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Wednesday, 21 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CA confirms plans for open source patent pledge srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:06pm
Story Intel PR Department Hard at Work srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:08pm
Story ChoicePoint was victim of ID theft in '02 srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 4:25pm
Story amoroK LiveCD srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Story Gentoo Linux 2005.0 Security Rebuild srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 11:25pm
Story Hacker taps into business school files" srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:11pm
Story Judge hits amazon.com with fine srlinuxx 04/03/2005 - 2:46pm
Story One in four 'touched' by ID fraud srlinuxx 2 04/03/2005 - 5:03pm
Story Big Brother is Watching your Toyota Sienna srlinuxx 1 05/03/2005 - 4:17am
Story Limp Bizkit lead claims hackers stole his sex video srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 4:43am

SuiteCRM 7.10 Released

Filed under
OSS
  • SuiteCRM 7.10 released

    SalesAgility, the creators and maintainers of SuiteCRM, are excited to announce a new major release of the world’s most popular open source CRM – SuiteCRM 7.10, including highly anticipated new features and many enhancements.

    SuiteCRM is a fully featured, highly flexible, open source CRM, which can be installed on-premise or in the cloud, and allows companies and organisations to have full control over their own customer data. It delivers actionable insights into customers, boosts conversions, helps increase sales, bolsters customer care and streamlines business operations. The CRM is as powerful as Salesforce and Dynamics, but with the unique benefit of being completely open source.

  • SuiteCRM 7.10 released

    SuiteCRM is a fork of the formerly open-source SugarCRM customer relationship management system.

  • SuiteCRM 7.10 Released For Open-Source Customer Relationship Management

    SuiteCRM 7.10 is now available as the latest major feature release to this customer relationship management (CRM) software forked from SugarCRM's last open-source release.

  • How startups and SME’s can leverage open source CRM to increase business

    Prominent Open Source CRM in India:

    – SugarCRM
    Founded in 2004, Sugar CRM has over 7,000 customers and more than half a million users worldwide. Easily one of the largest open sources CRM in the world, SugarCRM offers versatile functionalities including sales-force automation, marketing campaigns, customer support, collaboration, Mobile CRM, Social CRM and reporting. While SugarCRM has released no open source editions since early 2014, its earlier community versions continued to inspire other open source software, namely Suite CRM, Vtiger CRM and SarvCRM.

    – SuiteCRM
    Suite CRM is a popular fork of SugarCRM and was launched as the latest version of the SugarCRM in October 2013. In a short period of its existence, it has won several awards and has been adopted by reputed clientele, including the Govt. of UK’s National Health Scheme (NHS) program. Suite CRM is an enterprise-class open source alternative to proprietary alternatives and offers a series of extension for both free and paid-for enhancements. Prominent additional modules available with SuiteCRM include Teams security, Google Maps, Outlook Plugin, Products, Contracts, Invoices, PDF Templates, workflow, reporting and Responsive Theme.

Open source intelligent solutions to transform work, businesses

Filed under
OSS

New trends are opening up new opportunities and new ways to deal with IT, according to Thomas di Giacomo, SUSE CTO, speaking at the SUSE executive roundtable, which the open source company hosted in partnership with ITWeb last week.

There are many new and innovative technologies that can help IT leaders meet these new demands, he added. Open source based technologies have become the driving force behind most of the technologically disruptive innovations, said Di Giacomo.

"It is pretty clear that all the new innovation is coming from open source.

"For example, open source progress with Linux and virtualisation a couple of decades ago, cloud in the last 10 years, and more recently, containers for applications, software-defined infrastructure, and platform-as-a-service, empowering DevOps principles."

However, these trends also present some new challenges, said Di Giacomo. Compared to a couple of decades ago, the number of open source projects today has skyrocketed - from hundreds in the different foundations like the Linux Foundation, Apache, Eclipse and others, to millions of projects on Github.

Read more

today's lefftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words

    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.

  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People

    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.

  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through

    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse.

    I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.

  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018

    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.

  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft

    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh!

    [...]

    I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.

  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.

Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime

Filed under
Security
  • Highlights of the French cybersecurity strategy

    First, the document describes that in France cyberdefence and cyberoffence are separated. This is directly opposed to the models employed in Anglo-Saxon countries. But it’s shown as an asset. Key argument: it respects freedoms and civil liberties.

    The document then lists the six general objectives of cyberdefence, namely: prevention, anticipation, protection, detection, attribution, reaction (remediation). The strategy itself is complete, it focuses on civil, military, domestic, external, and international levels. Let’s say it’s a rarity in the business in strategic cybersecurity documents.

