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Sunday, 15 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry A Fishy Tale harshasrisri 01/05/2011 - 2:11pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 11.10: Screenshot preview finid 11/07/2011 - 8:09am
Blog entry Mandriva Desktop 2011 teaser finid 1 05/07/2011 - 2:40am
Blog entry Mozilla forms partnership with Tylenol Texstar 02/07/2011 - 1:04am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE 2011.6 post installation tips. Texstar 28/06/2011 - 5:57am
Blog entry Welcome to the Jungle srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:24pm
Blog entry Truths srlinuxx 23/06/2011 - 6:30pm
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am
Blog entry BIOS Flash update under linux. gfranken 02/06/2011 - 7:55pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 2011 - Preview Graphics Texstar 9 03/06/2011 - 2:13am

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Who Are the Leaders in Open Source Software for IoT Application Development?

    Which vendors lead in open source IoT development tools? Our RTInsights survey looks at the intersection of IoT, dev tools, and open source software.

    The role of open source software (OSS) in IoT application development is unmistakable. But who are the vendors that enterprises look to for open source IoT development tools? We decided to find out with a survey that looked at the intersection of IoT, developer tools, and open source software (see “Research Objectives and Methodology,” below, for details on the 2017 Worldwide IoT Innovation Survey, conducted by RTInsights).

  • Google Releases Open Source Tool That Checks Postgres Backup Integrity

    Google has released a new open-source tool for verifying PostgreSQL (Postgres) database backups. 

    Enterprises using the PostgresSQL can use the tool to verify if any data corruption or data loss has occurred when backing up their database.  Google is already using the tool for customers of Google Cloud SQL for Postgres. Starting this week, it is now also available as open source code. 

    Brett Hesterberg, product manager at Google's cloud unit and Alexis Guajardo, a senior software engineer at the company described the new feature as a command line tool that administrators can execute against a Postgres database.

  • OpenBSD gains Wi-Fi "auto-join"

    In a change which is bound to be welcomed widely, -current has gained "auto-join" for Wi-Fi networks. Peter Hessler (phessler@) has been working on this for quite some time and he wrote about it in his p2k18 hackathon report.

  • OpenBSD Finally Has The Ability To Auto-Join WiFi Networks

    Granted OpenBSD isn't the most desktop focused BSD out there and that WiFi isn't therefore the highest priority for this security-focused operating system, but with the latest code it can now finally auto-join WiFi networks.

  • Best Practices for Open Source Governance [Ed: WhiteSource neglects to say that: 1) proprietary software is the problem here (make it FOSS and problem gone); 2) proprietary software poses greater compliance threats]

Security: Updates, DOD and Red Hat on "Security Hardening Rules"

Filed under
Red Hat
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Year-old router bug exploited to steal sensitive DOD drone, tank documents

     

    In May, a hacker perusing vulnerable systems with the Shodan search engine found a Netgear router with a known vulnerability—and came away with the contents of a US Air Force captain's computer. The purloined files from the captain—the officer in charge (OIC) of the 432d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron's MQ-9 Reaper Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMU)at Creech Air Force Base, Nevada—included export-controlled information regarding Reaper drone maintenance.

  • Security Hardening Rules

    Many users of Red Hat Insights are familiar with the security rules we create to alert them about security vulnerabilities on their system, especially concerning high-profile issues such as Spectre/Meltdown or Heartbleed. In this post, I'd like to talk about the other category of security related rules, those related to security hardening.

    In all of the products we ship, we make a concerted effort to ship thoughtful, secure default settings to minimize the amount of configuration needed to do the work you want to do. With complex packages such as Apache httpd, however, every installation will require some degree of customization before it's ready for deployment to production, and with more complex configurations, there's a chance that a setting or the interaction between several settings can have security implications which aren't immediately evident. Additionally, sometimes systems are configured in a manner that aids rapid development, but those configurations aren't suitable for production environments.

    With our hardening rules, we detect some of the most common security-related configuration issues and provide context to help you understand the represented risks, as well as recommendations on how to remediate the issues.

The NVIDIA/AMD Linux GPU Gaming Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Dollar For July 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

In part with GPU demand by crypto-currency miners waning a bit, NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics card availability at retailers has been improving in recent weeks as well as seeing less inflated prices than just recently had been the case. Given the better availability and stabilizing prices, here is a fresh look of the current line-up of GeForce and Radeon graphics cards under Ubuntu Linux using the newest AMD/NVIDIA drivers and also providing performance-per-dollar metrics given current retail prices.

Read more

Ubuntu: Demystifying Snap Confinement, 'Minimal', “Ubuntu Is Everywhere”, and Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Demystifying Snap Confinement

    Snaps introduce some new concepts to the Linux ecosystem which developers can take advantage of, and snap users need to appreciate. When installing a snap, it’s important to understand what parts of the system the application wants access to. It’s up to the user to decide to install (or not) a snap, and the confinement model empowers the user in the decision making process.

