Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Battle Brews Over Firefox In Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Firefox, what's not to love about this open-source web browser? Well, a number of users following the development work on Ubuntu 8.10 (the Intrepid Ibex) are feeling rather outraged over Mozilla Firefox 3.0.2 and later. In the latest Ubuntu packages, Firefox requires an EULA (End-User License Agreement) be accepted the first time you launch the browser.

mythtv: A personal TV recorder

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: No one likes to sit at home and wait for their favorite show to come on anymore and many have turned to buying hardware to record them for later viewing. Popular solutions to this problem include the expensive and proprietary TiVo and cable/satellite boxes with built-in TV recorders. MythTV aims to solve these problems without the need to rent a cable box ($15/month) or buy a TiVo (~$200).

Cousin MilaX

Filed under
OS

kmandla.wordpress: A thoughtful forum member sent me a PM mentioning MilaX, which employs a lot of the lightweight software I mention here, and some more that I mention here. I promised to take a look at it and today, I finally got a free moment to do just that.

Two betas in the road to Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Two betas in the road to Firefox 3.1

  • 5 Useful Tips to Customise Firefox 3
  • about:addons - Sep 13

gOS 3 Google Gadgets Review

Filed under
Linux

penguinway.net: This weekend I decided to take the Linux distribution known as gOS for a spin. The gOS is an Ubuntu 8.04.1 derivative that shows some promise with it’s integration of Web applications. Although they are not affilated with Google, gOS has incorporated many Google online tools into their desktop.

What is happening in the world of Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: I have been talking about Ubuntu for a number of articles now and how easy it is to use. In this article I will look at the next two upcoming versions and investigate what they have to offer.

What To Look For In Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Previously, I covered some features that might be included in Fedora 10. Today, here are some interesting features that have already been approved.

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Word-of-mouth is Linux’s best bet for success

  • What is with the all Linux users?
  • Things I Miss in Linux
  • Big LOL at a Linux old-timer
  • Why Linux funding will skyrocket
  • Linux: It’s Not About Winning
  • Recording Sound in Kubuntu 8.10 (running KDE 4.1)
  • Dell Mini 9 Netbook Unboxing
  • The commonwealth fights back against OOXML?
  • My First Linux Encounter or How to Switch to Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Writing a Shell Script

  • Basic Linux commands for Beginner’s
  • Making the most of the acer aspire one
  • playing m4a song files in Amarok
  • Speed up Amarok with Large Music Collections
  • DynDNS plus SSH
  • Installing Gentoo from a LiveCD or Desktop using LVM
  • Removing annoying “The media contains digital photos”
  • Dual boot linux and mac osx leopard kalyway 10.5.2

Fedora 9 Review (also Gnome in Fedora 9 Part 2)

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: Once KDE 4.1 was finally out and most of the complaints had stopped, I took the plunge. I am actually very happy with Fedora 9. I think most of the reviews you may have read criticizing Fedora 9 focused on the initial version.

Unigine Tropics Sets Linux OpenGL Precedence

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Unigine Tropics is set around a tropical environment (hence its name) and it runs through various scenes of an island during both the day and night. Some of its technical features though include a dynamic sky with light scattering, live water with a surf zone and caustics, special materials for vegetation, HDR rendering, parallel split shadow map for the sun, depth of field, and real-time ambient occlusion.

The Difference Between Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

debiantoday.com: Since Ubuntu showed up on the scene many people have asked what the differences between the Debian based distribution and Debian GNU/Linux actually are. Ubuntu as most of you know is very much like Debian in many ways from the package system to the user community Debian and Ubuntu have done a great job coinciding.

Introducing the darkest power of PowerDevil

Filed under
KDE

drfav.wordpress: Some of you might know what PowerDevil is, some might not; well, for you who fear this is yet another attempt of threatening your lives, PowerDevil is a power manager for KDE4, and it won’t kill you.

The Problem with Windows

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: The world’s most popular operating system is Windows, which is made by the Microsoft Corporation. Linux has no links with Windows at all. Microsoft doesn’t contribute anything to Linux and, in fact, is rather hostile toward it, because it threatens Microsoft’s market dominance. This means that installing Linux can give you an entirely Microsoft-free PC.

C-DAC inks MoU with ELCOT to deploy BOSS Linux

Filed under
Linux

topnews.in: The scope of this strategic alliance between C-DAC and ELCOT is to install BOSS Linux across the state in all Government departments for their productivity application and e-Governance applications, large scale promotional activities in the areas of Open source Software, e-Governance, setting up of BOSS Linux support centre within ELCOT campus.

The Linux naming strategy

Filed under
Linux

sathyaphoenix.wordpress: I had always wondered why ppl keep wierd names for the linux distros and it turns out tht they are not indeed wierd and i googled for the naming strategy of fedora and Ubuntu and here are the results…

some odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Making feh work for you

  • whowatch - Monitor who is doing what on your system
  • Ask Linux.com: document wrangling, lighter distros, and Boot Loops II
  • Enhanced Debugging With Gallium3D
  • Crowdsourcing: Many Are Smarter Than One

Chinese Penguin Love: The Lenovo and Linux Story

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Speaking from China, Tux the penguin says "the reports of my death are greatly exaggerated" as the media continues to report that Lenovo is slaying the kernel mascot with the relish of a Canadians near a seal pup. iTWire digs a little deeper to reveal just WTF is really happening with Lenovo and Linux...

