Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 02 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8.10, VirtualBox 5.1.10 Lands Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 5:04pm
Story Devuan GNU/Linux Continues Its Vision of Providing Debian Without Systemd Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 5:03pm
Story 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC hands you a sixpack of USB 3.0 Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 4:56pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 4:03pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 3:30pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 3:29pm
Story 11 wonderful wearable open source projects Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 2:38pm
Story Fedora 25 GNOME 3 screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 2:06pm
Story European Parliament: EUR 1.9M for EU-FOSSA follow-up Rianne Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 2:02pm
Story Servers/Networks Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2016 - 11:58am

NVIDIA GTX 680 To GTX 1080 Blender OpenCL Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For this article are benchmarks of 13 Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards when testing Blender 2.78's OpenCL renderer. Unfortunately, no AMD OpenCL benchmarks for Blender yet -- the current open-source stack doesn't work until ROCm OpenCL support comes into play and the AMDGPU-PRO stack wasn't working for Blender OpenCL but was falling back to CPU rendering.

Read more

Qt Creator 4.2 RC1 released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2 RC1.

Since the release of the Beta, we’ve been busy with polishing things and fixing bugs. Just to name a few:

We fixed that the run button could spuriously stay disabled after parsing QMake projects.
Qt Creator is no longer blocked while the iOS Simulator is starting up.
We added preliminary support for MSVC2017 (based on its RC).

For an overview of the new features in 4.2 please head over to the Beta release blog post. See our change log for a more detailed view on what has changed.

Read more

Also: Qt Creator 4.2 RC1 Released

First open source RISC-V chips arrive in Arduino board

Filed under
OSS

SiFive’s Arduino ready “HiFive1” dev kit features its 320MHz FE310, the first MCU using the open RISC-V ISA. Also, Samsung is rumored to be using RISC-V.

In July, San Francisco-based startup SiFive unveiled the first SoCs based on the open source RISC-V platform: A Linux-ready octa-core Freedom U500 and a FreeRTOS-based Freedom E300. Now, the company has gone to Crowd Supply to sell an open source, Arduino compatible HiFive1 development board based on the FE300 that it claims is the fastest Arduino compatible in the world, 10 times faster even than Intel’s Arduino 101.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • Outlook.com is still not functioning properly for some Microsoft punters

    Microsoft is still working to resolve "difficulties" faced by its Outlook customers, despite months of complaints about the disappearance of sent emails and 550 Errors.

    A growing number of complaints threads have been posted to Microsoft's questions page regarding Outlook after recent upgrades to the service. They both precede and follow last week's outage, which Redmond's PRs failed to explain to us.

  • OpenStack Becomes a Standard Building Block for NFV

    OpenStack is becoming the de facto standard for infrastructure orchestration for NFV deployment by leading Communications Service Providers (CSPs). CSPs are trading off the challenges of OpenStack implementations (e.g. immature technology and evolving standards) for the benefits of open source and open architectures (i.e. reduced vendor lock-in). Lack of standards for NFV management and orchestration (MANO) remains a leading impediment.

  • The Docker monitoring problem

    You have probably heard of Docker—it is a young container technology with a ton of momentum. But if you haven’t, you can think of containers as easily—configured, lightweight VMs that start up fast, often in under one second. Containers are ideal for microservice architectures and for environments that scale rapidly or release often.

    Docker is becoming such an important technology that it is likely that your organization will begin working with Docker soon, if it has not already. When we explored real usage data, we found an explosion of Docker usage in production: it has grown 5x in the last 12 months.

    Containers address several important operational problems; that is why Docker is taking the infrastructure world by storm.

    But there is a problem: containers come and go so frequently, and change so rapidly, that they can be an order of magnitude more difficult to monitor and understand than physical or virtual hosts. This article describes the Docker monitoring problem—and solution—in detail.

    We hope that reading this article will help you fall in love with monitoring containers, despite the challenges. In our experience, if you monitor your infrastructure in a way that works for containers—whether or not you use them—you will have great visibility into your infrastructure.

