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Wednesday, 26 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Trying Out Nouveau's Accelerated Pascal Support With DRM-Next, Mesa 17.2-dev Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 5:00pm
Story Debian Shutting down public FTP services Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 4:58pm
Story 4MRecover 22.0 Linux Data Recovery Live CD Enters Beta, Includes TestDisk 7.0 Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 4:23pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 3:25pm
Story Android-x86 6.0 Gets Third Stable Update, Mesa 17.0.4 and Linux 4.4.62 LTS Added Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 12:35pm
Story OpenELEC 8.0.2 Embedded Linux Entertainment OS Is Out with Mesa 17.0.4, More Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 12:32pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 11:07am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 11:00am
Story GNOME/GTK News Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:59am
Story Containers News Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2017 - 10:53am

Linux 3.18.50

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 3.18.50 kernel.

All users of the 3.18 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 3.18.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-3.18.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

openSUSE Leap's backward version jump

Filed under
SUSE

Hi all,

On behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Management I am
pleased to announce the next version of openSUSE Leap after 42.3 will
be:

openSUSE Leap 15

As with Leap 42.x, minor releases are expected annually for at least 3
years, so you can expect a Leap 15.1 to follow, then 15.2 and onwards.

Obviously this is quite a dramatic change from the current version
number of 42.x, so I will explain what justifies this change in some
detail below.

Read more

Switch to open source model turns costs into R&D

Filed under
OSS

Public administrations that switch to an open source software model and contracting for services, also transform the costs previously spent on acquisition and maintenance into budget for research, development and innovation, says Álvaro Anguix, general manager of the gvSIG association.

Read more

German states adopt open source-based security checks system

Filed under
OSS

The German federal state of Thuringia will join North RhineWestphalia, Baden-Württemberg, Hamburg and Hesse and start using OSiP, a system for performing security checks for staff access to sensitive areas. The system, built on open source components, is set to become the default security system for all 16 federal states.

Read more

Open source group focuses on industrial IoT gateway middleware

Filed under
OSS

The Linux Foundation has launched an open source, cross-platform “EdgeX Foundry” project based on Dell’s FUSE for standardizing middleware on IoT gateways.

The new EdgeX Foundry organization will develop modular, cross-platform middleware for industrial IoT edge gateways. Based on a Dell FUSE project, the open source group aims to simplify and standardize industrial IoT edge computing “while still allowing the ecosystem to add significant value,” says the Linux Foundation.

Read more

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • GCC 6 Becoming Auxiliary Compiler In OpenIndiana

    While GCC 7 is being released in the days ahead, the OpenIndiana crew continuing to advance the open-source Solaris stack has begun offering GCC 6 as an auxiliary/supplementary compiler.

  • LLVM Still Working Towards Apache 2.0 Relicensing

    LLVM developers have been wanting to move from their 3-clause BSD-like "LLVM license" to the Apache 2.0 license with exceptions. It's been a while since last hearing about the effort while now a third round of request for comments was issued.

  • How Operation Code helps veterans learn programming skills

    After leaving the military, Army Captain David Molina knew he wanted to go into software development. As Molina did research on the field, he found himself overwhelmed by the vast amount of information and choices. For example: What coding language is the right one to learn? What language is the most valuable for being competitive in the job market? To add to the confusion, there are a myriad of for-profit code schools that are proliferating at an exponential rate, and each one advertises career outcomes for a fraction of the cost of a four-year computer science degree. Where could he turn for guidance on how to enter the tech industry?

MPV 0.25

Filed under
Movies
OSS
  • v0.25.0

    Support for some optical media functionality (DVD/CD) is now disabled by default.

  • MPV 0.25 Media Player Released With Numerous Changes

    For fans of MPV as the media player forked from MPlayer/MPlayer2, a new release was tagged this weekend.

    MPV 0.25.0 is the new release and it has a couple features to point out. Some of the prominent work for MPV 0.25 includes disabling by default some DVD/CD playback features and also relicenses a number of components under the LGPL.

  • Open source media player 'mpv' has a brand new release available

    mpv [GitHub, Official Site], a slick open source media player has seen a new release, it has re-licensed a number of components under the LGPL.

    About the re-licensing, more info can be found here. Essentially, they have turned the player into a library that other applications can use, so using the LGPL allows a bit more freedom with other licenses too that aren't directly compatible with the GPL itself.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Open Source Software: 10 Go To Solution for Small Businesses

Filed under
OSS

While closed-source operating systems such as Windows and Mac OS may still dominate the OS market, not everyone can afford the high costs that they entail. For small- and medium-sized enterprises where every penny matters, taking advantage of open-source software such as Ubuntu’s Linux is a good bet to boost productivity and cost effectiveness. The fact that open-source softwares have evolved to become somewhat user-friendly and sleek also helps a good deal.

