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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu For Tablets: Hot or Not? srlinuxx 21/03/2013 - 2:26am
Story There Is Ubuntu, There Is Linux And Then There Are Others srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 11:19pm
Story Open Source in Kenya srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 8:35pm
Story The Best Servers for Linux in 2013 srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 8:34pm
Story GNOME 3.8 - Jon McCann talks future srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 8:32pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 6:54pm
Story Changes in Ubuntu releases srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 5:28pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 5:12pm
Story Trisquel 6.0 Review: High performing and elegant srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 1:35am
Story Python Settles Trademark Dispute srlinuxx 20/03/2013 - 1:18am

Thoughts on Flock 0.9

Filed under
Moz/FF

paulstamatiou.com: Recently the social web browser company Flock rolled out a milestone release, version 0.9. While it’s not a 1.0, the new release totes some awe-inspiring new features that put it on a different level than the last major release, Beta 1 (my review), almost a year ago.

A Look at KDE 4 Alpha

Filed under
KDE

thelins: This page is dedicated to tracking the early releases of KDE 4. Each release is being tried out and screenshots are provided. As KDE 4 alpha 2 was released I tested the live CD. For the interested reader I took some screenshots.

Dell fixes Ubuntu laptop pricing

Filed under
Ubuntu

DesktopLinux: Dell Ubuntu Linux buyers were recently outraged when a price comparison between identical Inspiron 1420 laptops showed that instead of the Ubuntu system being cheaper, it actually ended up costing $225 more than the same laptop with Vista Home Basic Edition. Dell says that the prices have been reset to the appropriate prices.

CUPS Purchased by Apple Inc.

Filed under
Software

cups.org: In February of 2007, Apple Inc. acquired ownership the CUPS source code and hired me (Michael R Sweet), the creator of CUPS. CUPS will still be released under the existing GPL2/LGPL2 licensing terms, and I will continue to develop and support CUPS at Apple.

Dude, you don't have to get a Dell

Filed under
Linux

MaximumPC: If you're a newb looking to dip your toe into the waters of the Linux world, Dell's line-up of preinstalled Ubuntu PCs is a very good first choice. But while Dell certainly appears to have the best offering of Linux desktops and notebooks at the moment, it isn't the only choice out there. Here are five alternatives for Linux-ready PCs.

Linux: Reviewing The Tickless Kernel For x86-64

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Included in Andrew Morton's potential 2.6.23 merge list were a series of patches to make the x86-64 architecture tickless. Andi Kleen, the x86-64 maintainer replied, "I'm sceptical about the dynticks code. It just rips out the x86-64 timing code completely."

Willing to buy a high-end, free-software-only laptop?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth: With projects like Gobuntu and gNewSense aiming to provide a platform that is zealous about free software, the obvious question is “where can I run it?”. And right now, as far as laptops go, there are no good answers.

Dzen: pop-up windows from the command-line

linux.com: I stumbled across an interesting and useful tool recently called dzen, a "general purpose messaging and notification program" written by Rob Manea. Basically, dzen provides an instant-on/instant-off pop-up terminal window, along with a multitude of options that allow you to run just about any command.

Linspire releases Open XML translator

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux: Linux vendor Linspire on July 11 said that the new Open XML translator is now available for use in its latest Freespire and Linspire distributions. The Open XML translator enables bi-directional compatibility, so that files saved in the Microsoft-created Open XML format can be opened by OpenOffice.org users, and files created by OpenOffice can be saved in Open XML format.

A beginner’s introduction to the GNU/Linux command line—Managing processes

Filed under
HowTos

element14: Your GNU/Linux computer is an amazing machine. It can display images. It can run programs. It can perform dozens of functions all at the same time. How can you keep track of all this activity?

VMGL: Full OpenGL 3D Hardware Acceleration For Virtual Machines

Filed under
Software

E@zyVG: Introducing VMGL, which provides OpenGL Hardware 3D Acceleration for Virtual Machines. When tested in xen with Quake 3 & Unreal Tournament 2004 it provides for up to 87% of the performance of the native implementation.

10 ideas to improve Gnome

Filed under
Software

Fabrice Facorat: I've just read an article about 10 ways to improve the GNOME Desktop, and I must admit that many points are sensible. Let analyze them :

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users.

A three-pronged attack on performance

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: A computer running Linux can outperform the same computer running Windows XP or Vista. Even so, you may be able to make your Linux system even faster. Here are three optimizations, at different levels, that can make your Linux system perform better.

Should FOSS Change to a Dual License?

Filed under
OSS

Penguin Pete: Microsoft is like a stoned Pac-Man with the munchies gobbling up Linux lately. The latest recruit is TurboLinux, who is going to help them spread the foulness that is OOXML (pronounced "ooks-mull"). While we're all scampering around in circles asking "What are they doing? Who will they eat next? What is their strategy?", has anybody considered that maybe they've simply decided to keep buying GNU/Linux until they own it?

First look: Skype for the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet

Filed under
Software

ars technica: When the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet was announced at the beginning of the year, we were excited about the successor to the 770. Not only was there an updated version of the Linux-based Internet Tablet OS and significantly-improved hardware, but Nokia also promised us a fully-functional Skype client for the N800. Nearly six months after the tablet's launch, the Skype client has finally arrived.

Also: At the races with the Kangaroo TV

Preliminary Review: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon Alpha 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher: My heart sank a little bit as I sat through 2-3 minutes of what can only be described as 'error messages' while this early release of Gutsy Gibbon booted on my virtual machine - although it came through in the end. Here we have the Alpha 2 release of Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon for me to cast a preliminary eye over 3 months prior to release.

Linux: Revisiting Swap Prefetch

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Another thread discussed potentially merging the swap prefetch patch into the mainline Linux kernel. Con Kolivas started the thread saying "I fixed all bugs I could find and improved it as much as I could last kernel cycle. Put me and the users out of our misery and merge it now or delete it forever please."

Coming Full Circle on PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

Yet Another Linux Blog: I see articles like OSWeekly’s "The Future of Publishing with Linux Magazines" and I chuckle a bit. Mainly because PCLinuxOS Magazine will have its 12 monthly issue published next month.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)