  • Keynote: New Requirements for Application Delivery in a Micro-services Application World
  • Kontena Introduces Production-Ready, Open Source Container and Microservices Platform

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • 7 tech advent calendars for the holiday season

    Technical advent calendars work in a similar way: Each day a new treat is revealed; sometimes it's an article explaining a new tip or technique, whereas other times the treat is an exercise to help you hone your skills. Tech advent calendars, although secular, run at the same time in the holiday season. This means they'll be kicking off on December first, giving the opportunity to learn all month long.

  • #LinuXatUNI

    This last Saturday 26th was celebrated the #LinuXatUNI event at National University of Engineering. There were more than 250 people registered, but we have only 84 attended, though. I was surprised about this! It might be the upcoming final exams at universities in Lima or the early time on weekend.

  • Keynote: Breaking Barriers: Creatively and Courageously
  • Amazon Web Services says open-source MXNet will be the ‘foundation’ of future AI services [Ed: This is openwashing of a surveillance operation]
  • How Microsoft Plans To “Mix” Ubuntu Linux And Windows 10 In Creators Update [Ed: Remember: Embrace. Extend. Extinguish. The "Microsoft loves Linux" lullaby is trying to lull and mislead us. Forgetting a 30-year pattern of Microsoft abuses.]
  • SiFive Launches Open-Source RISC-V SoC
  • IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Mozilla and NodeSource Join Forces on Node.js API; Node.js Build System will Start Producing Nightly node-chakracore Builds

    Part of Node.js Foundation’s mission is growing Node.js everywhere. The Node.js platform is already available on a variety of VMs, like Samsung’s JerryScript, a lightweight JavaScript engine for the Internet of Things. While many steps are needed to allow Node.js to work in VM environments outside of V8, the work the Node.js API working group and ChakraCore are doing are important steps to offer greater choice.

  • Open source dependency management is a balancing act

    When we started development of the Open Chemistry project we looked quite seriously at requiring C++11, and I was dissuaded at the time by several in our community. We ended up using some small parts of C++11 that could be made optional and falling back to Boost implementations/empty macro definitions. At the time I think it was perhaps a little too aggressive, but if I could go back I would have told my former self to go for it. The project was new, had few existing users, and was mainly targeting the desktop. Add to that the fact that adoption often takes a few years and there is the cost of supporting older compilers.

    [...]

    Hopefully we can maintain a good middle ground that best serves our users, and be cognizant of the cost of being too conservative or too aggressive. Most developers are eager to use the latest features, and it can be extremely frustrating to know there is a better way that cannot be employed. I think there is a significant cost to being too conservative, but I have seen other projects that update and change too aggressively lose mind share.

  • Emergency Bulletin: Firefox 0 day in the wild. What to do.

    We’re publishing this as an emergency bulletin for our customers and the larger web community. A few hours ago a zero day vulnerability emerged in the Tor browser bundle and the Firefox web browser. Currently it exploits Windows systems with a high success rate and affects Firefox versions 41 to 50 and the current version of the Tor Browser Bundle which contains Firefox 45 ESR.

    If you use Firefox, we recommend you temporarily switch browsers to Chrome, Safari or a non-firefox based browser that is secure until the Firefox dev team can release an update. The vulnerability allows an attacker to execute code on your Windows workstation. The exploit is in the wild, meaning it’s now public and every hacker on the planet has access to it. There is no fix at the time of this writing.

  • [Older] E-Voting Machines Need Paper Audits to be Trustworthy

    Election security experts concerned about voting machines are calling for an audit of ballots in the three states where the presidential election was very close: Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. We agree. This is an important election safety measure and should happen in all elections, not just those that have a razor-thin margin.

    Voting machines, especially those that have digital components, are intrinsically susceptible to being hacked. The main protection against hacking is for voting machines to provide an auditable paper trail.

