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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:05pm
Story Raspberry Pi 1 and Zero: Hands on with Manjaro ARM and PiCore Linux Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:34pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:32pm
Story Raspberry Pi 3 Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:29pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:16pm
Story Linux Kernel and Linux Event Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:05am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:03am
Story Leftovers: Software and HowTos Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:00am
Story Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 and 'Squad' Might be Coming to GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:59am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:55am

SUSE and Microsoft E.E.E.

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/02

    I hope you all ended up well fed and healthy in the new year. For the last few weeks we have seen quite a slow pace for Tumbleweed, just as pre-announced in my last review of the year 2016. We can surely expect an increased pace again as people from all around the world resume their regular life rhythms. For completeness sake I will cover in this weeks’ review not only this week, but also the few snapshots since my last review. That means, we cover 8 snapshots: from 2016: 1216, 1217, 1219, 1222 and 1226 and from 2017: 0104, 0109 and 0110. Sadly, 0111 and 0112 ran into some issues on openQA – but the issues are to most parts in the testing framework, not the product (from what we know). But not being able to fully confirm it, I did not feel comfortable releasing them into the wild onto you. After all, I know some of you are still having issues with the kernel 4.9 series (but good new on that part is on the horizon). 0112 might still cut it, if we solve the openQA issues in time.

  • Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10

    If you have been following Techworm, you will know that you can run Ubuntu Apps on Windows using Bash. Microsoft brought the fun and power of Linux to Windows 10 with Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). This allowed the Windows 10 users to run Bash on Ubuntu on Windows 10 and enjoy Ubuntu Apps without having to install the Ubuntu distro separately.

  • You can now install SUSE Linux distribution inside WSL on Windows 10
  • It's Now Possible to Use openSUSE Inside Windows 10, Here's How to Install It
  • Microsoft celebrates ChakraCore's first anniversary with an update on the road to parity on Linux [Ed: Another example of Microsoft hijacking projects' (e.g. GNU/Linux projects') names]

Top 10 Linux Server Distributions of 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

You know that Linux is a hot data center server. You know it can save you money in licensing and maintenance costs. But that still leaves the question of what your best options are for Linux as a server operating system.

We've researched, crunched the numbers and put dozens of Linux distros through their paces to compile our latest list of the top ten Linux server distributions (aka "Linux server distros") — some of which you may not be aware.

The following characteristics, in no particular order, qualified a Linux server distro for inclusion in this list: ease of installation and use, cost, available commercial support and data center reliability.

Without further ado, here are the top 10 Linux server operating systems for 2017.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Hide Complex Passwords in Plain Sight and Give Your Brain a Break

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

As far as people are concerned, there are essentially two types of passwords: the ones we can remember and the ones that are too complex for us to recall. We've learned the latter type is more secure, but it requires us to store impossible-to-memorize-password lists, creating a whole new set of problems. There are some clever tricks to help our brains out a bit, but for most of us the limit of our memory is regrettable. This tip offers a way to pull passwords from unexpected places using the Linux terminal.

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(via DMT/Linux Blog)

Updated Debian 8: 8.7 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the seventh update of its stable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that this update does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "jessie" CDs or DVDs but only to update via an up-to-date Debian mirror after an installation, to cause any out of date packages to be updated.

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Also: Debian 8.7 Jessie Released

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • A first Look at the Samsung Chromebook Plus

    Based on this video, it appears as if this Chromebook from Samsung would be a great machine with GNU/Linux installed on it.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.41 LTS Update Comes With Improved Radeon, Nouveau And Power PC

    Greg Kroah-Hartman, the Linux kernel maintainer for the stable branch gives us the impression that he doesn’t need any sleeps whatsoever as he is delivering update after updates at a timely interval. The latest update is the Linux 4.4.41 kernel and has brought Linux OS users a wide array of interesting features.

  • Kaby Lake HD Graphics 630 Appear To Be Coming Up Short On Linux

    One would think the graphics of a Core i5 7600K "Kaby Lake" processor would be faster than the Core i5 6600K "Skylake" or even a Core i5 6500, but that's not always the case with the current state of the Linux driver support for the newest-generation Intel hardware.

