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About Tux Machines

Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA Introduces 280 Linux Driver Series srlinuxx 03/07/2011 - 12:24am
Story Really Small Cheap Computers srlinuxx 03/07/2011 - 12:23am
Story GNU Awk gets major tune up in version 4.0.0 srlinuxx 03/07/2011 - 12:21am
Story OpenTTD on openSUSE - The perfect transport simulation srlinuxx 03/07/2011 - 12:20am
Story openSUSE Weekly News Issue 182 srlinuxx 03/07/2011 - 12:19am
Story Yet Another Open-Source Video Editor: Novacut srlinuxx 03/07/2011 - 12:18am
Story Now Powered by Simply MEPIS 11 srlinuxx 02/07/2011 - 1:00pm
Story Top 10 Dazzling GTK Themes srlinuxx 02/07/2011 - 12:58pm
Story How not to upgrade a Mint installation srlinuxx 02/07/2011 - 12:54pm
Story some howtos & leftovers: srlinuxx 02/07/2011 - 5:19am

Is Linux Ready for Small Biz?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: how valid are these considerations today?

Why now is the best time to switch to linux

Filed under
Linux

Today’s Linux is leaps and bounds ahead of yesterday’s. It is absolutely amazing to see how far Linux has come in 10, 5, and even 1 year ago. It is now a full featured lock and load desktop operating system that easily rivals windows. Now if we could only remove the fear factor that I discussed earlier get people to see the light.

Sabayon Linux 3.2 Mini Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon Linux is a relatively new distribution that is known for its looks with the inclusion of AIGLX, XGL, and Beryl. After the recent release of Sabayon Linux 3.2, the Mini Edition of the 3.2 branch has now been updated. Updates include newer ATI and NVIDIA proprietary display drivers, full NTFS read/write support out-of-the-box, and many other package updates and changes. It also looks very nice from the desktop side with its LiveCD. The Screenshots.

Immune your files from accidental deletion

Filed under
HowTos

Okay, when you accidentally type
rm LoveLetterFromJane.txt
Your file are gone, can’t resume it at trash, there are no trash, the document are important to you! Oh My God!! you smack your box!

Jono Bacon: Features vs. Freedom

Filed under
Ubuntu

Recently there has been a lot of discussion bubbling up regarding the possibility that Ubuntu will ship proprietary 3D drivers by default for some video cards. My aim here is not to discuss the specifics of that decision, which is still being fleshed out and ratified, but to instead define my views on the bigger picture behind the discussion - features vs. freedom.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 182

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Distributions in 2006

  • News: Fedora revamps RPM, KNOPPIX 5.1, Debian release update, Arch Linux Office Install CD, Dreamlinux interview
  • Released last week: SabayonLinux 3.2 "miniEdition", VectorLinux 5.8
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2007, K12LTSP Linux 6.0
  • New distributions: Kuliax
  • Reader comments

Read more in this year's final issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Review: Thunderbird 2.0 Beta 1 Adds New Look And Feel

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla, the developer of the free Thunderbird e-mail client, has taken a good program and made it better with the release of the version 2.0 beta 1. It is rare that a beta release is not buggy, clunky, and generally a mess -- especially when, as word has it, the developers are changing the code base -- but I was pleasantly surprised by its stability and the dearth of issues.

HOWTO compile SuperTux 0.3.0 (Milestone 1.9) on Ubuntu Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

SuperTux 0.3.0 has been out for hours now. What are you waiting for? Debian (unstable) and Ubuntu (Dapper or Edgy) users:

Linux Security: A Big Edge Over Windows

Filed under
Linux

Linux is better at locking down a computer than Windows. The Linux OS uses configuration settings and user permissions to a much more efficient degree than the Windows administrator account.

Open Source Investment Rose 131% in 2006

Filed under
OSS

The amount of venture capital funding invested in the Linux and open source-related vendors tracked by Computer Business Review rose 131% in 2006, vastly outpacing the IT market as a whole.

Ghost in the machine

Brent Northcutt is something of a ghost in the machine. As a system programmer for I-Land, the 32-year-old Warrensburg resident works his magic in languages with names such as PHP, Perl, and C++. A dedicated adherent to what is known in the virtual realm as the open source movement, Mr. Northcutt is most at home in the Unix-based Linux operating system.

Linux and its closing window of opportunity with OEMs

Filed under
Linux

I am planning on changing the world with this article. I can’t do it on my own: I need your help. Despite what people say, Linux does not have a significant slice just yet. By “significant slice”, here I mean 20% to 30%. We are nowhere near it, in fact.

Review: Stratus ftServer 4300

Filed under
Reviews

Lots of companies sell Linux servers, but how many promise 99.999% uptime? Not very many, but Stratus Technologies sells systems that offer the kind of fault tolerance that will handle mission-critical applications and leave admins with peace of mind. I had a chance to test out one of the company's ftServer 4300 systems, and it's an impressive system.

Pulling a story about the company’s name out of Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Ever wonder why Linux company Red Hat is called that? In an interview with Red Hat Magazine, co-founder BobYoung said that the red hat has long been a symbol of freedom, with revolutionaries in both America and France donning red caps during their uprisings.

