision for the future of open-source software, Mark Shuttleworth is enthusiastic, but he looks tired. He has been up late negotiating yet another deal as part of his mission to bring open source to a wider audience.

Desktop publishing with OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: "Do you offer a program like Microsoft Publisher?" Some version of this question appears regularly on the OpenOffice.org mailing lists. Many people automatic answer "no," and say that Scribus is more suitable for desktop publishing. But, in fact, OpenOffice.org boasts two mid-level layout programs -- Draw and Writer -- each of which is far more versatile than its name suggests.

Consequences of Closed Source Software in Linux

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: With the news of Linspire's CNR coming soon to Ubuntu, and Automatix now offering a limited number of closed source, commercial applications, what possible consequences will this have on the Linux community and open source as a whole?

Why everybody should use GNU/Linux, and how?

Filed under
Linux

FreeSoftware Mag: GNU/Linux is getting bigger and bigger. Microsoft’s recent patent threats are definitely helping GNU/Linux to gain mainstream popularity. Unfortunately, new users are often confused by why they should actually use GNU/Linux, and how to go about the transition. Hopefully, this article will fill that gap!

Tip of the Trade: Edubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

serverwatch: When you need to set up a computer lab, classroom or meeting room in a hurry, look no further than Edubuntu, "Linux for Young Human Beings." Edubuntu is targeted at the classroom, but it's a dandy Linux terminal server for all occasions. You can literally have an entire network up and and running in an hour.

OpenOffice.org 2.2.1 released

Filed under
OOo

The OpenOffice.org Community announces the availability of OpenOffice.org Release 2.2.1. This is a minor bug fix release. As this release also fixes security vulnerabilities we recommend all users should upgrade.

We all use rose colored glasses

Filed under
Linux

itToolbox blogs: A reader of my articles has posted some very insightful comments in regards to operating system aficionados developing tunnel vision. I would like to expand on that. Not only do we develop tunnel vision we further compromise our vision by wearing rose colored glasses.

Mr. Wizard Dies at 89

Filed under
Obits

Washington Post: Don Herbert, 89, who as television's Mr. Wizard was for many years one of the nation's foremost popularizers of science, particularly noted for his ability to attract, inspire and hold the interest of children, died June 11 at his home in the Los Angeles area.

mmv: Mass moving and renaming files

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Mmv is command-line tool which allows the user to move, rename, copy, append and link large amounts of files with a single command. The tool is especially useful when you need to rename a lot of files that have similar filenames, yet subtle differences.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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