  • New Benchmark Test Profiles This Weekend: GIMP, Memcached, JPEG Turbo, More OpenCL
  • Discord chat and VOIP on Linux, game streaming on any device, and more

    In this open gaming roundup, we take a look at Discord, a popular chat and VOIP client among gamers which is now supported on Linux; a new Gaming as a Service platform LiquidSky; and more gaming news.

  • New Qt 5.8 rc snapshot for testing

    All known blockers should be fixed in these packages and we are targeting to release Qt 5.8.0 Tue 17th January if nothing really serious found during testing. So please inform me immediately if there is some new blocker in the packages.

  • Qt 5.8 Hoping To Release Next Week, Last Minute Test Builds

    Qt 5.8.0 will hopefully be released in the days ahead.

    The Qt Company has issued new Qt 5.8.0 release candidate snapshots this week for testing. The developers believe all official blocker bugs should be fixed with this release but are encouraging last minute testing. If nothing major is discovered, Qt 5.8.0 will be released next week on 17 January.

    Those wanting to test what could be the final builds of Qt 5.8 can find them via this Qt mailing list post. Since then some bugs have been pointed out, but it's not clear yet if they'll be promoted to being blocker bugs and thereby potentially delaying next week's release.

  • AryaLinux 2017 - Release Notes

    AryaLinux 2017 comes with package updates, the latest Linux kernel and updated build scripts to build system from scratch. Here are the features of this release...

  • AryaLinux 2017 is now available for public

    AryaLinux is an Indian Linux distribution which is made using Linux From Scratch guide. This distribution uses alps as package management. Few hours ago Arya team released AryaLinux 2017 in Xfce and MATE editions. There are various changes made in this release and lots of new updates are included too.

    According to official announcement, AryaLinux will be released in 64-bit only from now on. So guys if you want to test this distro then you better have newer hardware. Linux kernel is updated to 4.9. Mate is now updated to 1.17. LibroOffice is updates to 5.2.3. Simple screen recorder is returned with Qt5. Parole and Exaile are made default media and audio player respectively.

  • What Are the Numbers Saying About: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Upgraded at Vetr Inc.
  • Debian 8 kernel security update

    There are a fair number of outstanding security issues in the Linux kernel for Debian 8 "jessie", but none of them were considered serious enough to issue a security update and DSA. Instead, most of them are being fixed through the point release (8.7) which will be released this weekend. Don't forget that you need to reboot to complete a kernel upgrade.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Rust severely disappoints me

    I wanted to like Rust. I really did. I’ve been investigating it for months, from the outside, as a C replacement with stronger correctness guarantees that we could use for NTPsec.

    I finally cleared my queue enough that I could spend a week learning Rust. I was evaluating it in contrast with Go, which I learned in order to evaluate as a C replacement a couple of weeks back.

  • Oviedo university studies to increase open source

    The University of Oviedo in Asturias, one of Spain’s autonomous communities, is studying ways to increase its use of free and open source software, reports La Nueva España, a newspaper. Using free and open source software will help to avoid the use of unlicensed software, the university management is quoted as saying in December.

    The university is also looking into using free software solutions to reduce academic plagiarism.

    The newspaper notes how Asturia’s one and only university is at the bottom end of the annual ranking of universities that use free software (Ranking de Universidades en Software Libre, RuSL.

  • There's A New Port Of RISC-V For GCC

    For those following the progress of the RISC-V open-source and royalty-free processor ISA, a new port of the GNU Compiler Collection for this architecture is now available.

    Palmer Dabbelt of UC Berkeley previously mentioned a few months ago their GCC RISC-V code was held up due to university lawyers due to upstream GCC contributions requiring copyright assignment to the Free Software Foundation, which upset the university. But it seems they're past that now as Palmer announced this week the new RISC-V port for GCC.

Security Leftovers (Back Doors in WhatsApp/Facebook and Microsoft Windows)

Filed under
Security
  • The eight security backdoors that helped kill faith in security

    With the news of WhatsApp's backdoor granting Facebook and government agencies access to user messages, fears over users' privacy issues are sure to be at an all-time high for WhatsApp's 1 billion users.

