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Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Ubuntu 11.10 - Take 2 fieldyweb 05/11/2011 - 8:50pm
Story What is the KDE Program? srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 8:46pm
Story The 'Year of the Linux desktop' isn't coming srlinuxx 1 05/11/2011 - 8:19pm
Story College near Mangalore hosts three-day Debian meet srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 6:40pm
Story How To Restore Firefox Bookmarks srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 6:37pm
Story Fedora 16 is gold, but more importantly… srlinuxx 1 05/11/2011 - 2:03am
Story Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Will Recommend 64-bit srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 1:54am
Story GNOME Shell Now Works With Software Rendering srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 1:45am
Story OpenOffice4Kids (OOo4Kids) - What has changed? srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 1:41am
Story A walk down Firefox memory lane srlinuxx 05/11/2011 - 1:35am

Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 4 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

A new test (Herd) release is now available from the Ubuntu camp. This is the fourth testing release in the road to Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn this April. In today's screenshots we show off a few of the changes in this release along with the improved Ubuntu Hardware Database.

Downloading wallpapers the easy way in KDE

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HowTos

KDE has an easy way to download and install wallpapers from KDE-look.org. Here are the steps:

RPM development on the road to revival

Filed under
Software

The RPM Package Manager (RPM) package format and utilities are the backbone of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), Fedora Core, SUSE, and Mandriva Linux distributions, a host of smaller distros, and the Linux Standard Base. For years, the RPM utilities and specification were maintained by Red Hat. That changed in 2006 when, following a lengthy period of uncertainty, the company relaunched rpm.org as an independent hub for RPM development.

Mandriva Flash 2007: the unexpected gift

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

With the current technologies, a 2 GB USB stick is not expensive. This is why Mandriva thought of releasing Mandriva Flash on December 7, and they have chosen a high-quality 2 GB USB stick as a medium for it. I have recently received a complimentary Mandriva Flash for reviewing. I have used it for a few days, and here's what my experiences were.

Opera code names uncovered

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Software

We've had some requests lately about where Opera 9.x is heading, so I'll give you a sneak peak into the current projects and their internal code names. We usually prefer code names over version numbers until the product actually ships.

Open Source Community or Industry? - Predatory Open Source?

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OSS

I’m old enough to remember installing and using GNU EMACS, Perl, and even Linux before the term Open Source was coined. It seems like Open Source has become somewhat less of a community and more of an industry over the years. For me, the big event was when Red Hat stopped providing free ISO downloads and updates for Red Hat Linux (after RH9).

Linus fires latest shot in GNOME Wars

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Software

Some bad blood between Linus Torvalds and GNOME developers is flaring up again. Previously, Torvalds has said that Linux users should switch to KDE instead of GNOME because of the GNOME team's "users are idiots" mentality. Now he has "put his money where his mouth is" by submitting patches to the GNOME Print Dialog in order to have it behave as he likes.

Is there a secret story behind the Novell/Microsoft deal?

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SUSE

Was the Novell/Microsoft deal a worthwhile well-meaning effort between renegade open-source geeks at Microsoft and geeks at Novell that got derailed by salespeople and management, after which it was turned into a nightmare deal with the devil?

Also: GPL Draft Has Microsoft/Novell Deal in Mind

Ballmer: Novell deal proves open source needs to ‘respect IP rights’

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OSS

The same week that Microsoft issued a press release providing further details about some of the technological advances that will result from the November 2006 technology agreement between Novell and Microsoft, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer told Wall Street what he really thinks the deal means to Microsoft.

Ubuntu "Feisty Fawn" 7.04 with Migration Assitant

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu "Feisty Fawn" 7.04 is planned for release on April 19th. Herd 4, the fourth alpha release, adds couple of interesting features: migration assitant, and easy codec installation.

Tip jar: Open-source advice abounds at LinuxWorld

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OSS

Still looking for ideas about bringing some Linux and other open-source applications to your company? Here at this week's LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit, experts have been advising attendees on what to look for and how to evaluate choices, and offering their real-world experiences with deploying open-source software inside their own operations.

Samba developers stay put, thank you very much

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News

On February 6, the blog Boycott Novell ran a story suggesting that Novell's Samba development team had resigned en masse to take jobs at rival Red Hat, in protest over Novell's well-publicized patent agreement with Microsoft. That would be big news, a major coup for Red Hat. Closer inspection, however, reveals that it simply didn't happen.

Read more

Intel GMA 3000 Performance Q1'07

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Software

The last time Phoronix had taken a thorough look at Intel's Linux display drivers was last October when we had shared our initial performance figures for the GMA 3000 integrated graphics processor found on the Q965 Express. With more and more readers inquiring about Intel's open-source graphics offerings, we have decided to take another look.

How to Set up Network Bonding in Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Network Bonding, otherwise known as port trunking allows you to combine multiple network ports into a single group, effectively aggregating the bandwidth of multiple interfaces into a single connection. For example, you can aggregate two gigabyte ports into a two-gigabyte trunk port. Bonding is used primarily to provide network load balancing and fault tolerance.

http://www.howtoforge.com/network_bonding_ubuntu_6.10

Report: businesses going open-source

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OSS

Two reports released this week show that open-source software is gaining adoption worldwide - to the extent that it is putting significant pressure on commercial software companies and their business models.

Save the BBC from Windows DRM!

Filed under
OSS

The BBC has a long and glorious past as a technological innovator. Throughout the history of broadcasting, it has often been the first to develop and promote new technologies. Sadly, it seems now to be teetering on the brink of making technical choices that will not only damage its own reputation as a world-class institution, but which will also have serious knock-on consequences for free software.

What if Microsoft Ignored Linux?

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OS

Let’s be clear, Linux really isn’t the most lucrative platform on the market. It goes on the least expensive hardware, and much of what goes into it appears subsidized by other revenue streams. Linux isn’t changing much and there is no risk of Linux going away. What would happen if Microsoft got its act together and came up with an effective anti-Linux strategy instead of the pro-Linux strategy they now have?

Improved ways to suspend and hibernate a laptop under Linux

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HowTos

Last June I wrote about suspending and hibernating laptops under Linux. Since then a few things have changed -- thankfully, for the better -- so it's time to revisit the subject. Also, a few readers have responded offering suggestions for improving the suspend shell script I wrote back then, and I've incorporated these suggestions in a new version; unfortunately most of the comments are anonymous, so I can't give proper credit to their authors.

Galternatives - Graphical setup tool for Alternatives Configuration in Ubuntu

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Software

There are several programs fulfilling the same or similar functions to be installed on a single system at the same time. For example, many systems have several text editors, different web browsers, Multimedia players, or graphics editors at once.

PHP hardening patch - Suhosin

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HowTos

PHP has a notorious security history, but web hosts have to provide it. Suhosin is a security patch that can be applied to change behaviour of the default PHP install in security related ways, and is now packaged in Debian Etch and Sid, with some of it built into the default PHP builds, and some available as an extra.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

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