  • UK.gov was warned of smart meter debacle by Cabinet Office in 2012

    The government was warned of the risks surrounding its controversial smart meter programme four years ago, according to a leaked internal report seen by The Register, but appears to have largely ignored those concerns.

    A review of the programme from March 2012 highlights the vulnerability of smart meters to cyber-attacks, and flagged estimates that the scheme could leave the taxpayer out of pocket by £4.5bn rather than save consumers cash.

    Some 53 million smart meters are due to be installed in residences and small businesses by the end of 2020 at an estimated cost of £11bn.

    So far 3.5 million have been installed. The government has said it expects the scheme will save £17bn. However, a recent delayed report found that benefits to the consumer could be much smaller than originally thought.

systemd free Linux distro Devuan releases second beta

Filed under
Debian

The self-proclaimed “Veteran Unix Admins” forking Debian in the name of init freedom have released Beta 2 of their “Devuan” Linux distribution.

Devuan came about after some users felt it had become too desktop-friendly. The change the greybeards objected to most was the decision to replace sysvinit init with systemd, a move felt to betray core Unix principles of user choice and keeping bloat to a bare minimum.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Ubuntu 17.04 ‘Zesty Zapus’ Details

Filed under
Ubuntu

GNU/Linux As An Alternative To Windows For A Small Business

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In the following article, I present a real-world case scenario as an example for setting up a small business with Linux as a desktop solution. It is presented as a single illustration of a unique case, and Linux/open source deployments will of course vary based on the number of users, business need and security requirements.

A friend recently launched her own small startup, and because she’s funding it out of her own pocket, she came to me in the early stages with questions about Windows licensing, applications, support, etc. Her primary concern was the overhead of seeding her small office with Windows and all the required application licenses needed to run a business.

Because of the nature of her startup, I suggested Linux as the standard desktop for her office. She was unsure of this choice, and some of her questions, all justified, included “I’ve heard Linux isn’t user-friendly”, and “are there viable business applications available for Linux?”

Read more

Linux Kernel 3.12.68 LTS Hits the Streets with SPARC and Networking Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Today, November 29, 2016, Linux kernel maintainer Jiri Slaby announced the release and general availability of the sixty-eighth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series.

Read more

GStreamer 1.10.2 Multimedia Framework Released to Patch Recent Security Flaws

Filed under
OSS

Today, November 29, 2016, the GStreamer development team released the second maintenance update to the stable GStreamer 1.10 series of the open-source and cross-platform pipeline-based multimedia framework used on almost all Linux-based systems.

Read more

HP5: A CMS plugin for creating HTML5 interactive content

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Before working fulltime on H5P, many of us on the Core Team were deeply involved with open source projects. Over the years we have been consulted for Drupal based projects, and we’ve always tried to contribute back to the Drupal community as much as we can. H5P is installed on over 7,000 websites. It is used by hundreds of universities, including Ivy League universities. It is being used by huge companies, including Fortune 50 companies, and other big organizations like parts of the UN.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

IoT gateway runs Linux on i.MX6UL, offers Thread and ZigBee

Filed under
Linux

NXP’s Volansys-built, highly secure “Modular IoT Gateway” reference design runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL SoC, and offers Thread, ZigBee, WiFi, and NFC.

NXP has released a Modular IoT Gateway reference design for large-node, 250+ wireless IoT networks. The gateway provides pre-integrated, tested, and RF-certified 802.15.4 mesh networking modules connected via MikroBus connectors, including Thread and ZigBee modules, and soon Bluetooth LE. Other options include an NFC chip for one-tap, no-power commissioning of IoT leaf nodes. The system also offers multiple layers of security.

Read more

GNOME Builder 3.22.3 IDE Lets You Build and Run Flatpak Apps, Supports LLVM 3.9

Filed under
GNOME

Today, November 29, 2016, the development team behind the open-source GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) software project announced the availability of version 3.22.3.