  • Canonical releases Minimal Ubuntu for servers, containers and the cloud

    There's a new version of Ubuntu on the block -- Ubuntu Minimal. It's been stripped right back to the bone to leave a tiny footprint, and these back Linux distros should boot 40 percent faster than a standard Ubuntu server image. Despite the reduced footprint size, Ubuntu Minimal retains all of Ubuntu's standard tools (such as ssh, apt and snapd) and maintain full compatibility.

    Designed for cloud developers and ops, Canonical says that the release is intended for completely automated operations, and as such much of the user-friendliness has been stripped out, but it's still ideal for used in KVM, Google Computer Engine and AWS.

  • This Infographic From Canonical Shows “Ubuntu Is Everywhere”

    Microsoft Windows owns the lion’s share in the operating system market, but at the same time, we cannot deny the presence of Linux. The fact that Linux Ubuntu powers Netflix, Snapchat, Dropbox, Uber, Tesla, and International Space Station is enough to prove the might of the opensource kernel.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E18 – Eighteen Summers - Ubuntu Podcast

GNOME: GTK+ 4.0, GUADEC, Fedora Atomic Workstation, and Pitivi @ GSoC

Filed under
GNOME
  • GTK+ 4.0 Likely Being Released In Spring Of 2019

    While the GTK+ 4.0 tool-kit was previously talked about for release by the end of 2018, that's now looking more like spring of 2019 when this next major version will be released.

    Happening the past week was the GUADEC 2018 GNOME developer conference and now the GTK+ team has put out their notes from the planning and discussions that happened pertaining to the next major version of the tool-kit.

    In case you missed the recent GTK news, a GTK+ 3.24 minor feature update release is being planned for this fall alongside GNOME 3.30. GTK+ 3.24 will serve as an interim release until GTK+ 4.0 is available and adopted.

  • A report from the Guadec GTK+ BoF

    The GTK+ team had a full day planning session during the BoF days at Guadec, and we had a full room, including representatives from several downstreams, not just GNOME.

  • Writing docs in a container

    In February, Matthias Clasen started a series of blog posts about Fedora Atomic Workstation (now Team Silverblue) and Flatpak. I gave it a try to see how the container would work with the documentation tools.

    The screenshot below shows the setup I used to submit this merge request. The buildah container is in the shell window on the right where git and Emacs operate in the /srv directory. At the same time on the Silverblue desktop, gitg and Yelp see the same files in the /var/srv directory.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 3

    In my last post (link), I talked about Pitivi finally getting a Welcome window. In this window, the layout of the recent projects list was pretty basic – we were only showing the name of the projects.

Linux Kernel: VKMS, CAKE, Xen and AMDVLK

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Virtual Kernel Mode-Setting Driver Being Added To Linux 4.19

    Linux 4.19 is shaping up to be a pretty exciting kernel release for what is expected to be the last version before Linux 5.0.

    Adding to the list of Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) improvements in Linux 4.19, VKMS has been added to Linux 4.19. The VKMS driver is the virtual kernel mode-setting effort, most recently worked on as part of this year's Google Summer of Code.

    The virtual KMS driver is a basic KMS driver exposing a CRTC/encoder/connector/plane that can be used for headless machines to run an X.Org Server or even Wayland and serves for virtual display purposes without necessa

  • Networking CAKE Is Ready For Tasting With Linux 4.19

    For those maintaining their own home-built Linux router, Linux 4.19 is going to be pretty exciting: CAKE Qdisc has been merged into net-next, making it a feature for this next kernel cycle.

  • Latest Xen Hypervisor Arrives Late, but Greatly Improved
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Now Supports Direct Display Mode For VR HMDs

    The AMDVLK open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver has seen its latest weekly code drop that brings with it some of the extensions needed for supporting the Steam VR experience.

    The AMDVLK driver now supports VK_EXT_direct_mode_display and VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extensions. These extensions are needed so a Vulkan application/compositor can take exclusive control of display(s), such as the use-case for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs) with being controlled by the SteamVR compositor. The VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extension is needed for acquiring control of a display that is associated with an X11 screen from the X.Org Server.

Teleconsole – Share Your Linux Terminal with Your Friends

Filed under
Software

Teleconsole is a free open source and powerful command line tool for sharing your Linux terminal session with people you trust. Your friends or team members can connect to your Linux terminal session via a command-line over SSH or via a browser over HTTPS protocol.

Read more

MellowPlayer Integrates Music Streaming Services With Your Desktop (Cross-Platform)

Filed under
Software

The application was updated to version 3.4.0 a few days ago, receiving some important enhancements, like support for Yandex Music, and a settings page for each plugin. Only the YouTube plugin currently has its own service-dependent settings right now, which allow you to set the app to automatically mute and skip ads.

Google Play Music was also enhanced with favorites and seeking support, and the Spotify integration was fixed.

Read more

Games: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • The new Counter-Strike: Global Offensive Panorama UI is now available on Linux

    After waiting for a bit of extra time, Linux gamers can now enjoy the brand new Panorama UI update in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive.

