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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu: A new "Unity 8" flavour Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2014 - 5:12am
Story ATOM TEXT EDITOR UBUNTU PPA UPDATE Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2014 - 5:06am
Story GNOME Shell 3.12.2 Fixes Airplane Mode Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2014 - 4:56am
Story Snapdragon-based COM supports extreme temperatures Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2014 - 4:53am
Story Is Linux Secure, Old Flaw Fixed, and Patchin Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2014 - 4:46am
Story Intel vs. Radeon vs. Nouveau On Linux 3.15 + Mesa 10.3-devel Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:33pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.10.40 Is Out with Multiple Fixes and Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:27pm
Story FUDCon Beijing 2014 featuring Richard Stallman Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:18pm
Story Canonical Juju DevOps tool coming to CentOS and Windows Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:13pm
Story LXQt desktop environment screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 14/05/2014 - 11:02pm

Ubuntu Dell Inspiron 6400 : a quick review

Filed under
Ubuntu

ndeschildre.net: A month ago I ordered one of the new Ubuntu Dell on the Dell France website : the Inspiron 6400. The base price was around 450 euros, and I took almost all the upgrades, for a final price of around 750 euros.

Army's massive software initative designed to change the battlefield

Filed under
Linux

statesman.com: They are working on the largest software program in Defense Department history, a project that the military says dwarfs Microsoft's Windows. Boeing and the Army said they chose not to use Microsoft's proprietary software because they didn't want to be beholden to the company, opting instead to develop a Linux-based operating system based on publicly available code.

Bear Mistake No. 1: Never sleep on Red Hat Inc.

Filed under
Linux

thestockmasters.com: Microsoft is still selling their Vista operating systems, good for them. But the future ladies and gentlemen is not Microsoft, rather it's all the nerdy coders that created the Open Source wave.

Everex CloudBook is delayed

Filed under
Hardware

computerworld: Everex said today that its highly anticipated ultramobile CloudBook PC won't make it into U.S. consumers' hands for another month or so, as the Taiwanese vendor makes last-minute changes to its Linux-based software.

Supporting The Latest and Greatest; Supporting the Oldest and Slowest

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: Like most people who do tech work of some sort or another for a living I love my toys. I’d love to have the latest and greatest gee whiz system and if I won the lottery I probably always would. Today’s best full-featured distros all have native 64-bit versions.

KDE Commit-Digest for 20th January 2008

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Taskbar and KMenu functionality from KDE 3.5 returns to the Plasma panel, and work on clocks in Plasma, with the move of the binary-clock Plasmoid to kdereview. Improvements in annotation handling in Okular (which has been officially capitalised). Essential support for viewing bug contents in the rewrite of KBugBuster.

The Non-Revocable GPL

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: I know by now you've seen the notice by the guy claiming to "revoke" the GPL license on his code, because I'm getting email about it. Here's the answer to your question: No.

Mandriva Linux 2008.1 Spring Beta 1 Screenshots

Filed under
MDV

phoronix: The Mandriva team is busy cooking up a new spring release with the first development release being codenamed Ophrys. The first beta release for Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring is now available, and it features Perl 5.10 integration, the latest GNOME and KDE packages, and the Linux 2.6.24-rc8 kernel.

Not the Gentoo Linux Newsletter, Π edition

Filed under
Gentoo

Highlights include: How to grow minions, Gentoo as a religion?, Portage needs you!, and Things not to do to your Gentoo.

Scheduler Merges for 2.6.25

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Ingo Molnar posted a merge request for the latest git scheduler tree summarizing, "it contains various enhancements to the scheduler - find the full shortlog is below. 96 commits from 19 authors - scheduler developers have been busy again."

Free/Open-source First-person Shooter Games

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.blogspot: A first-person shooter (Commonly called FPS) is an action video game that involves "an avatar, one or more ranged weapons, and a varying number of enemies". I have collected some quality free/open-source first-person shooter games.

Adventures in Eee PC land

Filed under
Hardware

bytebot.net: I bit the bullet, and picked up an Asus Eee PC today, while I failed at an attempt to get a rack. Its a 4GB model, with the webcam, and its on its 3rd run, i.e. I’ve got a model without a mini-PCIe connector.

Install Photoshop CS2 on Your Ubuntu PC

Filed under
HowTos

softpedia.com: Starting from last night, Photoshop CS2 can now be installed easily by using Wine... on any Linux distribution! "Photoshop CS/CS2 should now work, please help us testing it" - said the wonderful people behind the Wine project.

Arch: Pros Only, But Not Bad

Filed under
Linux

distrogue.blogspot: Arch Linux is one of the few distributions to be optimized for an i686 processor- in other words, it's really fast without having to compile anything. It uses a custom package manager called Pacman.

Was Vista a disaster for Microsoft?

Filed under
Microsoft

zerias.blogspot: Fact is, while Vista has been a disaster for Microsoft, Xp has not. Xp has easily maintained a sales ratio of 3 to 1 or greater during the time since Vista's launch. Consider then that Xp prices were not slashed. They were not dropped. If you want Xp, you pay the same exact price today that you would have before Vista launched.

Bring the Web Editor Back to the Desktop

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Since Writely, being able to edit documents with others has gone from some fancy new technology to being the standard in most web applications. It was “the thing” to work on a document with three others at the same time, and still is. But the trend seems to stick with web editors. Gobby answers the call for a desktop editor.

Ubuntu Linux on an HP DV9627CL

Filed under
Ubuntu

dmartin.org: I was in the market for a laptop, and if I am anything, it's a frugal gadget geek. Buy.com had a deal on refurbished HP DV9627CL laptops for $700. Unfortunately, it came with the Microsoft tax that I didn't want.

Examining the XO Activities and Durability

Filed under
OLPC

blue-gnu.biz: Having thrown around a few initial impressions about the OLPC XOs, I thought I would take a more in-depth look at the user interface and some of the activities kids can engage in. And I have a couple of comments about their durability and adjustable screens.

Commentary: ISO should kick OOXML off the standards bus

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: ECMA, the international IT standards association, recently published its responses to comments of the ISO National Bodies in response to Microsoft's Office Open XML application for ISO standardization (the actual 2,293-page response is closed to the public). The ECMA proposals will be discussed at a Ballot Resolution Meeting (BRM) in Geneva after which the National Bodies may reconsider their original vote.

Spam and Virus filtering for e-mail with UNIX

Filed under
Software

Look beyond tools like SpamAssassin and Amavis to see how you can extend them and provide additional filtering facilities to lower the amount of spam hitting the e-mail boxes of your users. Most companies use spam and virus filtering services on their UNIX platforms, but there are some methods that you can use that help improve your filtering scores and might even eliminate spam reaching inboxes.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more