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Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nexus 9 Review: A Powerful Tablet…for Android Die-Hards Only Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 1:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 9:28pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 9:26pm
Story How to Find the Best Linux Distribution for a Specific Task Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Red Hat releases Cloud Infrastructure version 5, expands Wipro partnership Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 8:26pm
Story Larry Augustin: Open source pioneer. SugarCRM CEO. Gym rat. Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 8:24pm
Story Linux Foundation: Open Source is Eating the Software World Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 8:20pm
Story The Linux desktop-a-week review: ChromeOS Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 8:17pm
Story Atomic Mode-Setting Moves Along For KMS Drivers Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 8:13pm


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SUSE Some may know about the Geeko’s Tube, I’m not so sure that many do though. There has been for a while now, this is the official repository of videos by openSUSE people.

Record your desktop with Linux tools

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Software You can capture video of all of the amazing things happening on your desktop with one of Linux's many screencasting applications. These programs are perfect for creating demonstrations for blogs and tutorials, and for illustrating projects with more than just still images.

Wine sucks and I'm not going to pretend otherwise

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yokozar.livejournal: Wine is a lot like my cell phone. It sucks, but it would be really awesome if it didn't. As much as we'd like to, we can't give up on it entirely. So the only reasonable thing to do is try and make it suck less.

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Cairo-Dock - Desktop dock for openSUSE Linux

  • Inkscape tutorial: creating a simple ribbon
  • Howto use SSH local and remote port forwarding
  • Faking filesystem access
  • Portscan in one line
  • VirtualBox in Gentoo
  • Ubuntu Linux Install GDesklets GNOME Program
  • Putting Ubuntu on the R400
  • Recursive FTP with the command line
  • Customizing Amonymous Comments In Drupal
  • Fixing Windows MBR with Ubuntu 8.04.1 Live-CD
  • Fix Your MTRR on Gentoo with Thinkpad x61 Intel x3100
  • A Guide to Linux Graphics Software 01: bitmap vs vector

Desktop Linux still DOA

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Linux One of the great tech non-events of the last few years involves Linux on PCs. Every so often, another wave of hype washes in about how companies are finally going to ditch their Windows machines in favour of the open-source operating system and productivity apps.

8 Useful Adobe AIR Applications That Work In Linux

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Software While we have previously covered some of the cool AIR applications, most of them are meant for the Windows/Mac platform. For Linux users who are constantly looking for AIR applications, here is a list of 8 useful AIR applications that we have tested and found them to be working in Linux.

Today’s the big day: openSUSE Day at LinuxWorld Expo

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zonker.opensuse: Hello from San Francisco! LinuxWorld Expo is going pretty well so far — we ran out of DVDs at the booth yesterday, which was a pleasant problem to have.

Reiser4 Update

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Linux "I have had to apply the reiser4 patches from -mm kernels to vanilla based patchset for over a year now. Reiser4 works fine, what will it take to get it included in vanilla?" began a brief thread on the Linux Kernel mailing list. Theodore Ts'o offered several links detailing the reamining issues with Reiser4.

We Don't Need Another Linux Hater

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Linux While going over Linux Hater's Blog, I can best describe it as Béranger on anabolic steroids. I'm sorry if I can't find a better description than that, but for clarity sake, I would simply put Linux Hater's blog as a series of rants against Linux as well as other open source software.

Low-power netbooks run Linux

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Hardware A Germany-based retailer called One is shipping four branded, Linux-based netbooks that consume only 3.5 Watts apiece. The One A440, A110, A115, and A140 are all based on the Via C7-M Ultra Low Voltage processor (ULV), and come with integrated Via graphics chips.

A New Acceleration Architecture For X

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Software XAA, or the XFree86 Acceleration Architecture, is over twelve years old and finally in 2005 it was greeted by a replacement, EXA. EXA was designed to offer speed improvements over XAA by accelerating more options and enhancing X's RENDER extension.

Ulteo: What Gael Did Next

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reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: Almost immediately upon leaving Mandrakesoft, he began making teasing statements about his next project, claiming it would revolutionise the way we use computers. The Ulteo project, as it became known, was all about freeing us from our home desktops.

9 + 5 things you’ll get with Fedora 10

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Linux Fedora 10 will be released on 28th October 2008, let’s take a look at what some of the upcoming features, 9 of them have been accepted by the team, 5 more are still in the “proposed” state.

interesting Press Releases

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  • Freespire Returns to Debian Roots

  • VMware Joins The Linux Foundation
  • gOS Announces gOS 3 Gadgets -- the Newest Version of Its Linux OS

Mozilla reveals the Firefox of the future?

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Moz/FF Mozilla has unveiled a spectacular new concept browser, dubbed Aurora. The bleeding-edge browser is part of a new Mozilla Labs initiative, in which the open-source foundation is encouraging people to contribute ideas and designs for the browser of the future.

Linux is a platform, not an OS

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Linux There is one thing that many people have yet failed to realize, and that is that Linux is a platform, not an OS. Now as bizarre as that may sound, if you truly think about it, you'll realize that I'm right.

Opendocument format

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OSS The Open Document Format (ODF) is an ISO standardized method of storing rich text and other office data. The ODF standard has grown in popularity over the last years quite a bit. Many governments around the world have passed laws stating that any sort of communication between the government and its people has to be done in ODF.

LinuxWorld 2008 - nobody cares

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blogs.the451group: There are certain phrases that we tend to hear a lot from vendors — ‘enterprise-class, best of breed, customer choice,’ etc. However, I was repeatedly hearing somewhat surprising phrases as I made the rounds at LinuxWorld this year: ‘We don’t care, customers don’t care, no one cares …”

Of Kids and Linux

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Linux LinuxWorld is planning a good old-fashioned install-fest for their San Francisco conference. And if you have an old PC or can bluff your way through an Ubuntu install, you're invited to participate. Ah, the kids! God bless the younger generation. That is the hope for Free and Open Source Software.

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Android Leftovers

LG releases webOS Open Source Edition, looks to expand webOS usage

LG’s smart TVs ship with an operating system called webOS, which is the latest version of an operating system that was developed by Palm to run on phones, acquired by HP to use with tablets, and eventually sold to LG, which is still using it today. But now LG wants to expand the adoption of webOS and the company is working with the South Korean government to solicit business proposals from other companies interested in using webOS. LG has also released a webOS Open Source Edition version of the operating system. Read more

Test driving 4 open source music players and more

In my last article, I described my latest music problem: I need an additional stage of amplification to make proper use of my new phono cartridge. While my pre-amplifier contains a phono stage, its gain is only suitable for cartridges that output about 5mV, whereas my new cartridge has a nominal output of 0.4mV. Based on my investigation, I liked the looks of the Muffsy phono kits, so I ordered the head amplifier, the power supply, and the back panel. I also needed to obtain a case to hold the boards and the back panel, available online from many vendors. Muffsy does not sell the “wall wart” necessary to power the unit, so I ordered one of those from a supplier in California. Finally, inspecting my soldering iron, solder “sucker,” and solder, I’ve realized I need to do better—so a bit more shopping, online or local, is in order there. Finally, for those, like me, whose soldering skills may be rusty and perhaps were not all that great to begin with, Muffsy kindly offers links to two instructional videos. Read more

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