    [...]

    The strategy then mentions that one of the solutions could be to release source code and documentation after an end of support date.

  • The Munich Security Conference 2018

    Over the past five decades, the Munich Security Conference (MSC) has become the major global forum for the discussion of security policy. Each February, it brings together more than 450 senior decision-makers from around the world, including heads-of-state, ministers, leading personalities of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as high ranking representatives of industry, media, academia, and civil society, to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.

  • Smart meters could leave British homes vulnerable to cyber attacks, experts have warned

    New smart energy meters that the Government wants to be installed in millions of homes will leave householders vulnerable to cyber attacks, ministers have been warned.

  • MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime: Researchers nail exploits

    "The flaws—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—are in chips made by Intel and other major suppliers. They can allow hackers to steal data from the memory of running apps, including password managers, browsers and emails."

    The authors of the paper on arXiv, Caroline Trippel, Daniel Lustig, and Margaret Martonosi, discuss a tool they developed for "automatically synthesizing microarchitecture-specific programs capable of producing any user-specified hardware execution pattern of interest."

    They said they show "how this tool can be used for generating small microarchitecture-specific programs which represent exploits in their most abstracted form—security litmus tests."

How Linux became my job

Filed under
Linux

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux.

Read more

Linux 4.16-rc2

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Linux

It's been a quiet week, and rc2 is out.

I take the fairly quiet rc be a good sign for 4.16, but honestly, rc2
is often fairly calm. That's probably because people are taking a
breather after the merge window, but also simply because it might take
a while to find any issues.

But let's be optimistic, and just assume - at least for now - that
it's because all is well.

The diffstat is fairly odd, but that often happens with small rc's
just because then just a couple of pulls will skew things easily in
one or two directions. This time the patch is about one third
architecture updates (arm64, x86, powerpc), one third tooling (mostly
'perf') and one third "rest". And yes, the bulk of that rest is
drivers (gpu, nvme, sound, misc), but those drivers are still
distinctly *not* the bulk of the whole patch.

Go out and test, it all looks fine.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.16-rc2 Kernel Released

OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

Filed under
OSS
  • OSM in IkiWiki

    Since about 15 years ago, I have been thinking of creating a geo-referenced wiki of pubs, with loads of structured data to help searching. I don't know if that would be useful for anybody else, but I know I would use it!

    Sadly, the many times I started coding something towards that goal, I ended blocked by something, and I keep postponing my dream project.

  • Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

    That said, while I still believe in the goals of OpenStreetMap, I feel the OpenStreetMap project is currently unable to fulfill that mission due to poor technical decisions, poor political decisions, and a general malaise in the project. I'm going to outline in this article what I think OpenStreetMap has gotten wrong. It's entirely possible that OSM will reform and address the impediments to its success- and I hope it does. We need a Free as in Freedom geographic dataset.

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface.

Read more

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

Filed under
GNOME
  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)

    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.

  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world

    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.

  • Introducing deviced

    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices.

    Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

Filed under
KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi

    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.

  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!

    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks.

    One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding!

    Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

Filed under
Software
  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level

    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out.

    GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.

  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment

    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.

  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

Filed under
OSS
  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?

    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.

  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships

    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Review: DietPi 6.1

Filed under
Reviews

DietPi makes it extremely easy to turn a single board computer into many different things. Installing and configuring Nextcloud, Kodi, etc., only require a few very basic steps. Every software package I tried installed with few issues, and worked great once installed. DietPi does almost all the hard work for the user, which makes it a great option for running on any single board computer or as a virtual machine. If you are looking for a lightweight and easy-to-use operating system for your single board computer, you cannot go wrong with DietPi.

Read more

Google, Windows and Outlook

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
  • Google's Octopus Is A Gemini Lake Chromebook

    While we're still waiting on an AMD-powered Chromebook as well as for Cannonlake to materialize, it appears Google is prepping support for a Geminilake Chromebook as well.

    Gemini Lake was launched back in December and makes use of Goldmont Plus CPU cores with Gen9 (Kabylake) class graphics. The current Gemini Lake mobile parts are the Celeron N4000/N4100 and Pentium Silver N5000. The Celeron models are dual core while the Pentium Silver N5000 is quad-core, all of them have a 6 Watt TDP, 1.1GHz base frequency, and turbo frequency in the 2.4~2.7GHz range while the graphics clock up only to 650~750MHz.

  • Windows 10 Update KB4058043 Causing BSODs, Some PCs Unable to Boot

    Botched updates keep making the rounds these days, and here’s a new one that was actually released in December, but whose effects haven’t been spotted until this month.

