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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Formatting cells in OpenOffice.org Calc

I've seen spreadsheets that are basically interactive tutorials, and many more loaded with what Edward Tufte refers to as "chartjunk" -- embellishments that do nothing to make the presentation of information more effective. Yet, generally, spreadsheets are treated pragmatically. Certainly, few people worry about their layout than the layout of text documents. Still, even if you share this attitude, learning the basic formatting options for cells in OpenOffice.org Calc can be worth your time.

Review of Project Looking Glass on Ubuntu

Filed under
Reviews

I finally got some time to write about Sun’s Project Looking Glass. You might have read my earlier article about installing Project Looking Glass on Ubuntu. Once installed, it creates an option in the login window as a session.

French space agency to publish UFO archive online

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The French space agency is to publish its archive of UFO sightings and other phenomena online, but will keep the names of those who reported them off the site to protect them from pestering by space fanatics.

My First 12 Hours On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I want to write about my first 12 hours on Ubuntu Linux. I’m not what you might consider a “power user.” I don’t run my own server, I’m not at all good with running command lines or terminals. I grew up Windows, I know Windows and switching to Linux has pushed my brain farther than I thought it would ever have to go. It has been a great experience. Here are some things that I’ve noted are significantly different and, in my humble opinion better, than Windows.

Rotating the compiz cube using a Wiimote

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MDV

Today, David has brought his Wiimote at Mandriva office so that we make some experiments with the Wiimote linux drivers. I've started with WMD, which is a python program that can generate input events based on the info sent by the Wiimote (on Bluetooth).

Another lost year for linux?

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Linux

Ever since Linux came out of the shadow and made the front cover in most computing magazines as the next big thing all of it’s fans wait for the day that it’s market share will grow and “eat” Microsoft windows.

Linux: Data Corruption Bug Fixed

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Linux

After several days of effort, Linus Torvalds tracked down and posted a patch for a low level data corruption bug. In a series of emails, Linus thoroughly explained the thought process involved in isolating the exact problem. Linus posted the fix in a followup email.

Linux is Workable on Zune?

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Linux

The latest reports say that a dude who goes under the name, "MysVidel" has managed to get the Linux operating system up and alive on Microsoft's Zune.

Philippine smes Unaware how to Benefit from Open Source Technology

Filed under
OSS

Open Source software (OSS) may be gaining popularity in the Philippines, but many small business owners are still unaware of how this technology can impact and improve their businesses.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Running Internet Explorer in Ubuntu Linux

  • Tweaking grub settings : Ubuntu
  • Invalidating the Linux buffer cache
  • Recursively lists package dependencies Using apt-rdepends
  • SQL: Tips
  • Working with Your UNIX Shell

Kerberos authentication for AIX Version 5.3

Filed under
Linux

Find out how to use application programming interfaces (APIs) when writing your own custom Kerberos-based authentication applications. In this article, you'll examine different Kerberos credential cache name formats that AIX NFS V4 supports and are required for authentication purposes. You'll also look at different methods of obtaining the Kerberos credential.

Ubuntu: 32-bit v. 64-bit Performance

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Ubuntu

While 64-bit support is now considered common for both Intel and AMD processors, many Linux (as well as Windows) users are uncertain whether to use a 32-bit or 64-bit operating system with there being advantages for both paths. In this article, we will be comparing the i386 and x86_64 performance with Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft and Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 1 to see how the numbers truly stack up.

Seven Things to do with a Free Vista laptop...

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Humor

Seems many bloggers woke up this morning to find Microsoft has left a laptop in their stocking. There is a minor hullabaloo rippling through Blogistan about it. Amongst others, Joel Spolsky of "Joel on Software" got one. This time, I'm not even linking to the original story; if you haven't heard about it by now, you don't care anyway.

Gmail problem limited, Google says

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Google

A problem with Google Inc.'s free e-mail service that has users increasingly reporting that their data and accounts are being irretrievably deleted is an isolated one, the internet search giant says.

2006: The year the FSF reached out to the community

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OSS

At the start of 2006, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was largely inward-looking, focused on the GNU Project and high-level strategic concerns such as licensing. Now, without abandoning these issues, the FSF had transformed into an openly activist organization, reaching out to its supporters and encouraging their participation in civic campaigns often designed to enlist non-hackers in their causes. Yet what happened seems to bemuse even FSF employees.

Suse 10.2, part 4: KDE's Konqueror

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SUSE

I've grown to really like KDE. Working with KDE is, in a word, fun. Yes, fun. Enjoyable. A pleasure to work with. Easy to approach. Provides pleasant surprises and wonderful answers to problems I never new I really had. That's why I keep posting about Suse and KDE, especially this release.

Linux is the Future

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Interviews

Mark Shuttleworth gave an interview to Ukrainian online journal ‘Computer Review’ (Kompyuternoye Obozreniye), where he shared his thoughts about his life, Ubuntu, Space, Open source, Linux, Microsfot-Novell deal and other interesting things.

CIO study finds Linux ready for prime-time

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Linux

Nearly half of all enterprises will be running mission-critical business applications on Linux in five years' time. That's according to survey of IT directors, VPs and CIOs carried out by Saugatuck Research, which questioned 133 businesses worldwide.

Firefox man loses faith in Google

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Google
Moz/FF

BLAKE ROSS, one of the key people behind the Firefox browser, says that he is losing faith in the antics of the search engine Google.

Right-Click to Launch Custom Scripts with Nautilus

Filed under
HowTos

You might remember my previous post about how to actually use the Create Document option on your desktops right-click menu. Today I’ll go over how to create custom scripts to launch from that same panel. This can go for any frequently used program, custom scripts that you’ve written, etc. This tutorial is rated E for everyone!

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