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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A Linux Valentine - Oh Linux, how do I love thee?

Filed under
Linux
Humor

linuxhow2.com: Way number 1: You breathe new life into old hardware. They should age PCs in dog years. Here's a trusted dog year calendar that helped me better determine the age of my Laptop. My three-year old laptop is going on 25 dog years now, and Windows is like the Army, and 25 year old recruits are starting to get too old to put on the front lines.

Elive distro illustrates power, beauty of Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The Elive Linux distribution combines beauty with ease of use. Elive is based on Debian and uses Enlightenment as its windows manager, which gives the distribution a Mac OS X look and feel. Elive comes with dozens of easy-to-use desktop applications that just work.

Red Hat 11th fastest growing company in America

Filed under
Linux

linuxhelp.blogspot: Forbes magazine recently compiled a list of the top 25 fastest growing companies in America. And guess what, Red Hat is placed 11th in the list.

Free/Open-source Digital Audio Editors

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: A digital audio editor is a computer application for audio editing or digital audio manipulation. I have here a list of well-known free/open-source digital audio editors for the music enthusiasts, professionals and non-professionals alike.

Will OpenOffice.org 3.0 be better?

Filed under
OOo

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Following on from my piece on whether OpenOffice.org can do the job I have remembered that OpenOffice.org 3.0 is due for release in September. So—with my comments on 2.3 in mind—let’s see whether the new version will address my needs.

Open-Source Creative X-Fi Support

Filed under
Software

phoronix: Last Friday 4Front Technologies had released the binaries and source-code to OSS 4.0 Build 1013. This new build of the Open Sound System brings two major changes, which include the full source code now being available for the M-Audio Revolution and Delta sound card drivers, and a beta driver for the Sound Blast X-Fi series from Creative Labs.

Q and A with Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

smh.com.au: At last week's linux.conf.au gathering in Melbourne, Nick Miller talked to Linux creator Linus Torvalds about his work and ambitions for his operating system.

Also: Photos: Linux.conf.au 2008

Your Portage tree just got 200MB smaller

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org/news: Each ebuild in the Portage tree used to come with its own digest file. When you emerged a package, this digest was used to verify that you had the same files the developer did. Until now.

Just Installed PCLinuxOS for my folks

Filed under
PCLOS

gresak.com: This past weekend, I used one of our old desktop computers to install a copy of PCLinuxOS 2007. I took this updated system over to my parents house for them to try out as an alternative to their aging Windows XP system.

Why even use Linux??

Filed under
Linux

linuxloader.com: Why do I use Linux? I get that question quite a bit. Depending on who I'm talking to my response varies. Some of the more technical reasons leave many users with a blank stare. If you're reading this I assume you are either already running Linux or are about too. Well...... why are you doing it? Lets take a look at some of the reasons.

OpenSUSE's new tech evangelist spells it out

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

computerworlduk.com: Novell has joined the trend in appointing a community manager for its SUSE Linux distribution. Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier spells out what it is all about.

Village School Director Backs Linux

Filed under
Linux

kommersant.com: Alexander Ponosov, director of the school in the village of Sepych, Perm Territory, who has found guilty of installing pirated Windows software in 12 school computers, has changed jobs. He is now engaged in popularizing the free Linux operating system.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to get a Quake-like terminal session in Ubuntu by tapping the ‘~’ key

  • How to Deploy Linux From the Data Center to the Desktop
  • 2008 will be the year of the open source CMS
  • There is no Year of the Linux Desktop
  • Microsoft says to borrow money for Yahoo deal
  • Cursor behavior in OOo Calc
  • Apache sees modest market share gain
  • Google's Android Hits a Few Snags, But Feature Details Emerge
  • Is NVIDIA Buying AGEIA Good For Linux?
  • Keeping your system clock synchronized
  • Short Tip: Create a patch and use it in rpm
  • U CAN HAS LOLcats on Linux with Ruby and GTK
  • Linux on mainframes made easy
  • MySQL root password recovery under linux
  • BackupPC 3.1.0 for Ubuntu
  • DRI2 Comes Closer To Its Debut
  • The Rock-n-Roll DOSBox Freak Show

Eventually all of the [US] Army's networks will be Linux-based

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: The goal of the US Army is to move from Windows to Linux. In the meantime, the Army has to find ways to make the two work together. It's turning to Red Hat to do so and to a group of internal IT professionals to create a "Battle Command" that will explore how to move the Army from 20th-century Windows to 21st-century Linux.

Know your code, know open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: It used to be there were only a couple of players in town who combed through software code, specifically looking for open source packages and licenses: Black Duck and Palamida. A year ago, we figured there was plenty of room for additional players, but we had no idea how many companies would end up coming to the open source code scanning table.

Yahoo's Openness Asset

linuxjournal.com: What if Yahoo's main value isn't its search engine or its advertising business, but the openness that makes it more Net-native and hacker-friendly than Microsoft?

Chyrp: A lightweight tool for simple blogging

Filed under
Software

linux.com: High-end open source blogging applications may have all the features you can think of, but you may not need all that. For simple blogs, a lightweight alternative like Chyrp is worth a closer look.

GNU/something

Filed under
OS

polishlinux.org: Let me ask you a basic question: Which operating system do you use? What are the possible answers? Windows, Linux, Solaris or Mac OS X of course. But let us try to think different for a moment. Maybe it is possible, that this answer would be it is Nexenta GNU/OpenSolaris.

CMake: simple, effective and efficient

Filed under
Software

rg03.wordpress: Writing programs that support multiple platforms is sometimes complicated. The bigger the program is, the closer to the system it is and the more libraries it uses, the more complicated it is to keep it multiplatform. When someone realized typing the compiler commands by hand everytime they wanted to rebuild a project was tiresome at best, they had to do something.

There's more to Linux than Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

thetechandcents.com: I've told a million times by now, that I am a Linux person. I like the operating system, the tools, the applications, the works. I like the process. I like the community. I like the people. And all these positive feelings are not distribution-specific. I read more and more stories about Linux in general where term "Linux" is quite replaced by Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.