Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Even Linus Torvalds Needs to be Civil srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 11:16pm
Story Join the Most Technical Mardi Gras Parade In History srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:29pm
Story Raspberry Pi Camera Module Review – Eye Pi srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:27pm
Story Aggregate System Menu arrives for Shell 3.10 srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:24pm
Story Tips To Make Ubuntu Look Cool srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:35pm
Story Features Approved This Week For Fedora 20 srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:33pm
Story The H is closing down srlinuxx 2 19/07/2013 - 5:30pm
Story ROSA Desktop R1 GNOME preview srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:27pm
Story A Planetary Nebula That Looks Like the Firefox Logo srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 3:57pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 9:19am

Migrating from Windows to Linux: the gentle guide

Filed under
OS

iTWire: Linux has long been held in mystique as an operating system for hard-core techies or hackers. Yet, this is far from true for today’s distros. A modern version of Linux is as easy to setup and use as the Macintosh is legendary for. Here’s reasons why people stick to Windows and how those factors can be solved in what we like to call a ‘gentle’ approach to Linux.

Introduction to Firestarter

Filed under
Software

freesoftware mag: Most modern GNU/Linux distributions are secure with their default minimal installs, whether desktop or server, while some distributions are designed specifically with security in mind. However, any GNU/Linux distribution that needs services available to other users or systems will need either enhanced or configurable security.

Move over, wget! Mirroring sites with httrack

Filed under
Software

tipotheday.com: Wget is great; I use it all the time for simple and *ahem* "bulk" downloads. But when you're after the spirit of a web page, httrack seems to do a much more thorough job. Turning a site from dynamic content has never been easier.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Sneak Peak: Firefox 3

  • Adobe Flash Player 9 Update 3 Beta 2 available for Linux
  • The Etherboot/gPXE BoF from LinuxWorld 2007 (videos)
  • Acer launches new “Value Segment” notebooks
  • Managing Linux with Active Directory the Centrify way
  • How much do open source license terms matter?
  • OOXML: Brazil Says NO
  • The 10 most useful applications in Ubuntu
  • Mozilla scheduled to launch Firefox Campus Edition

More time needed for Palm's Foleo

Filed under
Hardware

c|net: Barron's Tech Trader Daily blog spotted a research note from Deutsche Bank's Jonathan Goldberg saying that Palm has delayed the launch of the Foleo, a Linux-based "mobile companion" that looks like a laptop.

Microsoft kills its ‘Get the Facts’ anti-Linux site

Filed under
Linux

Mary Jo Foley: It was a long time in coming. But Microsoft has finally acknowledged that its anti-Linux site had gone past the point of usefulness. On August 23, Microsoft pulled plug on the “Get the Facts” site, replacing it with a new Windows Server “Compare” site.

Open source companies to watch

Filed under
OSS

LinuxWorld: Open source is making its way into more and more enterprises with cheap, robust alternatives to solutions offered by proprietary software vendors. Read this article to learn about eight open source companies worth watching.

Also: What’s become of last year’s open source companies to watch?

The 40 coolest free applications around

Filed under
Software

seopher: Everyone loves free software (open source or otherwise) and this list demonstrates quite how many excellent applications can be had for free. If you thought you needed to buy something - maybe check this list first.

Review: Xubuntu 7.04 revisited

Filed under
Ubuntu

click: After trying quite a few Linux distributions that offer Xfce desktops (Slackware, Vector, ZenWalk, Debian), it was time to revisit Xubuntu 7.04, install it from scratch and see how it fares.

Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look

Filed under
Reviews

Unless you're able to deal with such esoteric problems as diagnosing a buggy post-install script, or figuring out how to deal with a major change in the directory structure of X.org, you might occasionally find running a Debian Sid-based system to be more than you can handle. And that's where Sidux comes in. Sidux's goal is to allow mere mortals the ability to run Debian Sid on the desktop, in order to take advantage of the latest Debian software available. Its development team helps guide its users through the occasional bumps in Sid, via IRC and its user forum. Another goal is to offer a consistent release cycle. Sidux comes with a variety of "convenience scripts" and utilities you won't find in Debian proper, that make it easier to do such things as administer your system and install proprietary software.

