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Monday, 24 Jul 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 1:47pm
Story The quest for the perfect Twitter client on Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:55am
Story A Nicely-Built 40-Core Raspberry Pi Cluster Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:38am
Story Classic Desktops, KDE Changes, and Photoshop Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:37am
Story Usability and Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:29am
Story Dear Adobe: Make Software for Linux Too Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:16am
Story Sony Xperia Z2 tablet specs leaked Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 8:05am
Story Evolve OS - an Upcoming Linux Distribution Featuring a New Desktop Environment Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 12:07am
Story New SliTaz GNU/Linux 5.0 Cooking Release Features Linux Kernel 3.2.53 Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 12:01am
Story HowTo watch TV on your Linux pc Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 11:54pm

Nine Features Included in Fedora 9

Filed under
Linux

softpedia: Although Fedora 8 just got released, the developers are thinking about the features which are going to be included in the next release, Fedora 9. There are no approved features yet, but the community is working on providing material for developers to choose from.

DSL 4.0: Damn small improvement

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Damn Small Linux is tiny Linux distribution that John Andrews originally created in 2002 to see just how many applications could fit into a 50MB system. The project has grown over the years to include many other contributors working on hundreds of packages and applications. Last month's release of DSL 4.0 brought many updates and changes, yet it remains a special-purpose distribution for older hardware because it lacks support for many modern features.

Mesh networks on OLPC: it's all about the application level

Filed under
OLPC

o'reilly onlamp: I went down to the Cambridge, Massachusetts lab of One Laptop Per Child today to find out what they’re doing with mesh networks. A One Laptop Per Child system has limited value on its own. Its most innovative and powerful features lie in its participation in a mesh network with other laptops. So get your neighbors and workmates to buy them too!

Ubuntu Server: Considering Kernel Configuration

Filed under
HowTos

Carla Schroder: Last week we looked at Ubuntu Server's documentation, discussed hardware requirements, tried to figure out what sets Ubuntu Server apart from Ubuntu Desktop. We're taking such a deep dive into the very bowels of Ubuntu Server that this is expanding into a three-parter, so hold on to your hats and enjoy the ride.

Popular Mechanics Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

popularmechanics.com: To give a little something to the rest of our geeky readers out there, we’re also posting its operating system on the Popular Mechanics Web site for free. We received permission from Ubuntu to dress up the OS with a Popular Mechanics skin and post it on our site.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Installation of openSUSE 10.3 (10.2 to 10.3 upgrade)

  • the ubuntu project
  • Interesting Changes For GNOME 2.21.2
  • How a bread truck invented the internet
  • Ars on Ubuntu Gutsy
  • How to set up your own Debian Linux Mirror
  • How Do Penguins Build Their Nests?
  • Yahoo to launch open source program
  • Linux: Scheduler Fixes
  • Debian Ubuntu - Webcam in Yahoo! Chatrooms
  • Ubuntu: Last nail in the coffin
  • Put a puppy in your PC Part 1
  • Does Ubuntu Need a New Flavor Aimed At Developers?
  • Mozilla to make Firefox memory issues a priority

The disconnect between Open Source advocates and the rest of the world

Filed under
OSS

geekzone.co.nz: A recent thread in our Geekzone discussion forums illustrated a couple of interesting points about the way Linux proponents talk about their favourite OS and about the way other (non-Linux) users tend to react to this. This is about perception and also about an apparent disconnect between those two user groups.

How to gear up your desktop for the Christmas holidays

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com/blogs: I just saw my first Christmas lights a few days ago. Do you know what that means? It brings a very special time: decorating your GNU/Linux-based PC.

Also: Desktop delights for digitally delicious wallpapers

XO laptop sales begin, but support plan is nonexistent

Filed under
OLPC

Richard Koman: Today the effort moved to the world of consumer sales and philanthropy, as OLPC’s Give 1, Get 1 program launched. And it appears that by the end of day the website was saying there were only 12 days left in the sale. That’s confusing because OLPC has said there will be no limit.

First Look at Prism

Filed under
Software

linuxmovement: So a little while ago I made my first webrunner app. Webrunner was a program used to bring web applications to the desktop. It was very confusing and not all that easy for the average user. Recently Webrunner has now become Prism. The initila code for Prism is being taken from webrunner. So I decide to use webrunner again and noticed they update the code a bit, and now the files are actually called Prism and its extremely easy to use.

Skype 2.0 beta for Linux adds video chat, works with webcam on Asus Eee PC

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Skype has released a new beta version for Linux that finally adds long-awaited support for video chat, the single most requested feature for Skype on Linux. The Skype 2.0 beta, which is available for download from Skype's web site, includes a number of other minor feature improvements in addition to the new video functionality.

Fedora 8 sees strong adoption in first week

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica: The latest version of Fedora—codenamed Werewolf—was released last week. According to statistics released this morning by Red Hat, Fedora 8 has been already been installed over 54,000 times in only four days.

PDF Viewers for Linux Compared

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: PDF documents are at present the most popular form of distributing documents throughout the Internet and a presentation tool at the same time. They owe their popularity not only to well defined standard embracing text, pictures and hyperlinks, but foremost to the fact that once created they can be read under nearly every operating system and its underlying platform. Of course, to open a PDF document one has to have an appropriate application.

10 Reasons Why You Need to Download Ubuntu Right Now

Filed under
Ubuntu

softwarebattle.com: I’ve been using Ubuntu for some time now, and it’s really grown on me. At first, I booted into Vista more often than not, but since the release of 7.10, I’ve noticed a lot of major changes–most of them for the better.

