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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Distribution Release: SimplyMEPIS 6.5

Filed under
Linux

After three months of intensive development, Warren Woodford has announced the final release of SimplyMEPIS 6.5: "SimplyMEPIS 6.5 for 32 and 64 bit Intel and AMD based PCs and MacTels has been released by MEPIS.

MyahOS 3.0 Tech Demo 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Toward the end of last week the first tech demo for the upcoming MyahOS 3.0 was released. The Myah 3.0 Tech Demo 1 LiveCD is optimized for i686 systems and is built using the Linux-Live scripts and has a lot of new packages including the Linux 2.6.20.2 kernel, GCC 4.1.2, X.Org 7.2, and Xfce 4.4.

Linux Foundation Expands Membership

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, has announced three new members who represent the increasing opportunity for Linux as it continues to mature on devices.

What Do You Love and Hate about Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

As Ubuntu is the best thing that happened to me in the last year or so (I was a Fedora user before), I will take a moment and write this article about it.

I’m Going Back To Windows

Filed under
Linux

No. Not me personally. It’s the threat that we, as Linux users and developers, hear constantly. It’s on the forums, mailing lists and IRC. These ridiculous threats, that if something in the Linux operating system is not fixed or handled to their liking, they’re running back to Windows. To me, it seems to be getting worse and worse.

Why Linux LiveCDs are Important? How Useful are They?

Filed under
Linux

There a plenty of linux live cd, check out frozentech.com, scroll down the list and you will see this line:

Currently displaying 315 LiveCD/DVDs

With various tools such as Kadischi, linux live script, Ubuntu Customization Kit etc, you can easily come out your own live cd. What you required is just the matter of time to fine tune and customized your software included in your live cd.

Pick a License, Any License

Filed under
OSS

I hate software licenses. When I read a software license, what I see is a bunch of officious, mind-numbing lawyerly doublespeak. Blah, blah, blah.. kill me now.

How to script songs lyrics retrieval

Filed under
HowTos

I recently wrote a simple bash script to incorporate a lyrics database into some of my music-handling scripts. I took advantage of one of the benefits of open source software by finding an existing application that performed this task and inspecting the code to see how the developers did it.

Installing Beryl On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Desktop With An ATI Radeon Graphic Card

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can install and configure Beryl on an Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) desktop with an ATI Radeon graphic card. With Beryl, you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects.

Quake 4 1.4.1 Beta Available

Filed under
Gaming

The Quake 4 1.4.1 Beta patch is now available for download. We hope everyone enjoys the new content, features and fixes!

Experimental Sugar SDK LiveCD

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

I have stopped producing the LiveCD development builds to save space and time it takes to get out the daily builds. They are set to be replaced by the SDK LiveCD builds which will be built less frequently, usually during major sugar API changes and along with the stable builds. The first one is now available at

http://olpc.download.redhat.com/olpc/streams/sdk/build1/livecd/

Open XML takes next step toward becoming a standard

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft 's bid to have its Open XML file format approved as an ISO standard took another step forward Monday when that organization put the measure on a voting ballot sent to its member countries.

Red Hat spreads virtualization

Filed under
Linux

One of Red Hat Inc.'s leading Canadian partners believes the latest version of the open source server will prove to be a boon for his firm. “It think it's going to be great,” Paul Kerr, president of Toronto's Scalar Decisions, said of the release this month of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.0.

“I think it will mean a big impact for our business.”

Miguel, Mono and Microsoft

Filed under
OSS

A little over five months has gone by since the Microsoft-Novell deal was signed but some details still remain unknown.

Debates over GPLv3, Novell and Microsoft

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OSS

A post on OSNews regarding Novell's official response to the recent draft of the GPLv3 led to a discussion on the merits (or lack thereof) of the Novell-Microsoft deal. Not surprisingly, most respondents have a negative view of the agreement.

Defense kicks off open-source encryption program

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OSS

The Defense Department has launched a new program to encourage the use of open- source encryption software within DOD systems.

Software suspend under Linux

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HowTos

Suspending a computer means to turn it off in a special way, so that when you power it on again it resumes what it was doing, like nothing had happend. There are two common ways of suspending a computer: suspending to RAM and suspending to disk.

Suspend to disk

11 Things You Haven't Seen Yet in Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

A lot of websites have jumped at the chance of showing you the latest pieces of Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn. But they all have focused on the same things, the very same features that Ubuntu has touted as being the staple of Feisty Fawn. Yet there's a lot more under the hood that really makes life in Feisty a lot easier.

Open source expert speaks out on GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Mark Radcliffe joins us this week to give his expert opinion on the latest draft of GPLv3. Mark is a friend and one of the industry's premier IP attorneys, especially with open source licensing questions. He is outside counsel for the OSI and chairs Committee C in the GPLv3 drafting process.

In other words, he knows his stuff.

Memories of OS/2

Filed under
OS

OSNews reports that OS/2 is 20 years old today. Wow, that makes me feel ooooold. My first experience with OS/2 was the 2.0 version (I think) around the end of highschool. According to Wikipedia 2.0 was released in 1992, so that's about right. I think I remember going with Fred to go over to someone's house to copy it even (lots of floppy disks).

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.