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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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What’s Coming In Ubuntu 8.10: Intrepid Ibex

Filed under
Ubuntu

davestechsupport.com/blog: Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) Beta was just released and it is a routine event that precedes the fast approaching final release of the next major upgrade to Ubuntu Linux. A lot of hype has been generated over the last 6 months about what new features and changes would be included with Ibex.

Omega 10 Live CD Beta: Fedora With Added Multimedia

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: AN interesting new Linux project released in the last week, Omega 10, cuts through the old debate about free/proprietary software with a solution I am sure many will find appealing - and just as many will abhor.

gOS 3 - the most beautiful Linux

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Linux

amumtaz.wordpress: A few months ago Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu Linux, called upon open source developers to surpass Apple and their wonderful MacOS-X based user experience. Well, gOS release 3 could be close to doing just that.

Atmosphir Game Review

Filed under
Gaming

linuxhaxor.net: Atmosphir is a third person, 3D, platform/adventure game that not only allows you to explore through diverse levels and challenges, but also gives you the tools to design your own levels and upload them for others to play.

Linux turns 17

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Linux

linuxjournal.com: Free minix-like kernel sources for 386-AT, was the subject of Linus Benedict Torvalds post to comp.os.minix on October 5, 1991 -- seventeen years ago today. Linus didn't know what he was unleashing.

Testing Some Distributions

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Linux

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I’ll be the first to admit it - when it comes to Linux, I am a habitual “Distro-hopper”. I don’t like being a distro-hopper, and I haven’t always been a distro-hopper.

Ultima Linux 8.4: Ultimate headache

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Linux

derekcordeiro.com: After a long time I have a headache after installing and trying to set up a linux distro. Although there are some positive reviews of this version of Ultima, I wonder if they really installed it or just ran it live.

Mozilla CEO John Lilly: World Domination Is Overrated

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Interviews
Moz/FF

linuxinsider.com: Mozilla rose from the ashes of Netscape with only one goal: Provide an alternative to Microsoft, which dominated the Web browser market and still does. In an interview with the San Jose Mercury News, CEO John Lilly discusses Mozilla's corporate philosophy and whether Google's Chrome is a threat.

logstalgia: pong-like apache log viewer

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Software

debaday.debian.net: Logstalgia (inspired by glTail) is a website traffic visualization tool that replays or streams Apache access logs as a pong-like battle between the web server and an unrelenting army of requesting hosts. It is rendered using OpenGL, so you’ll need a 3D accelerated video card to run logstalgia.

Ubuntu Tweak Guide

Filed under
Ubuntu

jaysonrowe.wordpress: Installing Ubuntu can literally be as easy as typing in some very basic information, and clicking next a few times. There is, however always some room for tweaking.

Google releases Linux repositories

Filed under
Linux
Google

tectonic.co.za: Search giant Google has finally launched a repository of its software for Linux users. The repository will house the latest Linux versions of its software and make it easier for Linux users to keep up to date.

Slackware v Ubuntu: Not What You Think - Part 2 & 3

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Linux

opensfreedom.blogspot: So where does Slackware fall in those regards we talked about with Ubuntu last? That is, on package installation and repositories.

Fix your music library: song names, album art, automatically

Filed under
Software

blogs.howtogeek: With every new version of media players, we get new beautiful album art views, recommendations and all kinds of sorting by genre, year, composer. These are all based on correct information stored in the songs 'tags'.

The BeBook eBook Reader is a great device

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Linux

linuxinfusion.com: My eBook reader for the past year or more has been my trusty Palm IIIxe which was given a new lease on life thanks to great eBook reading software like Plucker and Weasel Reader. However, There are obvious down-sides and I decided that it was time to look around for a dedicated eBook reader.

Free, Professional Music Production: A Linux Introduction

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Software

hehe2.net: When I’m not designing websites with Kompozer or writing articles like this on OpenOffice.org’s word processor, I love playing and listening to music. While the numerous Linux distros tailored to multimedia have their own arrangements and unique quirks, they’ve got a few common threads in the software they use.

odds & ends

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News
  • Support Amarok This Roktober '08

  • Camp KDE 2009: Jamaican me crazy
  • Camp KDE 2009: Call For Presentations
  • My Story With Linux - Part 1
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Beta Video - Using Guest Session
  • Open-source software and Linux at HP
  • Create High Quality Flash Videos in Ubuntu
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 10/03

some shorts

Filed under
Linux

Opera 9.6 RC 2

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Were you already giving up on the hope of a new toy for the weekend? Don't despair: we have a new RC for the upcoming 9.6 release. Happy testing!

Simply Mepis Linux and My Office

Filed under
Linux

preacherpen.wordpress: I do a lot of work on my home computers; one is a desktop, and the other is a laptop. Both of them are running Simply Mepis Linux, and are working very well. What do I use Linux for in my office?

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more