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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linus Fed Up with FSF

Filed under
OSS

LKML: I'm damn fed up with the FSF being the "protector of freedoms", and also feeling that they can define what those freedoms mean. The GPLv2 is a *legal*license*. And no, the FSF doesn't get to define what the words mean to suit their agenda.

Protect Your Stuff With Encrypted Linux Partitions

Filed under
HowTos

enterprisenetworkingplanet: We see the headlines all the time: "Company X Loses 30,000,000 Customer Social Security Numbers and Other Intimately Personal and Financial Data! Haha, Boy Are Our Faces Red!" How come they never quite know what data is missing, and if it was encrypted or protected in any way?

First look at Fedora Core 7: installer problems abound

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

apcmag: It was with much anticipation that we nabbed the new Fedora Core 7 Live CD in the hope of checking it out first before installing it. Unfortunately, the live CD had other plans.

Is Open Source complacent?

Filed under
OSS

ITtoolbox Blogs: As you probably have heard or read about by now Microsoft has made another deal with another open source company. This time Linspire has signed a deal with Microsoft to license VOIP and Windows proprietary media formats and true type fonts. My question is why?

Getting started with GRUB

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: When you power on your computer, the first software that runs is a bootloader that invokes the computer's operating system. GRUB, the GRand Unified Bootloader, is an integral part of many Linux systems. It starts the Linux kernel. Here's some background on GRUB, and some tips on installing and configuring the software.

Linspire, Microsoft in Linux-related, Patent-Protection deal

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linspire Inc. on June 14 will announce an agreement to license VoIP, Windows Media, and TrueType font technology from Microsoft for use in its Linux distribution. Additionally, the deal includes protection for Linspire customers against possible violations of Microsoft patents by Linux, and other cooperative measures.

Say goodbye to the Internet you knew

Filed under
Web

Rudd-O: Because your kids won’t ever know it. Don’t believe me? Here are the two major turning points, all in one week’s news:

Curbing My Enthusiasm for QuickBooks on Linux

Filed under
Software

eWeek blogs: As my colleague Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols is reporting, Intuit is opting to get a bit cozier with Linux. It's an eye-catching announcement, considering that lukewarm Linux support from Windows-centric application vendors like Intuit remains one of the biggest strikes against the open-source operating system as a mainstream desktop platform.

Mandriva revamps its eTraining website

Filed under
MDV

desktoplinux: Mandriva announced this week that it has revamped its eTraining website interface for better ease of use. In addition, the free online management modules have been improved, and there are two new free courses: one on urpmi and rpmdrake, and the other on Mandriva Flash.

Torvalds-Schwartz Brouhaha

Filed under
OSS
  • Torvalds slams Sun over Linux intentions

  • Open-source Solaris makes GPL 3 more attractive: Linus Torvalds
  • Linus' Take On Sun, OpenSolaris, and GPL v3
  • Schwartz to Torvalds: Dinner at my place?

Yay for yum and yumex!

Filed under
Software

Just Another Tech Blog: I believe my bias against RPM is beginning to leave me, and I am beginning to see that RPM is a very viable package management system. The reason for this sudden support of RPM is yum. Yum is awesome. I could leave it at that... or continue.

Paging Michael Dell: Where’s My Order?

Filed under
Ubuntu

allaboutubuntu: I ordered my Dell PC with Ubuntu Linux on May 27. Dell.com informed me that the system would ship somewhere around June 12. Quite a long wait, but I was willing to sit tight. Now, the problem:

Interesting Interviews:

  • Interview with Brian Aker

  • Interview with Havoc Pennington

Feed your content cravings with Liferea

linux.com: find myself not browsing the Web as much as I used to, thanks to Liferea, a Linux-based aggregator for online news feeds. A news aggregator eliminates the need for surfing the Web as much. Instead of going to all the Web pages you have bookmarked to read your favorite blogs, news, or media presentations, you can simply add an RSS/RDF or Atom syndication format to Liferea and have all the news feeds at your command.

Open source: New target of malware?

Filed under
Security

ZDNet: The recent OpenOffice worm may be a sign that malware writers are starting to target the increasingly popular open-source software, industry experts say.

Gnash, the open source Flash project, releases support for YouTube

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: I missed that the Gnash team had started a blog, but in going through my feeds I discovered it and found out that they’ve recently added support for viewing YouTube videos. Gnash is an open source project that aims to provide the functionality of the Flash Player.

