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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Blender is amazing srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 10:56pm
Story openSUSE 12.1 KDE3 LiveCD srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 10:50pm
Story New Linux Game 'Metagolf' srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 10:46pm
Story Ubuntu on the move more than in decline srlinuxx 2 03/12/2011 - 10:29pm
Story Chrome usage almost at that of Firefox srlinuxx 2 03/12/2011 - 10:24pm
Story DWP Confirms 1,000 Open Source Desktops Pilot srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 7:30pm
Story 5 Online Backup Solutions for Ubuntu srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 7:28pm
Story Linux Mint 12 MATE Review srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 7:27pm
Story GNOME 3 Gets New Extension Website srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 3:58am
Story Introducing - Towns srlinuxx 03/12/2011 - 3:55am

Affinity - GNOME desktop search tool

Filed under
Software

Affinity is a front end desktop search tool that uses Beagle or Tracker as backend desktop search engine. Some of the current features in Affinity are:

* Front-end to both the Beagle & Tracker desktop search engines.
* Has actions (configurable through Desktop files), which speeds up common tasks.

Learning GIMP - Part 1

Filed under
Software

GIMP a.k.a. GNU Image Manipulation Program is a 100% free software created to view and edit almost all image formats out there. Not only that it is the best FREE photo editor, it is also compatible with many operating systems like Linux, Windows or Mac OS X and translated into many languages.

Become a digital video editing guru using Linux tools

Filed under
HowTos

Shooting, editing, and producing video clips has been my passion for about 10 years. As a free software adept, I always tried to perform this process on Linux. This year I have finally found a set of tools that work for me. This article provides a brief tutorial on home video production.

Slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISOs released

Filed under
SUSE

today we are releasing slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISO images. The reason for putting out those updated ISOs is a license issue, which had to be addressed. The following ISOs have be replaced on the mirrors:

* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-BiArch.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-ppc.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-i386.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-ppc.iso

Installing OpenSSL Support for Ruby on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

The more I work with Ubuntu, the more I think it’s a very good desktop, but not a good development machine. For instance, you can install Ruby 1.8.4 from the package management system, but not 1.8.5 (or 1.8.6 which is now the latest). So you’re stuck compiling ruby on your own.

Red Hat insists rivals not gaining

Filed under
Linux

Responding to ZDNet Asia's query Thursday during the launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and Exchange, Scott H. Crenshaw, the company's vice president of enterprise Linux platform business, said: "I've seen no data to suggest that we're losing market share." Crenshaw added that Novell's revenues from its Linux products are nothing to shout about.

A clear case for operating system harmony

Filed under
SUSE

There was scepticism last year when arch-rivals Microsoft and Novell signed an alliance which would see Microsoft sell and support Linux systems.

Some argued that it was a ploy by Microsoft to convert Linux users to Windows. Now two of the world's largest organisations - Wal-Mart and HSBC - have signed up to Microsoft's Linux.

How do I... Configure TightVNC for remote access?

Filed under
HowTos

Numerous remote administration and connectivity tools exist to help support technicians and IT administrators troubleshoot, maintain, and access systems in different locations. Some are easy to use and require no firewall configuration. Others possess expensive and potentially prohibitive licensing requirements, while delivering more advanced functionality.

How to create a command-line password locker

Filed under
HowTos

Like many people, I have too many passwords to remember. To keep them straight, I wrote a simple password locker script using dialog and GnuPG (GNU Privacy Guard). The script prompts the user for a master password using a dialog box, unencrypts a file that holds a list of passwords, and opens the file in a text editor. When the editor is closed, the script re-encrypts the password file.

Howto install & use Flash, Java, Real Player 32 bit plugins under 64 bit Firefox

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I found nspluginwrapper which allows to use 32bit plugins on a 64bit Firefox browser using nspluginwrapper. It is an Open Source compatibility plugin for Netscape 4 (NPAPI) plugins. That is, it enables you to use plugins on platforms they were not built for.

For example, you can following plugin on Linux/x86_64 , NetBSD and FreeBSD platforms:
=> Acrobat Reader (v5.0.9, v7.0.1)

Gnome GDM Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

It is possible to launch GDM, Gnome's Desktop Manager, automatically at startup so that you don't have to type startx all the time. Assuming you already have Gnome installed on your system, you just have to open as root /etc/inittab, and add the following line at the end of the file:

In Search Of GPL Version 3: The Long Road To Nowhere

Filed under
OSS

A month ago, I started down a path that I hoped would lead me to a great prize: an explanation from the authors of how the General Public License Version 3.0 was shaping up. Little did I know that this journey would contain more curves than San Francisco's Lombard Street.

Free Software Versus Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

The terms "Free Software" and "Open Source Software" are often used interchangeably, and even abbreviated together as F/OSS (for "Free/Open Source Software"). Are there any differences between the two? If so, what are those differences? If not, why do the two different names exist? David Chisnall examines this paradox.

The Birth of Free Software

Using RADIUS to authenticate users with RSA SecurID

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I was tasked with authenticating users who carry RSA SecurID tokens. I was highly inspired by Jeff Wirth and his success using RADIUS to authenticate with SecurID Tokens on FreeBSD. While I'm not a fan of non-free software, it's possible to make each server authenticate against the non-free RSA Ace server using only free software.

The Visual History of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

While Debian has been around for over a decade, Gentoo for five years, and Mandriva/Mandrake for nearly nine years, in less than three years of existence Ubuntu has received the most attention and generated the greatest amount of publicity in the Linux limelight. Why is that?

Top five PC manufacturers fail naked PC test

Filed under
Hardware

IT professionals are being forced to adopt Microsoft's operating systems — even if they tell their PC supplier they want a system free of Microsoft software, ZDNet UK's research has revealed.

Why Linux Mint?

Filed under
Ubuntu

I received an interesting email the other day that I wanted to share with you:

Hi, Matt
Here’s another tip-of-the-cap for Linux Mint, as compared to my Ubuntu distro.

Science stars trace a long handwritten journey

Filed under
Software

Alan Pierce stands next to a computer in a darkened classroom and traces "h-e-l-l-o" on a small computer's touch-sensitive data entry screen.

Instantly, "hello" appears in typewritten text, projected on a 5-by-8-foot wall screen behind him, below the likeness of his handwritten greeting.

Canonical Ltd Launches Global Partner Programme for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, today announced its newly created Partner Programme to drive awareness and adoption of business-ready, Open Source server platforms, and desktop solutions.

Backing Up with Keep

Filed under
HowTos

Keep is the second entry in my Backing Up series. It is a lightweight app that makes it simple to create and manage multiple backups. At first glance Keep's feature set looks very solid, but when trying it out I quickly discovered some limitations that really limit its potential.

I tested with version 0.3.0 and 0.4.0 on Kubuntu Edgy and 0.4.0 on Debian Etch.

Appearance and Useability

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.