    Backdoors in computing equipment are the stuff of legend. A decade ago a security expert informed me with absolute certainty that a prominent non-US networking company had designed them into its products for years as a matter of course as if nobody much cared about this fact. Long before the average citizen had heard the letters NSA, it struck me at the time as extraordinary suggestion. It was almost as if the deliberate compromise of an important piece of network equipment was a harmless novelty.

  • Reported “backdoor” in WhatsApp is in fact a feature, defenders say

    The Guardian roiled security professionals everywhere on Friday when it published an article claiming a backdoor in Facebook's WhatsApp messaging service allows attackers to intercept and read encrypted messages. It's not a backdoor—at least as that term is defined by most security experts. Most would probably agree it's not even a vulnerability. Rather, it's a limitation in what cryptography can do in an app that caters to more than 1 billion users.

    At issue is the way WhatsApp behaves when an end user's encryption key changes. By default, the app will use the new key to encrypt messages without ever informing the sender of the change. By enabling a security setting, users can configure WhatsApp to notify the sender that a recently transmitted message used a new key.

    Critics of Friday's Guardian post, and most encryption practitioners, argue such behavior is common in encryption apps and often a necessary requirement. Among other things, it lets existing WhatsApp users who buy a new phone continue an ongoing conversation thread.

  • Security flaw leaves WhatsApp messages susceptible to man-in-the-middle attacks

    FLAWS in the way that WhatsApp deals with encryption keys leaves users wide open to man-in-the-middle attacks, enabling third-parties to tap their communications.

    The flaw has been described as a "security back door" by The Guardian and privacy campaigners (not unlike the back doors that governments of various stripes have been trying to mandate on all internet communications by law), but more sobre voices have described it as a minor bug and criticised The Guardian for going OTT.

    Nor is it new. Vulnerabilities in key handling were first discovered by German computer scientist Tobias Boelter in April 2016.

    The security flaw relates to situations where encryption keys are dropped and have to be re-issued and re-sent. In certain circumstances, a third-party could exploit the bug to persuade the app to resend messages because the authenticity of re-issued keys is not verified in WhatsApp by default.

  • There's No Security Backdoor in WhatsApp, Despite Reports

    This morning, the Guardian published a story with an alarming headline: “WhatsApp backdoor allows snooping on encrypted messages.” If true, this would have massive implications for the security and privacy of WhatsApp’s one-billion-plus users. Fortunately, there’s no backdoor in WhatsApp, and according to Alec Muffett, an experienced security researcher who spoke to Gizmodo, the Guardian’s story is “major league fuckwittage.”

  • WhatsApp vulnerability allows snooping on encrypted messages

    A security vulnerability that can be used to allow Facebook and others to intercept and read encrypted messages has been found within its WhatsApp messaging service.

    Facebook claims that no one can intercept WhatsApp messages, not even the company and its staff, ensuring privacy for its billion-plus users. But new research shows that the company could in fact read messages due to the way WhatsApp has implemented its end-to-end encryption protocol.

  • Hacker group Shadow Brokers retires, dumps more code as parting gift

    The Shadow Brokers claimed to have held even more valuable cyber tools in reserve and offered to sell them to the highest bidder in an unorthodox public auction. On Thursday, they said their sales effort had been unsuccessful and were therefore ceasing operations. “So long, farewell peoples. The Shadow Brokers is going dark, making exit,” the group said according to a screenshot of the webpage posted Thursday on the news website CyberScoop.

  • Suspected NSA tool hackers dump more cyberweapons in farewell

    The hacking group that stole cyberweapons suspected to be from the U.S. National Security Agency is signing off -- but not before releasing another arsenal of tools that appear designed to spy on Windows systems.