Howtos and Tips, & tricks

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Mplayer in Ubuntu

  • Compiling RPM From Source RPMs
  • Install and Configure Apache2 with PHP5 and SSL Support in Debian Etch
  • Basics for the command line - for newbies

Opera 9.10 Released

Filed under
Software

Opera 9.10 has been officially released this morning. Having appeared on mirrors several days ago, this release was announced just this morning. This update brings some important bug fixes such as no more crashes with Flash 9, smooth scrolling fixed, and fixes to the Fraud Protection feature.

Also: Install Opera Web Browser in Ubuntu

Various ways of detecting rootkits in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Consider this scenario... Your machine running GNU/Linux has been penetrated by a hacker without your knowledge and he has swapped the passwd program which you use to change the user password with one of his own. His passwd program has the same name as the real passwd program and works flawlessly in all respects except for the fact that it will also gather data residing on your machine such as the user details each time it is run and transmit it to a remote location or it will open a back door for outsiders by providing easy root access and all the time, you will be impervious about its actions. This is an example of your machine getting rooted.

2006 Year in Review: Hits and Misses

Filed under
Misc

It was a year full of transitions and surprises, and the next year looks likely to bring more of the same. Here's a look at some of eWEEK's most interesting stories from 2006.

Who needs the command line? (Well, actually, we all do)

Filed under
Linux

As you might have guessed this is going to be a brazen and shameless plug for the command line. I write it to throw in my tuppence-worth after my own Linux experiences. I am also concerned about a new generation of users coming to GNU/Linux without a proper understanding of the underlying reasons for its superiority over Windows but this not a blow by blow comparison.

Game of the Day: Snakebite

Filed under
Gaming

Meet Snakebite. Now, you may not have heard of this "Snakebite" game for Linux. That's because it isn't a stand-alone game. Instead, it's a set of custom levels made for the classic game "Rocks n Diamonds". But, as you see from the screenshots, this is nothing like our old friend from Artsoft:

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

  • Google could be about to reveal its Android and Chrome OS merger
    If you've been following Google for a while you'll know that speculation around the company merging Android and Chrome OS into one single whole isn't anything new, but the rumours have gained fresh impetus over the weekend. Sources speaking to the usually reliable Android Police say Google is preparing to combine the two OSes into something codenamed Andromeda inside the company - that's also the name of the nearest galaxy to the Milky Way or the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia in Greek mythology, depending on which meaning you want to take.
  • Google’s Oct. 4th Event May Reveal Merged Android/Chrome OS
  • Oct 4th rumors: Google to show off merged Android/Chrome OS preview, $69 Chromecast Ultra and $129 Google Home
    Google is holding an event on October 4th, where the company is expected to officially launches its new Pixel and Pixel XL smartphones. But that’s not all we’re expecting to see on October 4th. According to several reports from Android Police, we could also see the launch of Google Home, a Chromecast Ultra, and a new wireless router called Google WiFi. Google may also show off a preview of an operating system that merges Chrome OS and Android, although it’s unlikely to be available to the public before 2017.
  • Android Users Replace Phones Faster Than iPhone Fans
    Every time a new Apple iPhone gets released, it seems like everyone who has chosen iOS over Alphabet 's Android immediately orders one. In reality, however, not every consumer trades in his or her phone just because a new model comes out. They may want to, but leasing cycles, payment plans and other factors influence whether people swap out their iPhone or Android phone after a new model is released. On the Apple side, consumers are actually holding onto their phones slightly longer, while with Android, the replacement cycle has been steady for the past three years, according to data from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP).
  • Sony Xperia X Performance users can register for Android 7.0 Nougat beta program (but not everywhere)
  • Leaked Presentation Slide Reveals Sony’s Android 7.0 Roadmap
    If you own an Android device that isn’t a Nexus, chances are you’re probably wondering when your phone will be updated to the latest version of Android, Android 7.0 Nougat. OEMs don’t usually reveal their update plans so early on, but the good news for Sony users is that we now have an idea of when the update will be released. This is thanks to an alleged leaked presentation slide as reported by Mojandroid.sk (via Xperia Blog) from Sony Slovakia. As you can see in the photo above, it shows the company’s plans for the Android 7.0 Nougat update. Assuming the timing is applicable for all markets they operate in, the Xperia X Performance and Xperia XZ should get their update in October.
  • Umi Plus International Giveaway [3 Phones]

digiKam 5.2.0 Linux RAW Image Editor Introduces a New Red Eyes Tool, Bug Fixes

The digiKam developers were proud to announce the release of the second maintenance update to the digiKam 5 latest stable series of the free and open source RAW image editor for GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more

wattOS 10 Microwatt Edition Comes with Less of Everything, Based on Ubuntu 16.04

After releasing the LXDE edition of wattOS 10 at the beginning of the month, developer Ronald Ropp now announced the availability of the Microwatt Edition, which includes less of everything when compared to its bigger brother. Read more

How to throw a tarball over the wall

It costs a lot of money to open source a mature piece of commercial software, even if all you are doing is "throwing a tarball over the wall." That's why companies abandoning software they no longer care about so rarely make it open source, and those abandoning open source projects rarely move them to new homes that benefit others. If all you have thought about is the eventual outcome, you may be surprised how expensive it is to get there. Read more