Why I Can't Wait for PCLinuxOS 2008

Filed under
PCLOS

junauza.com: Though PCLOS is not my most favorite Linux distro, I honestly consider it as one of the best. I have used the May 2007 stable release version and I was really impressed with almost all of its features. For now, I'll act like a fanboy and write a short list of expectations for the upcoming PCLinuxOS 2008(?).

(K)(X)Ubuntu Alternatives

Filed under
Linux

molom.wordpress: I’ll admit it, I really dislike Ubuntu and its official variants (Kubuntu & Xubuntu). The reason why is because many believe that its the only proper user-friendly distribution available. Well… There are more and better alternatives to Ubuntu.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Debian, Elive, and Ubuntu

  • Re-elected as Debian Project Leader
    I have been extremely proud to have served as the Debian Project Leader since my election in early 2017. During this time I've learned a great deal about the inner workings of the Project as well as about myself. I have grown as a person thanks to all manner of new interactions and fresh experiences. I believe is a privilege simply to be a Debian Developer, let alone to be selected as their representative. It was therefore an even greater honour to learn that I have been re-elected by the community for another year. I profoundly and wholeheartedly thank everyone for placing their trust in me for another term.
  • Elive 3.0 is ALMOST here!
    Elive's latest beta, 2.9.90, was released a couple of weeks ago. According to the description, this is the last beta before the official release of version 3.0. I have been waiting for Elive for quite a long time. My first contact with it was through a live CD of version 2.0 Topaz in 2010, when I had recently migrated to Linux. I was truly impressed by the beauty and polish of the distro. I never installed it, though. I was put off by the fact that it was the only distro that could not be installed unless one paid for an installing module. Back then, I assumed that free software had to be "gratis".
  • NGINX Updates: Ubuntu Bionic, and Mainline and Stable PPAs
    Ubuntu Bionic 18.04 now has 1.14.0 in the repositories, and very likely will have 1.14.0 for the lifecycle of 18.04 from April of 2018 through April of 2023, as soon as it is released.
  • gksu removed from Ubuntu

More Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Prospects for free software in cars
    Car manufacturers, like most companies, navigate a narrow lane between the benefits of using free and open-source software and the perceived or real importance of hiding their trade secrets. Many are using free software in some of the myriad software components that make up a modern car, and even work in consortia to develop free software. At the recent LibrePlanet conference, free-software advocate Jeremiah Foster covered progress in the automotive sector and made an impassioned case for more free software in their embedded systems. Foster has worked in automotive free software for many years and has played a leading role in the GENIVI Alliance, which is dedicated to incorporating free software into in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems. He is currently the community manager for the GENIVI Alliance. First, Foster talked about the importance of software in modern vehicles. He pointed out that software increasingly becomes the differentiator used to market cars. Horsepower no longer sells these vehicles, Foster says—features do. He claims that some companies even sell the car at cost (the old "razor/blades" or "printer/ink" business model) and make their money on aftermarket apps and features. Companies are finding it effective to get hardware from other manufacturers while improving the user experience through their software. Some of these features contribute to safety (such as alerts that help you drive within the lane or parallel park), and some may be critical, such dashboard icons that warn the driver of electrical system problems or low brake fluid.
  • Productising open source integration
    We asked Lumina Networks’ CEO Andrew Coward, how companies can make best use of open source. “Open source is not a spectator sport,” says Andrew. “Sitting around and waiting for somebody to show up and deliver the equivalent of your existing vendor’s offering is not the right approach. So we work best when our customers are very engaged. And really, it’s all about how you automate things.”
  • Riot: A Distributed Way of Having IRC and VOIP Client and Home Server
    Riot is a free and open source decentralized instant messaging application that can be considered an alternative to Slack. We take a look at features of Riot, installation procedure and usage. It’s surprising that many Linux users and open source projects use a proprietary messaging service like Slack. Even we at It’s FOSS use Slack for our internal communication which I don’t like. This is why I came up with the proposal of using an open source alternative to Slack, called Riot.
  • Announcing the 2018 Fractal Hackfest
    For the past few months, I’ve been contributing to a new group messaging app called Fractal. Its aim is to be so good that we can maybe, eventually, finally replace IRC as the primary communication channel for GNOME development.
  • The ticking time bomb: Fake ad blockers in Chrome Web Store
    People searching for a Google Chrome ad blocking extension have to choose from dozens of similarly named extensions. Only few of these are legitimate, most are forks of open source ad blockers trying to attract users with misleading extension names and descriptions. What are these up to? Thanks to Andrey Meshkov we now know what many people already suspected: these extensions are malicious. He found obfuscated code hidden carefully within a manipulated jQuery library that accepted commands from a remote server.
  • Google Chrome now blocks autoplaying video with sound

    Video that plays without audio, or that a user has tapped or clicked on, will still play. On mobile, autoplaying videos will be allowed on sites that have been added as a bookmark to the home screen, while desktop sites that a user frequently actively watches video on will be allowed to autoplay videos with sound as ranked by the firm’s new Media Engagement Index (MEI).

  • Israeli Government Is Open Sourcing Its Software Code
    Just yesterday, we told you about German government’s decision to go ahead with an open source solution for creating its private cloud. The government announced a partnership with Nextcloud, which is a popular open source solutions provider. In another encouraging development for the open source enthusiasts, the Israeli government has decided to open source its software code. As a result, the released code will be available to public and free to reuse.