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Tuesday, 22 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Adobe Opens Lightroom's Door to Android Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 11:53pm
Story Unzip Vulnerability Closed in Ubuntu OSes Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 11:45pm
Story Manjaro Xfce 0.9.0 Pre1 Shows How Open Source Collaboration Works Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 11:39pm
Story `ALBERT`: A FAST, LIGHTWEIGHT QUICK LAUNCHER FOR LINUX Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 11:31pm
Story Ubuntu Could Be the First OS on Planet Mars Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 11:20pm
Story Analysis Of The Top 10 Linux Distributions Of 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 10:53pm
Story Cinnamon 2.6 to Get Systemd Support Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 10:24pm
Story 5 favorite Raspberry Pi and Arduino projects Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 10:05pm
Story Security problems need to be made public: Linus Torvalds Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 9:49pm
Story What’s new in SUSE LINUX 12? Rianne Schestowitz 19/01/2015 - 9:33pm

Why do we Release openSUSE on Thursdays - or why do we Slip?

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger: openSUSE 11.1 Beta3 is a bit later than expected (it should go out later today). Of course, this raised couple of questions why. So let me explain how a build of a Beta release works in general from release manager perspective and what are the reasons for the slip.

Hey, Dad…Can I have Linux back?

Filed under
Linux

education.zdnet: My oldest son, creator of flame wars, finally discovered that you can only surf to the nether regions of the Internet so many times before even Vista business succumbs to malware. His computer an unusable mass of pop-ups, spewing traffic over our network actually asked me tonight to reinstall Linux for him.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS Magazine October 2008 Released

  • Mac OS is better than Ubuntu Linux: A myth
  • Tracking down license infringements with the GPL Compliance Engineering Guide
  • Let's Dance: Learning The Samba
  • Fooling windows by dancing the samba with Linux
  • ScreenCast: Fedora Talk with Twinkle
  • Foresight 2.0.5 review - First Impressions
  • A Week Of Open Source Riches
  • Novell Open Enterprise beta targets Netware users
  • Mozilla Developer News 10/21
  • Symbian seeks to attract developers with open-source code
  • Android is now Open Source
  • Encrypt CD/DVDs
  • Apricot netbook ditches Linux
  • Gentoo-Wiki, Gentoo-portage Down
  • Linux Carried Along on Netbooks Wave
  • Is commercial open source possible?
  • Improve MySQL performance with MySQLTuner
  • Sending Email From Your System with sSMTP
  • BBC Weather
  • Indamixx sound box plays on Linux base
  • Red Hat promises open-source virtualization technology
  • Change (gk)sudo timeout
  • Examining the compilation process. part 2.
  • Interview With David Ascher And Dan Mosedale - Thunderbird - Mozilla Messaging

Plat'Home Unveils Final Results of "Will Linux Work?"

Filed under
Linux

PR: Plat'Home today announced the results of the "Will Linux Work?" contest. For the past month, Plat'Home's OpenMicroServer (OMS) has been in the hands of the four contest winners who have put Linux to the test.

Release your creative side with Ubuntu Studio

Filed under
Ubuntu

greenhughes.com: Often when we talk about Linux it is often in the context of a computer enthusiast, a person who enjoys finding out what open source technology can do for them. A group that sometimes we don't think about is our creative friends, artists, musicians, animators, audio engineers, video editors and suchlike.

The Goal of Funtoo

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: A lot of people have asked me recently “What is the goal of Funtoo? What are you trying to do?” Here’s an explanation of what Funtoo is about.

Kernel Log: More than 10 million lines of Linux source files

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: After the release of Linux 2.6.27, kernel developers are currently busily integrating patches for the next kernel version into the main development branch of Linux. This usually involves discarding some old code and adding new code thouhg on balance, there are usually more new lines than old ones, making the kernel grow continually.

Who Are The Real Friends of Linux and Free Software?

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: Ken Starks is one of my favorite people. He is the prime mover behind Komputers 4 Kids, Tux500, and Lindependence 2008. He makes his living selling and supporting Linux systems to businesses and home users. You won't find Ken wasting his days infesting online forums and chats with windy opinionating and beating up noobs-- Ken is a man of action with a direct approach to solving problems.

plasma is now feature complete?

