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Friday, 20 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Hackers attack Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Security

telegraph.co.uk: Hackers have mounted an attack on the Large Hadron Collider, raising concerns about the security of the biggest experiment in the world as it passes an important new milestone.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 38

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #38 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Last Call for openSUSE Board Candidates, openSUSE 11.0 survey, and KDE in openSUSE 11.1 and beyond.

Does interoperability violate the GPL?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: VMWare boxes from its logoI got an e-mail this morning, tickling me to look into the idea that VMWare is violating the GPL. This idea has been around for some time and Big Money Matt has covered it beautifully.

Make Your Linux Desktop More Productive

Filed under
HowTos

lifehacker.com: Apple has convinced millions that they can make the switch from Windows to OS X, but those curious about Linux have to see for themselves if they can work or play on a free desktop. Today we're detailing a Linux desktop that helps you move quickly, work with Windows, and just get things done; read on for a few suggestions on setting it up.

Boxee aims to shake up the home theater

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Boxee is a new entrant into the increasingly crowded open source media center space. The company's eponymous application is billed as a "social media center" -- melding a smorgasbord of social networking services into an XBMC-based media center designed for the couch-centric user.

The 2008 kernel summit

Filed under
Linux

Jonathan Corbet: The agenda for the 2008 kernel summit has been posted. The summit is an annual, invitation-only event which is typically attended by 70-80 developers. It is a rare opportunity to bring part of the kernel community together for focused discussions on topics which affect the kernel as a whole.

Is Linux growing at Windows' or Unix's expense?

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Windows may be king of data centers, but Linux has a foothold in nearly every courtyard and is sure to make further inroads in the year ahead.

Mozilla Colors

Filed under
Moz/FF

bholley.wordpress: I’ve been working on getting Mozilla’s color management backend ready for the prime time. We’re finally turning it on in tonight’s nightly builds, so I thought I’d give a bit of background on the history of color management in Mozilla and on color management in general.

The open source principles of participation

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: One of the greatest and most destructive beliefs in the open source community is that "Because I'm not a programmer, I can't participate in an open source project." Let me be the first to tell you that if you believe that, you're wrong. Dead wrong.

opensuse adds Installation over serial line

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: It’s now possible to install openSUSE if you only have a serial line (without additional tricks). Our graphical bootloader frontend used to ignore serial input. That’s now (starting with 11.1 beta1) changed.

Protecting your network with Strata Guard Free

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Being connected to the Internet means exposure to what the outside world has to offer -- including the undesirable elements. Every time you connect to the Internet, you're exposed to threats that can compromise your network's security. Although network security solutions have evolved in recent years, so have network attack techniques.

Book Review: "Intellectual Property and Open Source"

Filed under
OSS

arstechnica.com: You'd have to do a lot of man-on-the-street interviews before you'd find someone who could explain the difference between a patent and a trademark. Into this void steps Van Lindberg, a former software engineer and now a lawyer who specializes in the legal issues surrounding the free software community.

Linux Foundation Expands Fellowship Program to Support Kernel Developers

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin: The Linux Foundation, in concert with several well-known industry names (hint: they start with letters like I and G), has hired a key contributor to the Linux kernel development community, the system administrator for kernel.org.

Five signs you're an e-mail addict

Filed under
Misc

itbusiness.ca: Quick: When's the last time you checked your e-mail? If you're like most Americans, the answer is likely within the last 15 minutes -- even if you're not at work.

Asia set to 'give back' to open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnetasia.com: Asia is in the middle of a mass adoption wave of open source technology, and the floodgates of innovation will open following this wave in two to three years, according to open source vendors.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OpenMoko users open up about their phones

  • The Mini 9 NetBook: Dell’s Hardware as a Service Experiment?
  • The importance of marketing to open-source projects
  • Experts Agree (On Nothing) About Intersection of Cloud And Virtualization
  • Open source after the M&A honeymoon
  • Suse Linux virtualized on Windows--why?
  • Red Hat outlook: Clouds and virtualization everywhere
  • Browser Wars
  • HowTo get Internet Explorer for Mandriva Linux
  • Aspire One: Victorian Education Discriminating Against Linux?
  • Announcing RC1 of openSUSE-Education for 11.0
  • What's 'Commercial Use' With Open Source Derivatives?
  • New Ulteo Application System coming soon
  • Ubuntu gets user interface team
  • Why isn't Ubuntu the number 1 operating system?
  • With EasyGUI, I Can Stick with Python
  • Unlimited Potential in open source software
  • Maximizing Set Match Probability Using Perl

Post-Link Optimization for Linux on POWER

Filed under
Linux

Find out about the recent updates made to the Post-Link Optimization for Linux on POWER, also known as FDPR-Pro. This technology is a performance-tuning utility used to improve the execution time and the real memory utilization of user-level application programs, based on their run-time profiles.

Viewing the Night Sky with Linux Part II: XEphem

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Part I of this series covered a simple Linux planetarium program, KStars. But there are some questions KStars isn't very good at answering. For viewing closeups of planets, monitoring the motion of the planets, getting precise predictions of events like eclipses, and other such information, you'll do better with a more powerful tool: XEphem.

Red Hat's security issue

Filed under
Linux
Security

blog.perens.com: Last month, Red Hat issued a security bulletin. Not all that went on is clear, but it seems that the servers used to develop and distribute Fedora and Red Hat were accessed by a person with criminal intent. But there are continuing problems with Red Hat's handling of the situation.

