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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry How Ubuntu can save the Linux Desktop fieldyweb 30/07/2012 - 7:42pm
Story Why Linux will never rule on the desktop srlinuxx 30/07/2012 - 2:10am
Story AntiX 12: Most complete lightweight Linux distro I have seen! srlinuxx 28/07/2012 - 3:23am
Story This Week in Linux srlinuxx 28/07/2012 - 3:22am
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 28/07/2012 - 3:20am
Story Valve On Linux In Two Weeks srlinuxx 27/07/2012 - 8:02am
Story The GUI Bloat Effect srlinuxx 27/07/2012 - 7:59am
Story Sabayon 9 KDE review & stuff srlinuxx 27/07/2012 - 7:57am
Story Google doesn’t want people to know about better software srlinuxx 27/07/2012 - 3:52am
Story Review: Linux Mint 13 LTS "Maya" KDE srlinuxx 27/07/2012 - 2:38am

Another Novell employee leaves

Filed under
SUSE

This marks my 261st blog entry as a Novell employee. It shall also mark my last. An operose decision, I resigned as Chief Architect of our Linux Desktop endeavor, effective today.

Ubuntu: Too Good to be True?

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I decided a few months ago, when I set up a new Dell desktop machine, that Microsoft and I were about to part company. That happened when I was "invited" to "authenticate" my copy of Microsoft XP to be sure it was "genuine."

64 Studio 1.3.0 'Let Me Take You to the Beach' Released

Filed under
Linux

64 Studio is a GNU/Linux distribution tailor-made for digital content creation, including audio, video, graphics and publishing tools. A remix of Debian testing, it comes in both AMD64/Intel64 and 32-bit flavours, to run on nearly all PC hardware.

Dell explains Linux delays

Filed under
Linux

It emerged early on Thursday that UK customers would not be offered pre-installed Ubuntu for the time being. Later in the day, Dell's EMEA director of client marketing, Eric Greffier, elaborated further. Speaking to ZDNet UK he suggested that the greatest volume of responses to its Linux survey had come from the US, but he also pointed to wider considerations.

Firefox and Linux redux (and OpenBSD)

Filed under
Moz/FF

Part of the behind-the-scenes stuff that people don’t see is the coordination that goes on as part of our trademark approval process. Red Hat and Novell have been working closely with us for quite some time, but other distros have not been as involved. I was very fortunate to work with Alexander Sack of Ubuntu and Martynas Venckus of OpenBSD to get their distros in the same loop.

What’s new in SELinux for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5?

Filed under
Linux

Dan Walsh will be presenting an overview of “What’s new with SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5″ at the Red Hat Summit on Wednesday May 9th at 3:00 PM in the “What’s New” Track. This article presents some of the material from that talk, and was written with frequent magazine contributor Len DiMaggio.

Software security? Do I have to?

Rosie's blog builders say it's all about community

Filed under
Drupal

EchoDitto helps its clients create online communities. It believes in open source software and relies heavily on the Drupal content management system both internally and for its customers. EchoDitto CTO and co-founder Justin Pinder says it's the community that makes open source invaluable.

KDE Screen captures with KSnapshot

Filed under
KDE

The KDE desktop environment for Linux has a handy graphics tool for capturing screenshots called KSnapshot. This utility lets you make screenshots in any of 4 different capture modes and allows you to save the results as JPEG, PNG or XPM files.

Desktop Linux For All?

Filed under
Linux

Hallelujah! Linux on the desktop has finally arrived!

Or has it been here all along?

This week's mammothly hyped news that Dell would be shipping PCs with Ubuntu Linux pre-loaded has been hailed by some as a momentous occasion for the Linux desktop. One might be tempted to think that no hardware vendor has ever offered Linux before.

Ubuntu Founder: No Emulation Software for Dell Systems

Filed under
Ubuntu

Dell will not include open-source software such as Wine, which lets users run Windows programs on Linux, with the PCs it plans to bundle with Ubuntu Linux, Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu and its commercial sponsor Canonical, said May 3.

Six Six Sixty Four Bit

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Satanic Edition is now available for the amd64 architecture, so those of your with twice as many bits as anyone else can finally point your browsers to:

http://parker1.co.uk/ubuntu-se/installation.php

…and follow the standard installation procedure to join the rest of us in the underworld.

Don't be afraid, Linux isn't just for geeks

Filed under
Linux

It came out earlier this week that Dell will soon offer computers running Linux instead of Windows. Not all of its machines, obviously — the company wants to stay in business — but Linux will be an option on at least two desktops and one laptop models.

Linux: Debating Swap-Prefetch

Filed under
Linux

ngo Molnar reviewed Con Kolivas's swap-prefetching patches suggesting that they were ready for inclusion in the mainline kernel, "I've reviewed it once again and in the !CONFIG_SWAP_PREFETCH case it's a clear NOP, while in the CONFIG_SWAP_PREFETCH=y case all the feedback i've seen so far was positive. Time to have this upstream and time for a desktop-oriented distro to pick it up."

Mozilla CEO: Open source is no monster

Filed under
OSS

Open source is nothing to be afraid of, according to Mozilla's chief executive officer.