Read more

Linux 4.11-rc8

Filed under
Linux

So originally I was just planning on releasing the final 4.11 today,
but while we didn't have a *lot* of changes the last week, we had a
couple of really annoying ones, so I'm doing another rc release
instead. I did get fixes for the issues that popped up, so I could
have released 4.11 as-is, but it just doesn't feel right.

It's not like another week of letting this release mature will really hurt.

The most noticeable of the issues is that we've quirked off some NVMe
power management that apparently causes problems on some machines.
It's not entirely clear what caused the issue (it wasn't just limited
to some NVMe hardware, but also particular platforms), but let's test
it.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.11 delayed for a week by NVMe glitches and 'oops fixes'

Linux 4.11 Pushed Back: 4.11-rc8 Released

Themes for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Flattiance is a Flat Fork of Ubuntu’s Ambiance Theme

    Flattiance is pitched as a “semi-flat fork” of the Ubuntu Ambiance theme. You know, the one that ships out of the box and by default. On the whole Flattiance keeps to the same color palette, with dark browns and orange accents, but it ditches the gradient in app headers in favour of a solid block.

  • A quick look at some essential GNOME Shell tweaks and extensions

    Now that Ubuntu is moving to GNOME Shell, many people will get a bit of a shock at how different the workflow is from Unity to Shell. Here’s a quick look at some essentials to get you going.

Graphics and Games

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Compute Shader Patches For Nouveau Pascal
  • Steam For Linux [Steam review]

    Technically, physically, mentally, chemically games are those things which make us feel like a child again. Age doesn’t matter, what matter is that spirit that is inside us, that “gamer” spirit. When I joined Linux two years ago, I installed steam firstly to get my games from windows back. Now I've got a library of limitless free and paid games having my CS: GO too. I am a daily CS: GO, player. All my favorite games are on Linux via steam. That is why I decided to review it for you guys who are new to Linux world and are in a doubt that how to use steam, what is steam? All answers are here. So here is Steam for Linux.

  • A look at Codroids, a puzzle game with a focus on simplicity

Ubuntu and elementary

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • System76 wants to build its own hardware for its Linux-based computers

    System76 is building up quite a name for itself, being one of a very limited number of companies selling only computers running Linux-based operating systems. Now the aim is to branch out; System76 wants to design and build its own hardware, while representing the open source community as it does so.

    At the moment, the hardware used in System76 systems is outsourced, but in the future this will change. The company says that it is moving into phase three of its development cycle, and this "moves product design and manufacturing in house." And you should set your expectations high: "We're about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores."

  • AppCenter Spotlight: Beta Testers

    Over the past month we’ve been beta testing the new AppCenter with a number of developers, from elementary OS contributors to backers of our Indiegogo campaign. After testing out the submission process and getting some apps into the store (and seeing rapid updates!), I wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the first apps.

  • elementary OS to get improved AppCenter, showing off a few new applications

    I have to hand it to the elementary OS guys, they have a massive focus on design and it does look quite incredible. It is easily one of the best looking Linux distributions, which I do admire. Their new AppCenter, for example, looks extremely clean and clear.

Beijing Zoo is No Place for Pandas

Filed under
Just talk

Pandas in Beijing Zoo
Photo credit: Nick Hopkins

I am a Panda lover. I work as a support engineer in an I.T company here in the United Kingdom. Most of my spare time is spent watching different Panda videos -- both old and new videos. Basically, it is my therapy; a 'stress release' for me. I find them to be adorable and precious creatures. As a matter of fact, I would like to volunteer to come to Sichuan. I want to experience and feel what it's like to be a Panda keeper, to be able to interact with them for real. The Panda is China's National Treasure, so it's a shame to watch the Panda videos from Beijing zoo, as the place is disgusting and not ideal for Pandas to live in (and for sure for all the rest of the animals who unfortunately got stuck in this prison cell).

The place looks like a ghost town. Lifeless and languished. Knowing that Pandas wear a thick fur on their body, can you imagine what it feels for them in 30C or 35C (summer temperature)? What it probably feels like all the time? Come on, if you really care, you must do something now, otherwise these Pandas will die. Please bring them back to their sanctuary where they really belong.

Linux 4.11 File-System Tests: EXT4, F2FS, XFS & Btrfs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With the Linux 4.11 kernel potentially being released as soon as today, here are some fresh benchmarks of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS on a solid-state drive and comparing the performance of 4.11 Git back to Linux 4.9 and 4.10.

For those wondering if the block/file-system changes of Linux 4.11 have any impact on EXT4/F2FS/XFS/Btrfs for common I/O workloads or how these file-systems are comparing on this latest kernel, here are some benchmarks.

Read more

KDE neon Translations

Filed under
KDE

One of the best things about making software collaboratively is the translations. Sure I could make a UML diagramming tool or whatever all by my own but it’s better if I let lots of other people help out and one of the best crowd-sourcing features of open community development is you get translated into many popular and obscure languages which it would cost a fortune to pay some company to do.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report

    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far.

    Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.

  • Galago Pro: Look Inside

    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!

  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted
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Leftovers: OSS

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