Also: Fedora and our security attitude

Mandriva One 2009 - KDE4 - RC1

Filed under
MDV

planetoss.com: Mandriva releases a new version in every six months and this time is no exception. The team released 2009 RC1 which is scheduled for a final release on 9th October. The notable improvements from the previous 2008 Spring release are,

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Civilization VI, Stardew Valley, 40 Linux Games That You Must Play in 2018

  • The Linux version of Civilization VI should get cross-platform online play in the next few weeks
    Civilization VI was recently updated to give Windows and Mac players cross-platform multiplayer, sadly the Linux version was left out. We spoke to Aspyr to confirm what's happening.
  • Stardew Valley's Multiplayer Update will be out with full Linux support on August 1st
    Not long to wait for the proper stable version of Stardew Valley's Multiplayer Update, as the developer confirmed today that it will release on August 1st.
  • 40 Linux Games That You Must Play in 2018
    The last time we compiled a list of Linux Games was back in 2017 – The 25 Best Games for Linux and Steam Machines. Since we’re in 2018 it is only fair that we compile another list Linux gamers can refer to as they prepare to storm Steam’s (and other game services’) servers. The games are listed in no particular order; And even though some of them featured on the previous list I advise you to check that one out here before proceeding.
  • Gaming on Linux – Best Sources to Download Video Games for Linux
    Video games are part of everyone’s childhood. Even youngsters love to play video games. Some people are addicted to video games so much that play for hours and hours. Well, it has been a favorite spare time since the first commercial arcade game was launched in the 1970s. According to a survey report, about 49% people in the world play video games. Now let’s get back to the main topic. Linux is getting more famous among people now. Some years back it was an operating system considered to be good for only Professionals. Now it is getting popular for normal users also. But there are some questions often asked about Linux when a windows user wants to switch to Linux. One of the most frequently asked questions is:

A Forbes Writer Spent 2 Weeks Using Ubuntu, This is What He Thought…

A classic love story — one Hollywood has yet to adapt in to major motion picture/musical starring Robert Downey Jr (I swear he’s in everything). The latest case in point? That comes courtesy of online magazine Forbes.com and its tech contributor Jason Evangelho. Jason shares his experience of using Ubuntu for a solid fortnight on a swanky Dell XPS 13 laptop. He says he was spurred into “ditching” Windows by yet another ill-timed and infuriating wait while the OS opted to install updates. “After two decades of relying on Windows I finally decided it was time for the nuclear option,” he writes. Read more

A Fresh Look At The PGO Performance With GCC 8

It's been a while since we last ran some GCC PGO benchmarks, the Profile Guided Optimizations or feedback-directed optimization technique that makes use of profiling data at run-time to improve performance of re-compiled binaries. Here are some fresh benchmarks of GCC PGO impact on a Xeon Scalable server while using the newly-released GCC 8.2 release candidate. With it being a while since our last roundabout with GCC PGO benchmarking and also a reader recently inquiring about PTS PGO testing, I ran some new tests. For those not familiar with PGO, it basically involves first compiling the code with the relevant PGO/profiling flags, running the workload under test to generate the profiling data, and then re-compiling the software while feeding that profiling data into the compiler so it can make better optimization choices. This profile-guided feedback can be quite beneficial to the compiler for making wiser code generation choices based upon that run-time data. Firefox, Chrome, and other popular software packages have been relying upon PGO-optimized release binaries for a while to offer greater performance. Read more Also: A 3.3x Performance Improvement For FLAC Audio Encoding On POWER 64-bit

Graphics: Intel/DRM-Next, ATI/AMD, and NVIDIA

  • Intel Squeezes Final Batch Of Linux 4.19 DRM Changes, Lands Icelake Display Compression
    Last week Intel sent in a "final" batch of i915 DRM driver feature updates to DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle but it turns out there is one more batch of changes now focused on landing. Intel open-source graphics driver developer Rodrigo Vivi submitted their final pull request of new material for Linux 4.19.
  • 2018 Brings A New Linux X.Org Display Driver Update For The ATI RAGE 128
    Last month I wrote about a new attempt at improving the ATI RAGE 128 X.Org driver... Yes, for the for the Rage graphics cards from the late 90's in the days of AGP and PCI where core/memory clock speeds were commonly in the double digits... If you are a hobbyist fond of these vintage graphics cards and are still running with these OpenGL 1.1~1.2 capable GPUs, there is a new X.Org driver update.
  • AMDGPU Gets More Features For Linux 4.19 Kernel
    On top of AMDGPU improvements/features already staged for Linux 4.19, the AMD folks on Thursday sent in their seemingly last set of feature updates to DRM-Next ahead of the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window. There is certainly a lot of new DRM material queuing for Linux 4.19: if you are behind on your Phoronix reading, there will be a DRM recap next week or so on Phoronix with the cutoff for new DRM-Next material hitting its end for the upcoming 4.19 window. Thursday's Radeon/AMDGPU update just adds to this big list of changes.
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Plumbs New Extensions, Lands A Number Of Fixes
    The AMD folks maintaining their official Vulkan driver code have done their common end-of-week code dump into the open-source AMDVLK Linux Vulkan driver repository across the PAL, XGL, LLVM, and SPVGEN code-bases.
  • NVIDIA 396.45 Linux Driver Fixes Vulkan Direct-To-Display & Multi-Threaded EGL Apps
    The NVIDIA Unix developers have released the 396.45 binary display driver today with just two listed bug-fixes. The NVIDIA 396.45 Linux driver has improved recovery for Vulkan direct-to-display applications (such as VR compositors or other use-cases where the Vulkan application is taking directly control of the display output) when the application hangs or crashes. This is good news in case of a problematic Linux VR experience that the display should be restored more gracefully.
  • NVIDIA pushed out two new Linux drivers recently with 396.45 and 390.77
    NVIDIA are pushing forward with improving their Linux driver in many areas, with two driver series seeing updated in the past week. The first is the 390.77 driver, part of their "long-lived branch release".