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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Ubuntu Summit: Inside the Googleplex

Filed under
Ubuntu

I'm at the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Mountain View, California in the heart of Silicon Valley -- at the Googleplex. This biannual event is held within a couple of weeks of every Ubuntu release, to plan the features, processes and the development cycle for the next release -- in this case "Feisty" which will become Ubuntu 7.04 when it releases in April next year.

Can GPLv3 Corral Open Source Licenses?

Filed under
OSS

The impact of GPLv3 on license proliferation will depend on the FOSS license's final form, which is being shaped largely by the DRM and patent issues, said Finnegan-Henderson Partner Larry Robins. If these controversial terms remain in the GPLv3, then license proliferation may actually increase.

A Diehard SUSE User Tries Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under
Reviews

Unless you are living under a rock, you probably know production Ubuntu 6.10 was released on October 26. I'd heard that it was a nice package, but really haven't spent much time with it. SUSE Linux and I have been together for quite a while and when you have something that works, you stick with it. Many readers are probably in the same boat.

OSDL Tags Fellowship Fund Donations for Linux Kernel Documentation

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a global consortium dedicated to accelerating the adoption of Linux® and open source software, today announced the first fellowship grant from its Fellowship Fund announced earlier this year. The one-year fellowship grant will sponsor a technical writer, whose work will be targeted at Linux kernel documentation, further accelerating and maximizing Linux development.

Free Your Mind!

Filed under
Linux

The last Linux comparison that we did was exactly 13 months ago; and in that short period, things have really moved to the next level. Newer versions of applications have come up, a lot of work has gone into making the Graphical User Interface (GUI) less intimidating, the Kernel has been spruced up, hardware databases have expanded and overall, using Linux is now an enjoyable experience.

VMX Builder: Create virtual machines in minutes

Filed under
HowTos

While VMware Player is not designed to create virtual machines from scratch, other tools can help you to build your own VMs in a matter of minutes. You could use VMware's free VMware Server software, but it's overkill if you only need a quick-and-dirty way to build a VM. Instead, consider VMX Builder, an easy-to-use desktop tool for creating VMware virtual machines.

Check Debian archive mirrors bandwidth using apt-spy

Filed under
HowTos

apt-spy is a program that tests a series of Debian archive mirrors for bandwith.It writes an /etc/apt/sources.list with the fastest server.You can select which of the many Debian sites to benchmark by geographical location.

Bang for the Buck: Entry Linux Servers Keep Windows and Unix Honest

Filed under
OS

Only 15 years ago, Linus Torvalds was annoyed enough about the expense of the just-commercialized Unix workstations and systems on the market that he started to create his own operating system. Proprietary operating systems still have their niches--and they will for a long time to come--and a formerly ascendant Unix has been pushed out of the entry server space by Linux and Windows.

Adobe to donate script code to Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

Adobe will donate software to run JavaScript programs in the Firefox Web browser, the largest code contribution yet to the open-source Mozilla Foundation.

Is Microsoft Going to Start a Linux War?

Filed under
Linux

You bet! Here are the reasons why. I suspect that the big enterprise players are each going to jump on one of the various Linux boats and start a software war. The fact is, Microsoft is way overdue in this effort.

Bootcamp: Installing Linux part 4

Filed under
MDV

We'll round off this short series on 'dual booting' Linux and Windows with a brief tour of your new operating system. It begins with the Bootloader screen that appears a few moments after switch-on.

How To Set up a repository cache with apt-cacher

Filed under
HowTos

When running multiple machine with the same distribution, it is interesting to set up a repository cache on your network so that once a package is downloaded from an official repository, all other machines will download it from your local area network.

Help design tomorrow's Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

What should the Linux desktop of 2007 and beyond be like? That's what the OSDL wants to know in its latest Linux Client Survey, which runs from now until Dec. 1. The results will help the OSDL's Desktop Working Group work on the areas of development that are critical to users.

Novell: We Surrender

Filed under
SUSE

On Thursday night, I asked Jeff Jaffe, Novell's chief technology officer, if he could think of a company that had partnered with Microsoft and done really well as a result. Which Microsoft alliance, I asked him, would he cite as the model that he'd like to emulate? His response: "I think this partnership is breaking new ground."

Linux Desktop Vendors Show Worthy Alternatives

Filed under
Linux

Vista be damned. Novell, Red Hat and Ubuntu are showing the world that Linux is getting its desktop house in order. Novell made its SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 desktop available in July, Ubuntu shipped a new version of its Debian-based distribution a few weeks ago and Red Hat will release its Enterprise 5.0 version early next year.

Wolvix Hunter 1.0.5 Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I was drawn to Wolvix by a review of an earlier version on [some other site], where the reviewer raved about its multimedia capabilities. As installing codecs and plugins has always been one of my least favourite admin tasks, I thought I'd try Wolvix Hunter 1.0.5, which claimed to come with all the usual suspects pre-installed.

PS3 to ship without Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

Sony's PlayStation 3 (PS3), due this month, will not ship with Linux pre-installed, as suggested in March by CEO Ken Kuturagi. However, TerraSoft CEO Kai Staats says his company's Yellow Dog Linux is installable by "anybody who knows how to use a keyboard, mouse, and browser," according to an interview in the Coloradoan.

Quetoo 0.5.0 released

Filed under
Gaming

Quetoo, a for performance optimized version of Quake2, has just been released in version 0.5.0 and is available for download now.

Ubuntu Tricks - 4 ways to run Root privileged processes without a password.

Filed under
HowTos

I’ve had three email requests now to right up how to execute things that normally require root privileges without having to enter a password. There are a number of ways to do this and we’re going to look at four of them.

Review: GnuCash 2.0

Filed under
Software

GnuCash is a personal and small business accounting package that provides true double-entry accounting, the ability to set up automatic recurring transactions, and simple budgeting. The application does not try to hide the complexities of managing...

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More in Tux Machines

The Importance of BSD

The Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) is a Unix operating system developed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley. Read more

Ubuntu 16.10 Unity and Ubuntu MATE

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 / Mir - Current State
  • Bytemark sponsor Ubuntu MATE
    A couple of weeks ago the Bytemark Managing Director, Matthew Bloch, contacted the Ubuntu MATE team to offer free hosting for the project. As of August 18th 2016 all the Ubuntu MATE infrastucture is hosted on Bytemark Cloud Servers.
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Beta 1
    We are underwhelmed to announce, quite possibly, our most uninteresting beta release E-V-E-R! ;-) This beta release is all about the plumbing that transitions Ubuntu MATE to GTK 3.20. It really isn’t very interesting from an end-users perspective.

Linux Foundation and Linux Birthday

LWN at GUADEC

  • Flowgraphs in GTK+
    At GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany, Daniel "grindhold" Brendle presented his work developing a new library and widget set that will allow GTK+ applications to implement flowgraphs in a standard manner. The widget set would enable applications to provide interactive widgets for linking filters and other block-oriented components—a type of interface many applications currently need to reinvent on their own. Flowgraphs, Brendle explained, are a general-purpose diagramming technique that many people will recognize from textbooks and other printed matter. They show how objects, information, and signals flow through some sort of process. Biology textbooks use them to illustrate circulation in the body, technical manuals use them to show how a manufacturing process runs, and so on. In software, he said, they are most familiar as the node-and-pipe diagrams that illustrate signal processing or data filtering.
  • The GNOME Newcomers initiative
    At GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany, Bastien Ilsø and Carlos Soriano reported on the revamped Newcomers section of the GNOME web site. The section is intended to draw in new users and developers and help them find their way around the project as well as to help them get the necessary development environment set up to begin contributing code.