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: The following covers features and material that will be available in 4.2, which will not be released until January 2009.

some shorts

Filed under
News
  • YaST Mascot Contest

  • Obama Ubuntu
  • Richard Stallman at U of M Tonight
  • All the Linux Mint flavors now on nicely printed CDs

Minisys Linux: Puppy on steroids

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Puppy Linux makes it easy to remaster its distribution, which probably explains the sheer number of Puppy Linux variants, called puplets, in the wild. Minisys Linux, or Muppy, is an interesting puplet in the form of a modular Linux distro based on a Puppy Linux and Slackware 12 mix.

Microsoft’s new “Global Anti-Piracy Day” must have Linux users laughing

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft’s new “Global Anti-Piracy Day” must have Linux users laughing

  • Pirates scoff at Microsoft's anti-piracy day
  • Microsoft’s “Don’t Talk Like a Pirate” day

Idiot of the Year! Ignorant Linux Writer…

Filed under
Linux

molom.wordpress: I can’t stand hearing ignorant idiotic individuals when they start posting utter rubbish on forums, but when they post their own opinion on an article, it makes me laugh for quite a while because it really reveals how much of an idiot this individual may be.

Bridging the Linux chasm

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Most people will agree on what a commercial distro is. it is fairly obvious. A distro that is funded and backed by a company. Then there is the wild west world of "Community" distros.

10 Fun Firefox Add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

junauza.com: We all know that Firefox has hundreds of great add-ons to enhance our web browsing experience. Since there are already plenty of lists out there that features some of the most essential add-ons, I'm left with sharing to you all this collection of fun Firefox add-ons.

Desktop Unix: MacOS X and SUSE Linux

Filed under
OS

zdnet.com/Murphy: All three of the main OS candidates: MacOS X, Novell’s “Sousa Linicks” and Microsoft’s Windows Vista run on pretty much the same hardware and run broadly comparable applications suites, so the decision must ultimately come down to which one best balances cost versus productivity in your applications area.

GIMP 2.6 changes are mostly internal

Filed under
GIMP

linux.com: The GIMP -- the GNU Image Manipulation Program -- is one of the flagships of free software. On October 1 the project released version 2.6, with many new and improved features. Most of the user-visible features are just polish; the real changes are lurking under the hood.

Flash 10 on Linux: Better, not great, better

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: Adobe Flash is still a proprietary program and I, and a lot of other open-source people, wish that it wasn't. That said, the latest Flash Player 10 on Linux is a lot faster than the last version and it opens up the doors to a lot of Web-based video content.

Firestarter - A modern Linux Firewall

Filed under
Software

brajeshwar.com: Irrespective of the operating system, intrusion is one of the key concerns for computers connected to a network. Firewalls, as a matter of fact provide a resistance to this, if not a fool proof protection.

Four password lockers that can help you keep your Web logins secure

Filed under
Software

linux.com: It is good practice to use a different password for each Web site you need to log in to. Good passwords tend to be long and contain a wide selection of characters. That can make remembering all your passwords difficult. But you can make things easier on yourself by storing passwords for various Web sites in an encrypted file on your computer.