Read more

Also: Flatpak 0.6.14 Linux Application Sandboxing and Distribution Framework Out Now

Zentyal Server 5.0 and Peppermint 7 Respin

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Zentyal announces Zentyal Server 5.0, major new Linux Small Business Server release

    Zentyal today announced Zentyal Server 5.0, a major new release of the Zentyal Linux Small Business Server. Amid the generalized push for cloud, small and medium business continue requiring on-site server solutions and with this release Zentyal responds to their needs, offering an easy to use all-in-one Linux server with native compatibility with Microsoft Active Directory®.

    Zentyal Server 5.0 is based on Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and comes with the latest versions of all the integrated software. The single most important improvement Zentyal Server 5.0 introduces is the integration of the latest Samba version (Samba 4.5.1) directly from upstream. Due to the fast development of the Samba project, from this version onwards Zentyal will integrate the latest stable Samba packages available upstream. This allows quicker introduction of new Samba features, fixes and updates to Zentyal.

  • Zentyal Server 5.0 Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Adds New HTTP Proxy Module

    On November 29, 2016, the Zentyal development team proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of the Zentyal Server 5.0 Linux-based server-oriented operating system with Active Directory interoperability.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Zentyal Server 5.0 comes with the latest Open Source software and GNU/Linux technologies, including an untouched Samba 4.5.1 implementation from upstream, which puts a layer of performance to the AD (Active Directory) interoperability of the small business server.

  • Peppermint 7 Respin Released

    Team Peppermint are pleased to announce the release of the Peppermint 7 Respin, in both 32bit and 64bit editions.

  • Peppermint 7 Linux Respin ISO Image Released with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Goodies, More

    Peppermint OS developer Mark Greaves announced today, November 29, 2016, the release and immediate availability of the first ISO respin image of the Peppermint 7 Linux operating system.

    Sporting all the latest updates from the upstream repositories of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, the Peppermint-7-20161129 image is now powered by the 4.4.0-47 kernel with all the recent security patches. The new ISO also includes the HPLIP (HP Linux Imaging and Printing) software for out-of-the-box support for HP printers and scanners.

Fedora 23 Linux Reaches End of Life on December 20, 2016, Upgrade to Fedora 25

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat's Fedora Platform and Program Manager Jan Kuřík has informed the community of the Fedora Linux operating system that the Fedora 23 release is about to reach end of life soon.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Development News

  • KDevelop 5.0.3 Open-Source IDE Improves GitHub Handling Authentication, More
    The development behind the open-source and cross-platform KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) was proud to announce on the first day of December the availability of the third point release for KDevelop 5.0 stable series. KDevelop 5.0.3 arrives one and a half months after the second maintenance update, but it's a small bugfix release that attempts to patch a total of nine issues reported by users since then. However, it's a recommended update for all users. "We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.0.3, the third bugfix and stabilization release for KDevelop 5.0. An upgrade to 5.0.3 is strongly recommended to all users of 5.0.0, 5.0.1 or 5.0.2," reads the release announcement.
  • PHP 7.1.0
    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0.
  • PHP 7.1 Makes Its Debut
    This first major update to last year's huge PHP 7.0 release builds several new features on top. Introduced by PHP 7.1 is nullable types, a void return type, a iterable pseudo-type, class constant visibility modifiers, support for catching multiple exception types, and many other language enhancements plus more performance optimizations and other work.

Games for GNU/Linux

OSS Leftovers

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/48
    After releasing daily snapshots without interruption for 17 days, Tumbleweed did slow down a bit during the last week. As already mentioned in my last review, 1124 had been canceled due to an issue with sddm installing strange branding configurations. And later on, we ‘broke’ our own staging setup and needed to bootstrap a few of them, making the throughput much lower than you were used to. So, we ended up with 3 snapshots since my last review: 1125, 1128 and 1129.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 28
    November is over, Santa Claus elves start to stress and the YaST team brings you one of the last reports of 2016. Let’s see what’s new in YaSTland.