  • Shadow Brokers announce retirement, leak NSA Windows Hacking tools as parting gift
  • The Shadow Brokers Leaves the Stage with a Gift of So-Called NSA-Sourced Hacking Tools
  • Shadow Brokers group bids adieu, dumps hacking tools before going silent
  • 'It Always Being About Bitcoins': Shadow Brokers Retire
  • Hacking Group 'ShadowBrokers' Release NSA Exploits, Then Go Dark

Microsoft Windows Runs Under Windows

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Linux Arrives On Windows 10

    Sr. Product Manager SUSE Linux Enterprise SUSE, Hannes Kühnemund, has written a blog post and described how to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 on Windows 10. Now, by running simple commands, the users can install SUSE Linux distributions in Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). The company has also prepared a detailed blog post and described the whole procedure. For those who don’t know, by default, Microsoft enabled Ubuntu within WSL.

  • OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

    This is the first in a weekey series I'm calling ‘weekly roundup’ in which I will highlight some of the hottest stories of the week from the world of Linux and open source. This week, I want to call your attention to some excciting Windows 10/openSUSE news and alert you to a backdoor vulnerability in WhatsApp that allows messages to be intercepted.

Blob-less Raspberry Pi Linux Is A Step Closer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi single board computer has been an astounding success since its launch nearly five years ago, to the extent that as of last autumn it had sold ten million units with no sign of sales abating. It has delivered an extremely affordable and pretty powerful computer into the hands of hobbyists, youngsters, hackers, engineers and thousands of other groups, and its open-source Raspbian operating system has brought a useful Linux environment to places we might once have thought impossible.

The previous paragraph, we have to admit, is almost true. The Pi has sold a lot, it’s really useful and lots of people use it, but is Raspbian open-source? Not strictly. Because the Broadcom silicon that powers the Pi has a significant amount of proprietary tech that the chipmaker has been unwilling to let us peer too closely at, each and every Raspberry Pi operating system has shipped with a precompiled binary blob containing the proprietary Broadcom code, and of course that’s the bit that isn’t open source. It hasn’t been a problem for most Pi users as it’s understood to be part of the trade-off that enabled the board’s creators to bring it to us at an affordable price back in 2012, but for open-source purists it’s been something of a thorn in the side of the little board from Cambridge.

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FESCo Approves More Feature Changes For Fedora 26

Filed under
Red Hat

The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved more features for Fedora 26 at Friday's meeting.

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Tired of Windows? Switching to Linux Will Be Easy If You Know This

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Linux sounds intimidating, but it’s essentially just another operating system. When you buy a pre-built PC, it arrives with an operating system pre-installed, usually Windows or Mac. But Linux distros such as Ubuntu are just as capable as Windows.

The process of installing Linux is rather simple. But actually using Linux is a bit different. There are many incentives for migrating from Windows to Linux. For instance, Linux variants often use less RAM or offer a lightweight environment.

Overall, there’s simply more choice. If you’re tired of Windows, switching to Linux will be pretty easy if you know these things.

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New User Distros, Powered By Linux, No Opera for You

Filed under
-s

There are many companies who use or offer Linux and today Linux and Ubuntu rounded up 10 of the biggest. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen offered his suggestions for which distros might suite particular users of certain other operating systems. From Windows 7 to Mac, he found an Ubuntu-derivative for each. Yep, "there's a distribution for everyone," as long as it's Ubuntu. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that Opera won't be providing new conceptual browser to Linux users, because they claim it's being developed "just for fun." Remember who else once said that? In other news, Canonical today plugged Dell's new Ubuntu laptops, Ubuntu Budgie announced a wallpaper contest, and MakeUseOf made use of Linux versus Windows today to illustrate how easy it can be to switch.

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What Is Conky And How To Configure Conky On Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
Linux

Conky is a free system monitor tool for the X window system on Linux. It is able to monitor many system variables including CPU status, swap space, temperatures, disk storage, processes, network interfaces, battery status and a host of others and then display the information on your desktop. It can also display other things like time, calendars weather and the like. All these are available via themes with which Conky works.

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more

Debian vs. Ubuntu Standoff – Comparing the Top Linux Solutions

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu both have fan bases that continue to advocate the superiority of their selected solution, but what is really different between them? In this article we will take a look at how both Debian and Ubuntu have been maintaining a steady position since the early days and how even to this day they are regarded as top solutions that provide some of the most trustworthy, efficient services.

