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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Another reason to love FOSS - Software Kill Switches

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: One thing I hate above almost anything else is when a vendor tells you what you can and can't do with your software. That drives me bonkers. So what brought on this little bout of ranting and bitterness?

Mandriva 2009 Alpha 2 Brings You a Beautiful KDE 4 Desktop

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MDV

softpedia.com: Mandriva announced last night the second alpha release of Mandriva 2009, which brings KDE4 (default desktop), GNOME 2.23.4, and support for the newest NVIDIA and ATI/AMD video cards. The development cycle of Mandriva 2009 will continue until the final release in early October, 2008. With the 2009 edition.

New Compiz plugins

Filed under
Software

compiz-fusion.org/~cyberorg: …some useful some not so, these are the new plugins available in compiz-fusion-plugins-git packages from openSUSE Build Service repository.

Ubuntu Translator Tools

Filed under
Software

glatzor.de: In which package can I translate this message/dialog? What is the difference between these two po files? How can I access the translation page of a package in a faster way compared to clicking through the whole website tree or manipulating the url? Where can I get the automatically updated language packs?

Canonical hopes Best Buy Ubuntu will spur Linux adoption

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: Linux distributor Canonical is putting a price tag on packaged Ubuntu installation CDs and making them available for purchase on shelves in retail stores. The question, however, is whether the package delivers enough additional value to justify the cost. The answer, according to Canonical, is the ValuSoft startup support.

Is Ubuntu really easier? Is Pepsi really better than Coke?

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Ubuntu

jaysonrowe.wordpress: One thing that does irritate me is bickering between different camps in the Linux community. Each thinks that their distribution is the best, and should be used by every living, breathing and eating human being – ’nuff said. I really feel that this is a dangerous attitude, and I feel that this is an attitude that is going to continue to hurt Linux over all rather than help.

What is so good about Linux?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Whenever I have conversations with people about windows and Linux they always ask me what is so good about Linux. They see something that looks pretty and gives them a wow factor but it is not enough. I can talk about Linux's superior multitasking and hardware support or security against virus's and spyware and I get the gazed donut look in pretty short order.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Plasma Weather Meeting and things to come...

  • Ubuntu Photo Manager Experiment
  • Gentoo Install - Day 3
  • 4 New Feature Proposed for Fedora 10
  • I converted to Ubuntu…
  • Ballmer: We'll look at open source, but we won't touch
  • Just because you are not paranoid doesn't mean they are not reading your Gmail
  • Canadian open source community upset over proposed copyright law
  • Lotus Symphony: Big Blue Got It Right This Time
  • Geek panties.
  • Fermi Scientific Linux. What is it?
  • Can the Average Lawyer Install An Ubuntu Linux Server? (Part II)
  • Home Automation and Media Projects
  • Tree-signing in Gentoo and recent research into Package Manager Security

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to stop printing in Linux

  • Using the 'find' command
  • 5 Tips to Make Working with the Shell Easier
  • Virtualbox vs. VMware Server
  • Howto Install VirtualBox 1.6 in Ubuntu
  • KDE: Right Click, Extract Here
  • Using GNU Screen on a Remote Machine
  • K9Copy - DVD Backup Tool

New research bots underscore AI's embrace of open-source

Filed under
OSS

eetimes.com: Though not the first open-source robot, iCub underscores a trend that is poised to increase the productivity of artificial-intelligence (AI) researchers, in the same way the open-source movement has enhanced work in other sectors of design.

SabayonLinux 3.5 - Review

Filed under
Linux

planetoss.com: After nearly a year of hard work, Sabayon team has released their new Gentoo based Linux, SabayonLinux 3.5 on 1st July 2008. Sabayon is the most successful project in making Gentoo beginner friendly.

5 reasons to avoid iPhone 3G

fsf.org/blogs: The 5 real reasons to avoid iPhone 3G: * iPhone completely blocks free software. Developers must pay a tax to Apple, who becomes the sole authority over what can and can't be on everyone's phones.

Plans for Gtk+/GNOME 3.0 surfaced

Filed under
Linux

liquidat.wordpress: At the GNOME conference GUADEC plans were presented how the transition to the new Gtk and GNOME is supposed to happen. The basic idea is to make the transition as smooth as possible by first cleaning up everything and introducing new concepts later on.

Why you want (and need) a Linux Live CD

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: For the most part, on this blog, I try to convince readers to do something defensive on their computers - like a parent nagging a child to eat their vegetables. Only once have I put my foot down, so to speak, saying unequivocally last year that all Windows XP users should employ DropMyRights. Now, another emphatic endorsement - all Windows users should have a Linux Live CD, and, know how to use it.

Why Debian's Still a Great Distro Choice

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Linux

blogs.pcmag.com: Every year or so, there's a new Linux distro darling. Last year's was Ubuntu, and I've lost track of what this year's favorite penguin might be. But a lot of newcomers to Linux seem to get the impression that a new distro is better than an older package because there'll be more attention paid to new technologies and easier user interfaces. In fact, pretty much the opposite is true.

UT3 Linux Client Is "In The Works"

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: It's been 234 days (or just shy of eight months) since Unreal Tournament 3 had shipped for the PC. Most would have thought the Linux client for this title from Epic Games would have arrived by now, but sadly it hasn't and there is no sign of when it will arrive.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 2 released

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 2 is released today. This alpha introduces KDE 4 - 4.1 beta 2, specifically - as the default version of KDE, and the latest development version of GNOME, 2.23.4. The kernel has also been updated to 2.6.26rc7. Mandriva warns that this is a true alpha, likely to contain many bugs related to the new version of KDE.

Sidux, a Great Alternative to Ubuntu, Part 2

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Last week we introduced ourselves to Sidux, the excellent Debian Sid implementation that makes Debian Sid a bit friendlier. Even though I thought I gave a number of reasons why a user might prefer Sidux to Debian Sid, or Ubuntu, or some other Debian derivative, they apparently were not clear to a number of readers.

Microsoft ditched as Anglicans go open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com.au: The Sydney Diocese of the Anglican Church has decided to cut the Microsoft umbilical cord by moving to open source, starting with Office which will be replaced in the next three years.

Bible Software on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

ubuntuproductivity.com: I am keenly interested in software that can help when studying the Bible. Coming from the Mac OS where there are no good Bible software offerings anything would be a blessing. So, for all you fellow Ubuntu-using Christians here is what I found.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

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