Linux: CFS Updates, -v20

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Ingo Molnar announced version 20 of his Completely Fair Scheduler patchset, offering further cleanups for the new scheduler code that will be part of the upcoming 2.6.23 kernel, "there have been lots of small regression fixes, speedups, debug enhancements and tidy-ups - many of which can be user-visible."

Glick brings better standalone application bundles to Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: There is value in experiments that aim to provide insight into the potential of alternate application deployment solutions or new technologies that could be used to augment existing package management systems. One such experiment is Glick.

Microsoft's Open Source Trashware

Filed under
Microsoft

eWeek: I recently took a look at Microsoft's most active open-source projects and—there's no polite way to say this—they are all junk.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to use GNOME to manage end users' desktops on SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10

  • Quick Tip: Firefox Ctrl+Tab Popup Menu Switcher
  • Automated failover and recovery of virtualized guests in Advanced Platform
  • Ubuntu: Mounting remote filesystem using sshfs (FUSE)
  • Beryl - Compiz-Fusion crash with Video playback?
  • How-To Configure “Hidden” Compiz/Xgl Effects (Updated)
  • Finding Advanced Settings on GNOME
  • /etc/rc.local
  • The awk Command
  • using the linux yes command

Linux vs. BSD, What's the Difference?

Filed under
BSD

linuxdevcenter: Ubuntu is known as Linux for Human Beings. PC-BSD, on the other hand, "has been designed with the casual computer user in mind.

Comprehensive integrity verification with md5deep

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Most of the ISO images and other software you grab off the Internet come with a message digest -- a cryptographic hash value that you can use to verify their integrity. While almost all Linux distributions come with utilities to read and generate digests using MD5 and SHA1 hash functions, the md5deep utilities can do that and more.

Unboxing My Dell Inspiron with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

gearlog.com: I spread out the CPU, LCD widescreen monitor, mouse, and keyboard on the living room floor. From there, I transferred all of the items to the office, and timed the set-up process: a quick 5 minutes and 49 seconds (Sorry Kyle's wife!) from plugging in to powering up to surfing PCMag.com. After I got the Internet working, I decided to be brave and install our F5D7000 Belkin Wireless G Card all by myself!

Stable kernel 2.6.22.5 is Out

Filed under
Linux

LWN: The 2.6.22.5 stable kernel update is out. It contains about 20 patches for serious problems; none of them appear to be security-related.

Linux Servers Continue Growth

Filed under
Linux

Linux Electrons: According to IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, factory revenue in the worldwide server market grew 6.3% year over year to $13.1 billion in the second quarter of 2007. This is the fifth consecutive quarter of positive revenue growth and the highest Q2 server revenue since the market peaked in 2000.

Managing and keeping tabs of network traffic on Linux

Filed under
Software

Rudd-O: Is your Net connection slow? Ever wonder what the hell’s going down the wire? Here are five free and effective tools to diagnose network traffic issues.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenELEC 8.0.2 Embedded Linux Entertainment OS Is Out with Mesa 17.0.4, More

The OpenELEC 8.0 open-source embedded Linux entertainment operating system received its second maintenance update, versioned 8.0.2, which fixes various issues reported by users lately and updates some core components. Read more

Red Hat Financial News

  • Red Hat announces latest version of Ansible
  • Red Hat On An Expansion Spree In India
    Red Hat is aggressively expanding its operations in India. The company recently announced the opening of two new offices in Bangalore and New Delhi. With the opening of the new offices, Red Hat is expanding its footprint in India with a goal of supporting interest for open source solutions and services from customers and partners and further promoting the benefits open source solutions can offer enterprises in India. Red Hat now has six offices in India, including additional facilities in Bangalore and New Delhi, and offices in Mumbai and Pune. Red Hat’s new Bangalore office is a 14,000 sq. ft. facility at Lavelle Road. It is designed to act as a training and enablement center for customers and partners. Through the new facility, which features a cafeteria, and space for networking, meetings, training and certification exams, and an indoor game zone, Red Hat aims to bring its open, collaborative culture to life. The additional New Delhi office is a 12,405 sq.ft facility located close to the international airport at Aerocity, designed with an eye toward enabling collaboration with customers throughout the region.
  • Somewhat Positive Press Coverage Very Likely to Affect Red Hat (RHT) Stock Price
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Releases Q1 Earnings Guidance