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Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Friday
  • New Windows backdoor targets intelligence gathering

    New versions of the MM Core Windows backdoor are being used to provide a channel into victims' machines for the purpose of intelligence gathering, according to Carl Leonard, principal security analyst at Forcepoint Security Labs.

    The new versions were found by members of the Forcepoint investigations team.

    MM Core, which is also known as BaneChant, is a file-less advanced persistent threat which is executed in memory by a downloaded component. It was first reported in 2013 with the version 2.0-LNK and used the tag BaneChant in the network request sent to its command-and-control centre.

    A second version, 2.1-LNK, found shortly thereafter, had the network tag StrangeLove.

    Forcepoint researchers Nicholas Griffin and Roland Dela Paz, whose write-up on MM Core was provided to iTWire, said the two new versions they had found were 2.2-LNK (network tag BigBoss) and 2.3-LNK (SillyGoose).

  • Implementing Medical Device Cybersecurity: A Two-Stage Process

    Connectivity is ubiquitous – it’s moved beyond an overhyped buzzword and become part of life. Offering ever-advancing levels of access, control, and convenience, widespread connectivity also increases the risk of unauthorised interference in our everyday lives.

    In what many experts believe was a world first, manufacturer Johnson & Johnson recently issued a warning to patients on a cyber-vulnerability in one of its medical devices. The company announced that an insulin pump it supplies had a potential connectivity vulnerability. The wireless communication link the device used contained a potential exploit that could have been used by an unauthorised third party to alter the insulin dosage delivered to the patient.

  • Dockerfile security tuneup

    I recently watched 2 great talks on container security by Justin Cormack from Docker at Devoxx Belgium and Adrian Mouat from Container Solutions at GOTO Stockholm. We were following many of the suggestions but there was still room for improvement. So we decided it was good time to do a security tuneup of our dockerfiles.

  • FTC Sues D-Link For Pretending To Give A Damn About Hardware Security

    If you've been paying attention, you've probably noticed that the so-called Internet of Things isn't particularly secure. Hardware vendors were so excited to market a universe of new internet-connected devices, they treated things like privacy, security, and end-user control as afterthoughts. As a result, we've now got smart TVs, smart tea kettles, WiFi-connected barbies and all manner of other devices that are not only leaking private customer data, but are being quickly hacked, rolled into botnets, and used in historically unprecedented new, larger DDoS attacks.

    This isn't a problem exclusive to new companies breaking into the IoT space. Long-standing hardware vendors that have consistently paid lip service to security are fueling the problem. Asus, you'll recall, was dinged by the FTC last year for marketing its routers as incredibly secure, yet shipping them with easily-guessed default username/login credentials and cloud-based functionality that was easily exploitable.

    The FTC is back again, this time suing D-Link for routers and video cameras that the company claimed were "easy to secure" and delivered "advanced network security," yet were about as secure as a kitten-guarded pillow fort. Like Asus, D-Link's hardware also frequently ships with easily-guessed default login credentials. This frequently allows "hackers" (that term is generous since it takes just a few keystrokes) to peruse an ocean of unsecured cameras via search engines like Shodan, allowing them to spy on families and businesses in real time.

Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • SteamVR support for Linux looks like it's getting close

    Thanks to a Twitter tip we have word that it looks as if SteamVR support for Linux might finally be close.

  • Valve May Be Moving Closer With Their VR Linux Support

    It looks like Valve may be moving closer to debut their Linux VR support, which they demonstrated at the 2016 Dev Days and we've known they've been working on further -- including improvements to AMDGPU/RadeonSI/RADV.

  • Early Access survival game 'Rust' gains Vulkan support in a pre-release

    When they do manage to get it fixed up enough to run on Linux, I will give it a go and note some thoughts on it.

  • Rust Game Now Supports Vulkan Renderer

    Not to be confused with Rustlang, the game called Rust now has a Vulkan renderer enabled.

    For those unfamiliar with this early-access game on Steam, as self-described on its product page, "The only aim in Rust is to survive. To do this you will need to overcome struggles such as hunger, thirst and cold. Build a fire. Build a shelter. Kill animals for meat. Protect yourself from other players, and kill them for meat. Create alliances with other players and form a town. Whatever it takes to survive."

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?