Mitchell Baker, speaking at CeBIT Australia 2007 in Sydney earlier this week, destroyed the perception that open-source vendors were just ad hoc organisations. Baker claimed Mozilla was not "Frankenstein", dispelling notions that code is haphazardly thrown together in open-source development.

Tories plan open door for open source

Filed under
OSS

A Tory strategy to make more use of open source software in the public sector is likely to tackle the culture of secrecy in government procurement, according to early details released to The Register.

Mugshot: Social networking open source style

Filed under
Software

Now that we have open source beer, open source cars, and open source photography, a social networking service run by Red Hat and based around open source software comes as no surprise.

Debian Etch And Xen From The Debian Repository

Filed under
HowTos

This guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an already working Debian Etch system. You can find all the software used here in the Etch repository, so no external files or compilation are needed.

Pidgin 2.0: A true polyglot

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Pidgin 2.0, the latest version of the popular open source instant messaging client formerly known as Gaim, is now available for download. After months of development and numerous beta releases, Pidgin 2.0 is finally ready.A significant improvement over the current 1.5.x series, Pidgin 2.0 includes several compelling features and usability enhancements.

The Top 15 most colorful, controversial Microsoft statements ever

Filed under
Microsoft

In the pantheon of controversial Microsoft comments CEO Steve Ballmer's quote this week about the Apple iPod: "There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It's a $500 subsidized item," ranks right up there.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel News: Linux 4.10 in SparkyLinux, Wayland 1.13.0, and Weston 2.0 RC2

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Lands in SparkyLinux's Unstable Repo, Here's How to Install It
    The trend of offering users the most recent Linux kernel release continues today with SparkyLinux, an open-source, Debian-based distribution that always ships with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and software versions. SparkyLinux appears to be the third distro to offer its users the ability to install the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel, after Linux Lite and Ubuntu, as the developers announced earlier that the Linux kernel 4.10 packages are now available from the unstable repository.
  • Wayland 1.13.0 Display Server Officially Released, Wayland 1.14 Lands in June
    Bryce Harrington, a Senior Open Source Developer at Samsung, announced today the release and general availability of the Wayland 1.13.0 for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted the next-generation display server.next-generation display server. Wayland 1.13.0 has entered development in the first days of the year, but the first Alpha build arrived at the end of January, along with the Alpha version of the Weston 2.0 compositor, including most of the new features that are present in this final release that you'll be able to install on your Linux-based operating systems in the coming days.
  • Weston 2.0 RC2 Wayland Compositor Arrives With Last Minute Fixes
    While Wayland 1.13 was released today, Bryce Harrington today opted against releasing the Weston 2.0 reference compositor and instead issue a second release candidate. Weston 2.0 is the next version of this "playground" for Wayland compositor technologies since the new output configuration API had broke the ABI, necessitating a break from the same versioning as Wayland.
  • [ANNOUNCE] weston 1.99.94

KDE Leftovers

  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience
    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora. You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?
    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea. So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.
  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral
    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.
  • Making Movies with QML
    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.
  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM
    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

SteamVR for Linux, Benchmarks of HITMAN on NVIDIA

  • SteamVR for Linux is now officially in Beta
    Valve have put up SteamVR for Linux officially in Beta form and they are keen to stress that this is a development release. You will need to run the latest Steam Beta Client for it to work at all, so be sure to opt-in if you want to play around with it.
  • Valve Publishes A SteamVR Developer Build For Linux
    Valve has begun rolling out their SteamVR Linux support by announcing today a beta/developer build of their VR support for Linux. Valve's SteamVR for Linux page was updated today to reflect the build becoming public via the Steam beta channel, "This is a development release. It is intended to allow developers to start creating SteamVR content for Linux platforms. Limited hardware support is provided, and pre-release drivers are required. Linux support is currently only available in the "beta" branch, make sure you are using SteamVR[beta] before reporting issues."
  • HITMAN Linux Benchmarks On 12 NVIDIA GPUs
    Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated port of HITMAN for Linux. While at first it didn't look like this Linux game port would work out for our benchmarking requirements, thanks to Feral it does indeed work for another interesting Linux gaming test perspective. For our initial HITMAN Linux benchmarks are tests from 12 NVIDIA GeForce GPUs while our Radeon tests will come tomorrow.

Meet Flint OS, a Chromium OS Fork for Raspberry Pi & PCs That Runs Android Apps

Will Smith from Flint Innovations Limited is informing Softpedia today about their up and coming Linux-based operating system for PCs and Raspberry Pi devices, Flint OS, based on the open-source Chromium OS project. These days, we see more and more developers and entrepreneurs launching new operating systems based on Chromium OS, which Google uses with much success for its Chrome OS on many Chromebooks that you can purchase today. But Flint OS is somehow a bit special, not only because it provides support for both Raspberry Pi SBCs and x86 computers with either Intel or Nvidia GPUs, but because it uses Android apps. Read more Also: KaOS 2017.02 Is Out with Linux 4.9.10, KDE Plasma 5.9.2, and X.Org Server 1.19.1