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More in Tux Machines

Server/OSS: Data Storage, OpenStack, Nextcloud, Puppet

  • Open Source Storage: 64 Applications for Data Storage
    As data storage needs continue to grow and many organizations move toward software-defined infrastructure, more enterprises are using open source software to meet some of their storage needs. Projects like Hadoop, Ceph, Gluster and others have become very common at large enterprises. Home users and small businesses can also benefit from open source storage software. These applications can make it possible to set up your own NAS or SAN device using industry-standard hardware without paying the high prices vendors charge for dedicated storage appliances. Open source software also offers users the option to set up a cloud storage solution where they have control over security and privacy, and it can also offer affordable options for backup and recovery.
  • OpenStack Moves Beyond the Cloud to Open Infrastructure
    The OpenStack Summit got underway on May 21, with a strong emphasis on the broader open-source cloud community beyond just the OpenStack cloud platform itself. At the summit, the OpenStack Foundation announced that it was making its open-source Zuul continuous development, continuous integration (CI/CD) technology a new top level standalone project. Zuul has been the underlying DevOps CI/CD system that has been used for the past six years, to develop and test the OpenStack cloud platform.
  • OpenStack makes Zuul continuous delivery tool its second indie project
    The OpenStack Foundation has launched its Zuul continuous delivery and integration tool as a discrete project. Zuul is therefore Foundation’s second project other than OpenStack itself. The first was Kata Containers. Making Zuul a standalone effort therefore advance’s the Foundation’s ambition to become a bit like the Linux and Apache Foundations, by nurturing multiple open source projects.
  • OpenStack spins out its Zuul open source CI/CD platform
    There are few open-source projects as complex as OpenStack, which essentially provides large companies with all the tools to run the equivalent of the core AWS services in their own data centers. To build OpenStack’s various systems the team also had to develop some of its own DevOps tools, and, in 2012, that meant developing Zuul, an open-source continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) platform. Now, with the release of Zuul v3, the team decided to decouple Zuul from OpenStack and run it as an independent project. It’s not quite leaving the OpenStack ecosystem, though, as it will still be hosted by the OpenStack Foundation.
  • Nextcloud 13: How to Get Started and Why You Should
    In its simplest form, the Nextcloud server is "just" a personal, free software alternative to services like Dropbox or iCloud. You can set it up so your files are always accessible via the internet, from wherever you are, and share them with your friends. However, Nextcloud can do so much more. In this article, I first describe what the Nextcloud server is and how to install and set it up on GNU/Linux systems. Then I explain how to configure the optional Nextcloud features, which may be the first steps toward making Nextcloud the shell of a complete replacement for many proprietary platforms existing today, such as Dropbox, Facebook and Skype.
  • Why use Puppet for automation and orchestration
    Puppet the company bills Puppet the automation tool as the de facto standard for automating the delivery and ongoing operation of hybrid infrastructure. That was certainly true at one time: Puppet not only goes back to 2005, but also currently claims 40,000 organizations worldwide as users, including 75 percent of the Fortune 100. While Puppet is still a very strong product and has increased its speed and capabilities over the years, its competitors, in particular Chef, have narrowed the gap. As you might expect from the doyenne of the IT automation space, Puppet has a very large collection of modules, and covers the gamut from CI/CD to cloud-native infrastructure, though much of that functionality is provided through additional products. While Puppet is primarily a model-based system with agents, it supports push operations with Puppet Tasks. Puppet Enterprise is even available as a service on Amazon.

today's howtos

Oregan unveils new middleware for Linux STBs and Android TV

Oregan Networks, a provider of digital TV software services, has announced the launch of a new set-top box client middleware product for pay-TV operators called SparQ. The software is designed to work on the most challenging and resource-limited STB platforms in the field, making it feasible to introduce new OTT content services and applications on customer devices that were deployed as part of the first wave of IPTV and hybrid broadcast deployments. Read more

KDE Development Updates

  • Revisiting my talk at FOSSASIA summit, 2018
    Earlier this year, I had the chance to speak about one of KDE community’s cool projects that is helpding developers erase the line between desktop and mobile/tablet UI’s with ease. I’m referring to the Kirigami UI framework – a set of QtQuick components targetted at the mobile as well as desktop platforms. This is particularly important to KDE and a lot of projects are now migrating towards a Kirigami UI, particularly keeping in mind the ability to run the applications on the Plasma Mobile.
  • This Week in KDE, Part 2 : OYLG, Workspace KCM, Single/Double Click
    Last weekend, I went to İstanbul to attend Özgür Yazılım ve Linux Günleri (Free Software and Linux Days 2018) to represent LibreOffice. We had 3 presentations during the event about LibreOffice Development and The Open Document Format. We had booth setup with stickers, flyers, roll-up etc. These were all thanks to The Document Foundation’s supports! You can find detailed information about the event from here : https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Events/2018/OYLG2018
  • Watching the Detectives
    For instance, Kevin Ottens has been writing about understanding the KDE community by the “green blobs” method, showing who is active when. Lays Rodrigues has written about using Gource to show Plasma growing up. Nate Graham describes the goings-on in the KDE community nearly every week. Those are, roughly: a metric-, a visual-, and a story-based approach to understanding the community, over different timescales. But understanding of a system doesn’t come from a single dimension, from a single axis of measurement. It comes from mixing up the different views to look the system as a whole.
  • Managing cooking recipes
    I like to cook. And sometimes store my recipes. Over the years I have tried KRecipes, kept my recipes in BasKet notes, in KJots notes, in more or less random word processor documents. I liked the free form entering recipes in various notes applications and word processor documents, but I lacked some kind of indexing them. What I wanted was free-ish text for writing recipes, and some thing that could help me find them by tags I give them. By Title. By how I organize them. And maybe by Ingredient if I don’t know how to get rid of the soon-to-be-bad in my refridgerator.