    Windows 10 update KB4058043, which is released to systems running the Fall Creators Update, brings reliability improvements to the Microsoft Store and fixes an issue which Microsoft says could cause app update failures and unnecessary network requests.

    But as it turns out, it also brings new problems to a number of systems installing it. A post on Microsoft’s Community forums, which got pinned earlier this week – meaning that it’s really an issue that all users should be aware of, reveals that Windows 10 update KB4058043 caused BSODs on a system before eventually pushing it to an unbootable state.

  • A Life Lesson in Mishandling SMTP Sender Verification

    Whenever I encounter incredibly stupid and functionally destructive configuration errors like this I tend to believe they're down to simple incompetence and not malice.

    But this one has me wondering. If you essentially require incoming mail to include the contents of spf.outlook.com (currently no less than 81 subnets) as valid senders for the domain, you are essentially saying that only outlook.com customers are allowed to communicate.

    If that restriction is a result of a deliberate choice rather than a simple configuration error, the problem moves out of the technical sphere and could conceivably become a legal matter, depending on what outlook.com have specified in their contracts that they are selling to their customers.

Graphics: Nouveau, Mesa and VESA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nouveau Gets ARB_bindless_texture Support For Maxwell & Newer

    Back for Mesa 18.0 there was OpenGL bindless textures for Kepler GPUs on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver while now for Mesa 18.1 that support is in place for Maxwell GPUs and newer.

    Bindless texture support is important for "AZDO" purposes for approaching zero driver overhead with OpenGL. ARB_bindless_texture reduces the API/GL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing textures without needing to first bind/re-bind them.

  • Marek Working Towards Even Lower SGPR Register Usage

    Yesterday well known open-source AMD developer Marek Olšák landed his RadeonSI 32-bit pointers support for freeing up some scalar general purpose registers (SGPRs) and he's continued with a new patch series to alleviate register usage even more.

  • Libdrm 2.4.90 Released With Meson Build System, AMDGPU & Intel Improvements

    Marek Olšák on Saturday released the big libdrm 2.4.90 DRM library update that sits between Mesa and other GPU user-space components and the kernel's Direct Rendering Manager code.

  • Mesa Git Lands RadeonSI 32-bit Pointers Support

    At the start of the new year Marek Olšák of AMD posted a set of patches for 32-bit GPU pointers in RadeonSI. That work has now landed in mainline Mesa Git.

  • xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0

    Nothing terribly exciting, but enough bug fixes to justify a release.

  • VESA X.Org Driver Sees First Update In Three Years

    Should you find yourself using the xf86-video-vesa DDX for one reason or another, a new release is now available and it's the first in three years.

    The xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0 X.Org driver was released this week with the handful of commits that came in since v2.3.4 was tagged three years ago, it's been eight years already since xf86-video-vesa 2.3.0. For most users, xf86-video-vesa is just used in select fallback instances when your main DDX driver fails but even still these days KMS is pretty solid with xf86-video-modesetting, fbdev and other DDX drivers working well, etc.

Kernel: VGA_Switcheroo, Con Kolivas/MuQSS, and KPTI Protection

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu: Unity, Mir, and Snapd

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Touch Q&A 23

    The developers have been hard at work on Xenial!

    ARM64 now working on Ubuntu Touch, and applications launch! As many modern CPUs don't include 32-bit compatibility mode, ARM64 native mode on UT can start to make use of more modern CPUs.

  • UBports Continues Working On Unity 8, Developer ISO Coming

    While Canonical is no longer involved in Unity 8 development, the community-driven UBports team continues working on their "Unity 8" and "Ubuntu Touch" efforts with a hope to deliver a developer ISO soon.

    Sadly the Yunit project that also forked Unity 8's code-base doesn't seem to be active at least not regularly anymore, but the UBports team is working on delivering. In their latest Q&A session they share that Unity 8 on the desktop is coming together. One of the developers commented, "While it's both good and pretty, it's not 'pretty good'."

  • This Week In Mir (16th Feb, 2018)
  • Snapd 2.31 Better Supports Wayland Via Mir, Canonical Hires Another Mir Developer

    Besides Mir 0.30 being released this week, other Mir progress was also made by these Canonical developers working on forging Mir into a viable Wayland compositor.

    Gerry Boland of Canonical's Mir team has shared that Snapd 2.31 now supports any Snap implementing the Wayland interface. This allows for Mir to be shipped as a Snap and support Wayland clients using Canonical's app sandboxing approach alternative to Flatpaks.

