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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fault-tolerant Web hosting on a shoestring

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HowTos

Linux.com: The words "fault-tolerant Web hosting" bring to mind hosting centers with multiple redundant power supplies, complex networking, and big bills. However, by taking advantage of the underlying fault-tolerance of the Internet, you can get a surprising level of reliability for little cost.

Edubuntu update - it freakin’ rocks

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Ubuntu

ZDNet: So after my last Edubuntu debacle (With Feisty Fawn comes a new Edubuntu) I decided to wait until I could devote a bit of time to a proper install.

Set Gmail as Default Mail Client in Ubuntu

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HowTos

how-to-geek: Every Geek uses Gmail… it’s pretty much required. And now you can set Gmail as the default client in Ubuntu without any extra software.

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva 2007 Spring Free (Mandriva 2007.1)

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MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva 2007 Spring Free (Mandriva 2007.1) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

GPL likely to regain Apache compatibility

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OSS

CNET: In a significant change of course, the Free Software Foundation is working to make the upcoming version 3 of the General Public License (GPL) compatible with an alternative, the Apache License.

McNealy Says Sun Evaluating OpenSolaris On GPL

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OS

LinuxWorld (IDG): Sun Microsystems is evaluating whether it should release OpenSolaris under the GNU GPL (general public license), company co-founder and chairman, Scott McNealy told reporters in Bangalore on a conference call Wednesday.

United We Stand, Divided They Linux

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Linux

sKatterBrainZ World: The recent merger news of OSDL and FSG (not to be confused with MSG), as reported by InformationWeek, doesn’t ring my bell. Why? Because almost every Linux nut I know (and I know quite a few) doesn’t care about consistency across distributions.

Ye Olde Linux Desktop

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Linux

Red Hat Mag: So Dell decided to ship Ubuntu on the desktop. Doesn’t that bother you guys at all? Let Ubuntu take the lead in building the better horse. They’ve earned that lead, and good on them.

GlassFish shows open source at its best

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Interviews

ComputerWorld (IDG): GlassFish is the first project to spring from Sun Microsystem's decision to open source its Java programming code and Ken Drachnik, one of its chief evangelists, points to the project as a lesson in how open source spurs innovation.

Kubuntu Takes Over Georgia; Ubuntu Summit Video

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Ubuntu

kdedevelopers: Georgia is rolling out Kubuntu in all their schools. This is being done as part of a project to bring the internet to every school in Georgia. I don't have many details yet but it should become a Canonical case study soon enough.

Fix "Password required" Error When Using Unrar in Ubuntu

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HowTos

the how-to-geek: If you’ve tried to use the built-in “Extract Here” functionality in Ubuntu’s File Roller to extract either a single or a multi-part zip or rar file and ended up with a “Password required” error, then you might just assume the files are password protected when in fact they are not.

DC Parris of LXer to Linux community member: shut up!

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Linux

Penguin Pete's: I saw this LXer thread (on Tux500) yesterday, and decided not to comment. Then I thought about it again last night, but decided not to blog it. Then I had a hard night sleeping, and this morning it popped up again. What was bothering me? Oh, yes, my conscience.

A Pig(Snort), A Moon (Lua) and one very happy developer (Bill)

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HowTos

Linux Security: About one month ago, Snort 3.0 Alpha was released for testing in the community. If you want to be on the cutting edge of intrusion detection, packet sniffing, and keeping your system safe, check out this introduction to preparing for the future of intrusion detection.

Enchanting Pictures with ImageMagick

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HowTos

polishlinux: Since digital still cameras hit mainstream, we’ve all become flooded with hundreds of photos. Luckily there are some free magicians available, who can answer our call for help and automate all processes causing them take minutes instead of days.

Also: Managing Photos on your Desktop Linux Installation

Gentoo's Graphical Installer is Unnecessary

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Gentoo

daniweb: Gentoo has long been a distribution aimed towards the power Linux user. With this year's first Gentoo release, 2007.0, comes an updated LiveCD featuring a completely rewritten GTK+ based installer. The bigger question is, why provide a GTK+ based installer in the first place?

Also: Ubuntu User on Installing Gentoo

KDE tip - taking screenshots

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HowTos

FOSSwire: In GNOME, it’s really easy to take a screenshot of your system, you just hit Print Screen and a handy window pops up where you can save it. For some reason, this functionality doesn’t work with KDE out of the box, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take screenshots.

Microsoft is not the boss, we are

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Linux
Microsoft

libervis.com: After celebrations over Dell announcing that it will soon be selling GNU/Linux Ubuntu desktops and laptops we are seeing a bit of an uproar after, just a week later, Microsoft announced it's partnership with Dell akin to the one it made with Novell last November.

A Day Without Open Source

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OSS

bmc blogs: I was at a conference when two techies walked into the open bar, one an open source supporter and one staunchly anti. They got into it a bit after a few drinks, and Mr. Anti commented loudly, “I wish open source would just go away! It causes more trouble than it's worth.”

Why Is Dell Buying SLES certificates from Microsoft, Not Novell?

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Microsoft
SUSE

Groklaw: According to sources, Dell will be selling SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) certificates, which it will obtain from Microsoft. As part of the Novell/Microsoft deal, Microsoft received 75,000 SLES licenses. From Microsoft? The Direct2Dell blog confirms that indeed Dell will buy the certificates from Microsoft, not from Novell. Why? Why not directly from Novell?

How secure are Linux, Window and Mac OS?

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Security

Masuran.org: How secure is your favorite operating system? In a time where OS fanatics battle each other on what OS is the best, security is often one of the turning points of discussion. In this article I will be comparing the vulnerabilities listed on Secunia and assessing how serious they are.

Also: What about Linux spyware?

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India