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Recursive DNS Server Fingerprint Problem

    Our goal is to identify hijacked resolvers by analyzing their fingerprints, in order to increase safety of Internet users. To do that, we utilize data collected via RIPE Atlas (atlas.ripe.net).

  • Online developer tutorials are spreading XSS and SQL injection flaws

    The researchers, from across three universities in Germany and Trend Micro, checked the PHP code bases of more than 64,000 projects on Github and uncovered more than 100 vulnerabilities that they believe might have been introduced as a result of developers picking up the code that they used from online tutorials.

  • BrickerBot, the permanent denial-of-service botnet, is back with a vengeance

    BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 104 in Stretch cycle
  • Webroot antivirus goes bananas, starts trashing Windows system files
    Webroot's security tools went berserk today, mislabeling key Microsoft Windows system files as malicious and temporarily removing them – knackering PCs in the process. Not only were people's individual copies of the antivirus suite going haywire, but also business editions and installations run by managed service providers (MSPs), meaning companies and organizations relying on the software were hit by the cockup. Between 1200 and 1500 MST (1800 and 2100 UTC) today, Webroot's gear labeled Windows operating system data as W32.Trojan.Gen – generic-Trojan-infected files, in other words – and moved them into quarantine, rendering affected computers unstable. Files digitally signed by Microsoft were whisked away – but, luckily, not all of them, leaving enough of the OS behind to reboot and restore the quarantined resources.
  • How The Update Framework Improves Security of Software Updates
    Updating software is one of the most important ways to keep users and organizations secure. But how can software be updated securely? That's the challenge that The Update Framework (TUF) aims to solve. Justin Cappos, assistant professor at New York University, detailed how TUF works and what's coming to further improve the secure updating approach in a session at last week's DockerCon 17 conference in Austin, Texas. Simply using HTTPS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure a download isn't enough as there have been many publicly reported instances of software repositories that have been tampered with, Cappos said.
  • Security Updates for Ubuntu Phone to End in June
    Security updates for Ubuntu phone and tablet will end this June, Canonical has confirmed. Current OTA updates are currently limited to critical fixes and security updates — a decision we were first to tell you back in January. But after June 2017 Canonical “will no longer deliver any further updates”.
  • Canonical to stop supporting Ubuntu Phone in June
    Canonical had already announced development of its Ubuntu Phone software was ending. Now we know when the final nail goes in the coffin: June.
  • Malware Hunts And Kills Poorly Secured Internet Of Things Devices Before They Can Be Integrated Into Botnets
    Researchers say they've discovered a new wave of malware with one purpose: to disable poorly secured routers and internet of things devices before they can be compromised and integrated into botnets. We've often noted how internet-of-broken-things devices ("smart" doorbells, fridges, video cameras, etc.) have such flimsy security that they're often hacked and integrated into botnets in just a matter of seconds after being connected to the internet. These devices are then quickly integrated into botnets that have been responsible for some of the worst DDoS attacks we've ever seen (including last October's attack on DYN).

GNOME/GTK News

  • The Way GNOME Handles Wallpapers Really Annoys Me
    I love GNOME Shell — and no, not just because I’ve little choice now that is Ubuntu’s default desktop! But the more I use GNOME the more I learn that the desktop environment, like every other, has its own share of quirks, bugs and inconsistencies. Like the following appreciably niche niggle in the the way GNOME handles desktop wallpapers.
  • Drag-and-drop in lists
    I’ve recently had an occasion to implement reordering of a GtkListBox via drag-and-drop (DND). It was not that complicated. Since I haven’t seen drag-and-drop used much with list boxes, here is a quick summary of what is needed to get the basics working.