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OSS Leftovers

  • QMO: Firefox 59 Beta 10 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – February 16nd – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 59 Beta 10. Thank you Mohammed Adam, Abhishek Haridass,  Fahima Zulfath A. and  Surentharan.R.A. from  India QA Community team for helping us make Mozilla a better place.
  • Bugzilla Triage Helper
    There are an awful lot of bugs filed against Firefox and all it's components in the course of a release. Keeping on top of that is hard and some teams have adopted some policies to help with that (for example see: design-decision-needed). Having a consistent approach to bugs across the organisation makes it a little easier for everyone to get a feel for what's going.
  • Alfresco Founder: Commercial Open Source is more than Old Stuff for Free
    February sees Open Source turn 20 years old. Or the OSI definition at least. According to the OSI, the term was coined in Palo Alto by nanotechnologist Christine Peterson during a meeting on February 3rd, 1998 shortly after the announcement of the release of Netscape’s source code.
  • EOH and LSD Information Technology partner to lead open source in Africa
    By identifying global trends and local needs, EOH is able to proactively source and secure capabilities that will assist with the adoption of the digital revolution. LSD’s offerings across Linux, automation, devops and containers is a great technology fit for EOH to lead open source in the market.
  • Choosing a tool to track and mitigate open source security vulnerabilities
    Continuously tracking your application’s dependencies for vulnerabilities and efficiently addressing them is no simple feat. In addition, this is a problem shared by all, and is not an area most companies would consider their core competency. Therefore, it is a great opportunity for the right set of tools to help tackle this concern.
  • Open source software: to be celebrated or cursed?
    The use of Open Source Software (OSS) has become widespread. The latest statistics show that 78% of companies run OSS, and a number of mainstream software and hardware products are based on the OSS model – for example Android, Skype [sic], Firefox, Amazon Kindle, Tivo and BT Home Hub.
  • Marshall Students Use Open Source Data to Help Stop Sex Trafficking Cases
    The work involved sex trafficking cases in Latin America, the Caribbean and Southeast Asia. Select students in Marshall’s Open Source Intelligence Exchange program worked to provide open source intelligence collection and analysis for law enforcement and other clients. Open source refers to data collection from publicly available sources.
  • Stanford scholar celebrates Western culture’s open-access tradition
    The move toward “open access” to research and scholarship, far from being a modern digital-age creation, has roots in the West that date back to medieval times, writes a Stanford education scholar. John Willinsky’s new book explains how learning has long benefited from efforts to increase its circulation.

Events: OpenStack Summit Vancouver, IBM Index, Eclipse CheConf 2018

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver '18: Vote for Speakers
    The next OpenStack Summit takes place again in Vancouver (BC, Canada), May 21-25, 2018. The "Vote for Presentations" period started. All proposals are up for community votes. The deadline for your vote is will end February 25 at 11:59pm PST (February 26th at 8:59am CET)
  • IBM Index: A Community Event for Open Source Developers
    The first-ever INDEX community event, happening now in San Francisco, is an open developer conference featuring sessions on topics including artificial intelligence, machine learning, analytics, cloud native, containers, APIs, languages, and more.
  • Eclipse CheConf 2018 – Join the live stream February 21st at 10 am EST
    2017 was a fantastic year for the Che project, with more contributors, more commits, and more usage – this solidified Che’s position as the leading developer workspace server and browser IDE. Eclipse Che users logged over 7 million hours of public Che usage (plus more in private installs). We’ll discuss the growing cloud development market, Che’s position in it, and the exciting changes we’re planning for 2018.

Kernel News and Linux Foundation

  • Linux Kernel Module Growth
    The Linux kernel grows at an amazing pace, each kernel release adds more functionality, more drivers and hence more kernel modules. I recently wondered what the trend was for kernel module growth per release, so I performed module builds on kernels v2.6.24 through to v4.16-rc2 for x86-64 to get a better idea of growth rates...
  • A Linux Kernel Driver Is Being Worked On For Valve's Steam Controller
    Right now to make most use of the Steam Controller on Linux you need to be using the Steam client while there have been independent user-space programs like SC-Controller to enable Steam Controller functionality without the Steam client running. A new and independent effort is a Linux kernel driver for the Steam Controller. Through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been developing a kernel driver for the Valve Steam Controller. This driver supports both USB cable and USB wireless adapters for the Steam Controller. This driver is being developed as a proper HID kernel driver so it should work with all existing Linux programs and doesn't require the use of the proprietary Steam client.
  • AT&T Puts Smart City IoT 'Edge' Computing On Direct Dial
  • Linux Foundation, AT&T Launch Akraino

Red Hat News and New Fedora 27 Live ISOs