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Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Calculate Linux 14 released Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 12:55am
Story Matthew Garrett's Advice on Hardware, Linux Kernel Careers, and Fruit Flies Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 12:52am
Story MIPS aims new 64-bit Warrior cores at mobile devices Rianne Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 12:02am
Story Red Hat Developers Introduce New Tool For Linux Storage Management Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 9:19pm
Story From sketch to wrist: the evolution of Android Wear Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 9:13pm
Story Instant DIY controller project plans Linux add-on Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 8:10pm
Story Wine Announcement Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 8:03pm
Story Woman force in Open Source: Xorg joins the Outreach Program for Women Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 7:24pm
Story Motorola release Moto 360 Smartwatch, Moto X and Moto G upgrades announced Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 7:18pm
Story Dell targets businesses with new Chromeboxes Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2014 - 7:13pm

Mandriva 2008

Filed under
MDV

desktoplinux.wordpress: I’m trying out a new distro on my new laptop and so far, pretty good. This is a Dell Vostro 1500 (1 G RAM Intel 2 core duo) which came preloaded with Windows XP. I’ve had my eye on Mandriva for awhile. One thing I like about Mandriva is the option of upgrading to the Power Pack version if I choose.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: New Installer, with Stephan Kulow

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: I’m glad to announce the beginning of the Sneak Peaks at openSUSE 11.0 series! Over the next few weeks we will be taking a look at all of the exciting changes and improvements in openSUSE 11.0, with each article being followed by an interview with a developer in the field.

Bulgaria: 'Government's increasing use of Open Source inevitable'

Filed under
OSS

metamorphosis.org.mk: The Bulgarian government will turn more and more to Open Source software, predicts Krasimir Panayotov, coordinator of the GNU/Linux User Group in the city of Rousse, the country's fifth-largest city.

A Microsoft coupon bonanza for Novell? Not really

Filed under
SUSE

Matt Asay: Ed Moltzen writes headlines an article with "Microsoft's Coupon Money Boosts Novell's Linux Numbers," which is true on its face, but not as interesting under the covers. Justin Steinman, Novell's head of Linux marketing, had told me a week ago

IBM releases ODF-based Office killer

Filed under
Software

linuxworld.com: IBM has officially launched the commercial version of its Lotus Symphony suite of productivity applications, and looks set amount a challenge to Microsoft Office in its enterprise heartland.

Alternative distros: DeLi Linux

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: I'm in search of a lightweight distro for an ancient 1ghz, 128MB RAM laptop. One of these days, I'll find a distro that properly supports ACPI and VGA-out. I hope. Now it's time for DeLi Linux.

Why must everything be newbie-friendly?

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I love Ubuntu as much as the next person, and I won’t ever say a bad thing about it. But occasionally I see one unusual side effect of the Ubuntu phenomenon — the sudden press to make everything “newbie-friendly.”

Firefox 3 RC2: still flawed

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet: The world seems enamored of Firefox 3. I’m not one of them. I would like to be if it wasn’t for the flaws I keep finding when using the Mac version.

Installing Songbird Media Player On Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to set up Songbird 0.5 on Ubuntu 8.04. Taken from the Songbird page: "Songbird is a desktop media player mashed-up with the Web.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Second Firefox 3 Release Candidate now available for download

  • Firefox 3 RC 2 review
  • Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors
  • Mozilla Firefox 3.0 Is the Best Browser For Web — For Now
  • A Review of Songbird
  • How long will it be before Linux is on your desktop?
  • Smaller Than a Laptop, but Bigger Than a Phone
  • OpenSUSE 11 Release Candidate 1 Review
  • Rotate Apache logs using Awstats
  • Announcing the openSUSE Marketing Team
  • Ubuntu Global Bug Jam
  • 90 things that are the same in Microsoft Office and OpenOffice.org
  • Microsoft's Coupon Money Boosts Novell's Linux Numbers
  • Advice for anyone who wants to put on a regional Linux show (video)
  • Taking note of Basket
  • Ubuntu is Slow
  • IT posters to cover your empty walls

GNOME 2.23.3 Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: For those not interested by today's KDE 4.0.5 release, perhaps you're interested in trying out the latest development version of GNOME. GNOME 2.23.3 has been released and what's special about this release is a great number of bug fixes.

A review of blender-containing live CD's

Filed under
Linux

pterandon.blogspot: Nineteen different live CD Linux distros were tested on a laptop. Knoppix 5.3.1, SLAMPP, and Wolvix make the cut in my first round of evaluation of the best live Linux CD for 3D graphics work. Artistix and Sabayon showed some problems but get an honorable mention for the sheer quantities of graphics software available.

One-Time Contributers

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: Tony Luck offered some statistics focused on the frequency of developers that only contribute to the Linux kernel one time, "I skimmed through looking for drive-by contributors (defined as someone who contributes to just one release and is then never heard from again)."

How Linux saved my life

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Have you ever been in a situation where you realised the frailty of your own existence? It happened to me. I sat thinking this is the end of the line but how little did I realise that I had a saviour alongside me in the form of the free open source operating system called Linux.

WSJ to Microsoft: You need to open source Windows

Filed under
Microsoft

Matt Asay: Many of us have been saying for a long time that Microsoft's Windows product would be better if the company open sourced it. But today marks the first day that the Wall Street Journal has chimed in to second the motion.

Pardus Linux 2007.3: Nobody's business but the Turks

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: I've actually ranted on Pardus before, but for some reason during an update I lost the actual rant. I don't remember if I ranted on this particular release or not, but here I go again either way.

A short preview of Google Gadgets for Linux

Filed under
Software

ubuntudaily.com: About a year ago, Google released their desktop search called Google desktop for Linux. Today Google released an open source version of the Gadgets runtime for Linux!

Major Linux Migrations: An Unbelievable List of Nearly 100

Filed under
Linux

suseblog.com: Thoroughly thrilled at the thought of Munich’s progress switching to Linux, I have actually been tracking and logging such migrations for a long time. As a matter of fact, on my OpenSUSE Linux blog, I offer a course wherein I explore all of the migrations of which I am aware. I wanted to share that list with ya’ll.

Channel Insider Names Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2008 Product of the Year

Filed under
Linux

press release: Red Hat, Inc today announced that Channel Insider has named Red Hat Enterprise Linux the top server operating system in its 2008 Product of the Year awards. Winners exemplify attributes of high importance to the channel including value, support and profit potential.

Get Your Hands on Firefox 3 RC2 - Now!

Filed under
Moz/FF

maximumpc.com: As reported by MacObserver and ZDNet's Andrian Kingsley-Hughes, Mozilla is rolling out Firefox 3's Release Candidate 2. Although the Firefox RC page doesn't yet provide shortcuts to RC2, it's easy to edit the shortcuts provided on the RC1 page to get your hands on RC2 right now:

Also: Firefox 3.0 a memory hog?

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.