Linux still dominates the HPC arena

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techtarget.com: For some time now Linux has been the dominate operating system in high performance computing. For everything from IBM, with its rockstar status supercomputer Blue Gene, to NEC or U.S. HPC players SGI and HP–the bulk of the leading HPC clusters today are Linux-based.

Google Android Screenshots & Video

Filed under
Google

cybernetnews: As expected Google released their Android Software Development Kit (SDK) today. It provides all of the tools needed to start creating applications that run on the next generation mobile operating system, and Google is getting their checkbooks out to help ensure that Android won’t be a flop…

ubuntu vs opensuse

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu
-s

I was glancing through the top searches for my site and noticed one string I thought I'd try to answer it. That search was openSUSE vs Ubuntu. Now, I've avoided formally comparing Ubuntu to other distros such as openSUSE or Mandriva before because in my book it's like comparing apples to oranges, but for the sake of those searching, I will try.

1 Year Later, Just the Facts

Filed under
SUSE

opseast.wordpress: It’s been a whole year since the ground-breaking Novell-Microsoft Collaboration Agreement was signed and announced. Despite the noise in the press, MANY customers have decided to take advantage of the many benefits that the agreement brings to the table. Here’s a list of all 46 of the customers.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Burning CD and DVD ISO images with cdrecord

  • How-to Enable Anti-Aliasing in Quake Wars Linux
  • Check the bash shell script is being run by root or not
  • Using the AutoFilter: A useful if slightly twitchy tool
  • Create an OpenOffice.org extension the easy way with BasicAddonBuilder
  • Fix for Limewire blank beryl problem
  • How can I configure winbind to synchronize user and group IDs across multiple Red Hat Enterprise Linux hosts on Active Directory accounts?

Playing around with KWin 4

Filed under
KDE

smspillaz.wordpress: So, being bored as I usually am, I decided to fix my installation of KDE 4 and try out KWin 4 with Composite bling. Unfortunately, after beta 2, it appeared that openGL based desktop Compositing broke for most people but I managed to get XRender output working.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE's Plasma 5.10.4 in Chakra GNU/Linux

15 ways to empower students with open source tools

Recently I read the fascinating book Empower: What Happens When Students Own Their Own Learning, by John Spencer and A.J. Juliani. The book led me to think more deeply about my teaching methods and how I like to learn. I think learning should be exciting, and I'm happiest when I'm actively engaged in what I'm doing. Why wouldn't students in our schools want anything different than that? And why aren't we doing more to give that experience to them? While many schools today have a 1:1 ratio of computers/tablets to students, most of them use platforms and software that allow little (if any) modification. Students can't tinker with the software or hardware. Yet tinkering and experimenting are at the heart of learning. The authors of Empower say that students in environments that foster "making" take ownership of their learning more readily and tend to be deeper thinkers who are more at home with frustration. Ultimately, they wrote, "makers are better equipped for life." Read more

Red Hat Upgrade and Insider Selling

OSS: Yandex, The Open Source Way, Machine Learning, and BSD

  • In Other API Economy News: Yandex Open Source Machine Learning Library and More
    We start your weekend off with a review of the stories we couldn’t cover with a look at what what going on in the world of APIs. We start off with news that Yandex, the Russian search engine company, has announced that they are open-sourcing CatBoost, a machine learning library. The library is based on gradient boosting, a machine learning technique described by TechCrunch as being “designed to help “teach” systems when you have a very sparse amount of data, and especially when the data may not all be sensorial (such as audio, text or imagery), but includes transactional or historical data, too.” Yandex is freely releasing CatBoost for anyone to use under an Apache License. This move is similar to what we saw from Google when they open sourced TensorFlow in late 2015. As the demand for artificial intelligence solutions backed by machine learning platforms continues to grow, moves like this serve to help a wide range of developers take advantage of the technology.
  • CatBoost: Yandex's machine learning algorithm is available free of charge
  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community. Additionally, as organizations, especially government, continue to emerge from the technology funding embargo of the Great (2008) Recession - an economic force that froze IT purchases and programs and forced many into strict “keep the lights on” operational mode, IT managers and CIO’s are carefully expending their still relatively measly budgets. [...] For IT organizations, especially government, with limited budgets and long procurement processes, time and increased experience with open source products will lead to a growing understanding and acceptance. And as this understanding progresses and becomes more accepted, open source will become a “go to” option to keep up with the fast moving technical environment, and perhaps eventually, as a standard first option, realizing the broader set of open source values by relying on the collective work and minds of a virtual community of IT “hackers”, “geeks” and “nerds”, working globally, 24x7/365 to explore, develop and showcase whatever tech that sparks their individual interest.
  • Top 5 open-source tools for machine learning

    Given the paradigmatic shifts that a true revolution in machine learning could bring, it’s important to maintain tech’s devotion to open-source. These kinds of scientific advancement don’t belong to any one company or corporation, but to the whole world. Making ML open and evenly distributed means everyone can join in this revolution.

  • Release of TinySegmenter 0.3
    Today I released version 0.3 of TinySegmenter, a Japanese Tokenizer in pure Python (released in New BSD license), with a single minor fix for proper install on systems not-using UTF-8 (apparently that still exists! :P). Thanks to Mišo Belica for the patch. Apparently some of his Japanese users are using it for Sumy, his software to extract summary from texts.
  • BSDTW 2017 CFP
     

    BSDTW 2017 will be held on the 11th and 12th of November 2017 (Sat/Sun), in Taipei. We are now requesting proposals for talks. We do not require academic or formal papers. If you wish to submit a formal paper, you are welcome to, but it is not required.

    The talks should be written with strong technical content. Presentations on the use of BSD in products and companies are strongly encouraged but marketing proposals are not appropriate for this venue.