Safari on Linux

Filed under
Software

pimp your linux: Monday at the WWDC Steve Jobs announced that Safari would be ported to Windows. Many people in the audience found this more shocking than the new features offered in the leopard operating system. The reasons behind the port still remain unclear. Does Safari work for Linux?

Intuit's QuickBooks Enterprise Solutions Embraces Linux

Filed under
Software

LWN: The press release is thin on technical details and there is no mention of client-side Linux support, but Intuit is, perhaps for the first time, actually admitting that Linux shops exist. It appears they are offering a way to store the database for their mid-range QuickBooks on Linux servers.

Setting up a Freebsd Multimedia Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

Raiden's Realm: Of all the many wonderful and free operating systems out there, few can begin to meet or surpass the quality, stability, and structured operation of FreeBSD. That’s why I like it so much and have used it for years. But out of the box, FreeBSD is and always will be a server OS. In this tutorial I plan to show you how to set up your own Freebsd desktop from scratch.

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today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • Java and Python FTP attacks can punch holes through firewalls
    The Java and Python runtimes fail to properly validate FTP URLs, which can potentially allow attackers to punch holes through firewalls to access local networks. On Saturday, security researcher Alexander Klink disclosed an interesting attack where exploiting an XXE (XML External Entity) vulnerability in a Java application can be used to send emails.
  • Microsoft: no plans to patch known bugs before March [Ed: Microsoft is keeping open 'back doors' that are publicly known about, not just secret ones]
    Microsoft has no plans to issue updates for two vulnerabilities, one a zero-day and the other being one publicised by Google, before the scheduled date for its next round of updates rolls around in March. The company did not issue any updates in February, even though it had been scheduled to switch to a new system from this month onwards. It gave no reason for this, apart from saying: "This month, we discovered a last minute issue that could impact some customers and was not resolved in time for our planned updates today. "After considering all options, we made the decision to delay this month’s updates. We apologise for any inconvenience caused by this change to the existing plan." The Google-disclosed bug was made public last week, and is said to be a flaw in the Windows graphic device interface library that can be exploited both locally and remotely to read the contents of a user's memory.
  • Microsoft issues critical security patches, but leaves zero-day flaws at risk
    Microsoft has patched "critical" security vulnerabilities in its browsers, but has left at least two zero-day flaws with public exploit code. The software giant released numerous patches late on Tuesday to fix flaws in Adobe Flash for customers using Internet Explorer on Windows 8.1 and later, as well as Edge for Windows 10.

Red Hat News

  • Why upstream contributions matter when developing open source NFV solutions.
    When software is developed using open source methods, an upstream repository of the code is accessible to all members of the project. Members contribute to the code, test it, write documentation and can create a solution from that code to use or distribute under license. If an organization follows the main stream or branch of the upstream code their solution will receive all the changes and updates created in the upstream repository. Those changes simply “flow down” to the member’s solution. However, if a member organization forks the code — if they create a solution that strays from the main stream — their solution no longer receives updates, fixes and changes from the upstream repository. This organization is now solely responsible for maintaining their solution without the benefit of the upstream community, much like the baby salmon that took a tributary and then have to fend for themselves rather than remain in the main stream and receive the benefit and guidance of the other salmon making their way to the ocean.
  • HPE and Red Hat Join Forces to Give Customers Greater Choice for NFV Deployments
    Hewlett Packard Enterprise ( NYSE : HPE ) and Red Hat, Inc. ( NYSE : RHT ) announced today they are working together to accelerate the deployment of network functions virtualization (NFV) solutions based on fully open, production-ready, standards-based infrastructures. HPE plans to offer ready-to-use, pre-integrated HPE NFV System solutions and HPE Validated Configurations incorporating Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage for communications service providers (CSPs).
  • Red Hat Joins the OpenPower Foundation
    As part of our commitment to delivering open technologies across many computing architectures, Red Hat has joined the OpenPOWER Foundation, an open development community based on the POWER microprocessor architecture, at the Platinum level. While we already do build and support open technologies for the POWER architecture, the OpenPOWER Foundation is committed to an open, community-driven technology-creation process – something that we feel is critical to the continued growth of open collaboration around POWER.
  • Buy, Sell or Hold? Analysts Approach: HCA Holdings, Inc. (HCA), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

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