    To activate it, you need to add "-panorama" as a launch option on Steam. Simply right right on the game in your Steam library, hit properties and then hit the set launch options button and paste it in there.

  • Action racing game 'Road Redemption' updated with improved physics

    Annoyingly, they messed up the executable naming for the Linux & Mac versions. You can launch it directly from the installed folder, but not from Steam directly until they fix this. Sadly, that means the Steam Controller doesn't work as a gamepad, even when using SC Controller the buttons were all messed up so it's keyboard only until they fix it up.

  • Fallout inspired ATOM RPG has another sizeable update

    ATOM RPG, the rough but very promising Fallout inspired game has another sizeable update that's live on Steam.

  • Kalypso Media buy the rights to the Commandos IP, a new game is coming plus updates to older titles

    Kalypso Media now officially own the rights to the Commandos IP which could mean good things for Linux gamers.

    Kalypso Media have been pretty good to Linux gamers in recent years, with them publishing Linux titles like Sudden Strike 4, Railway Empire, Dungeons 3, Tropico 6 (coming soon) and plenty more.

  • Valve have revamped the Upcoming Releases section on Steam

    Valve are continuing their Steam store updated, with the latest section to get a makeover being the Upcoming games section.

    Originally, it was a very basic list of all games to be released on Steam for whatever platform you had selected to view. Instead, it's now a "Popular Upcoming" list that takes into account pre-release interest in a game using wishlists and other data.

  • Twin-stick shooter 'NeuroVoider' is now on GOG

    Flying Oak Games first title NeuroVoider is an action packed twin-stick shooter RPG and it's now available DRM free on GOG.

Debian Joins KDE's Advisory Board

Filed under
KDE
Debian

Since the KDE Advisory Board was created in 2016, we have been encouraging more and more organizations to join it, either as patrons or as non-profit partner organizations. With Ubuntu (via Canonical) and openSUSE (via SUSE) we already had two popular Linux distributions represented in the Advisory board. They are now joined by one of the biggest and oldest purely community-driven distributions: Debian.

KDE has a long-standing and friendly relationship with Debian, and we are happy to formalize it now. Having Debian on our Advisory Board will allow us to learn from them, share our experience with them, and deepen our collaboration even further.

Read more

Security: BGP Hijack Factory, IDN, Microsoft Windows Back Doors and Intel Defects

Filed under
Security
  • Shutting down the BGP Hijack Factory

    It started with a lengthy email to the NANOG mailing list on 25 June 2018: independent security researcher Ronald Guilmette detailed the suspicious routing activities of a company called Bitcanal, whom he referred to as a “Hijack Factory.” In his post, Ronald detailed some of the Portuguese company’s most recent BGP hijacks and asked the question: why Bitcanal’s transit providers continue to carry its BGP hijacked routes on to the global [I]nternet?

    This email kicked off a discussion that led to a concerted effort to kick this bad actor, who has hijacked with impunity for many years, off the [I]nternet.

  • Malformed Internationalized Domain Name (IDN) Leads to Discovery of Vulnerability in IDN Libraries

    The Punycode decoder is an implementation of the algorithm described in section 6.2 of RFC 3492. As it walks the input string, the Punycode decoder fills the output array with decoded code point values. The output array itself is typed to hold unsigned 32-bit integers while the Unicode code point space fits within 21 bits. This leaves a remainder of 11 unused bits that can result in the production of invalid Unicode code points if accidentally set. The vulnerability is enabled by the lack of a sanity check to ensure decoded code points are less than the Unicode code point maximum of 0x10FFFF. As such, for offending input, unchecked decoded values are copied directly to the output array and returned to the caller.

  • GandCrab ransomware adds NSA tools for faster spreading

    "It no longer needs a C2 server (it can operate in airgapped environments, for example) and it now spreads via an SMB exploit -- including on XP and Windows Server 2003 (along with modern operating systems)," Beaumont wrote in a blog post. "As far as I'm aware, this is the first ransomware true worm which spreads to XP and 2003 -- you may remember much press coverage and speculation about WannaCry and XP, but the reality was the NSA SMB exploit (EternalBlue.exe) never worked against XP targets out of the box."

  • Intel Discloses New Spectre Flaws, Pays Researchers $100K

    Intel disclosed a series of vulnerabilities on July 10, including new variants of the Spectre vulnerability the company has been dealing with since January.

    Two new Spectre variants were discovered by security researchers Vladimir Kiriansky and Carl Waldspurger, who detailed their findings in a publicly released research paper tilted, "Speculative Buffer Overflows: Attacks and Defenses."

    "We introduce Spectre1.1, a new Spectre-v1 variant that leverages speculative stores to create speculative buffer over-flows," the researchers wrote. "We also present Spectre 1.2 on CPUs that do not enforce read/write protections, speculative stores can overwrite read-only data and code pointers to breach sandboxes."

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Top Indian carriers taking "open telco" approach to build future networks for new services: Red Hat

    Top Indian telecom service providers are taking “Open Telco” approach in building next-generation networks using networks functions virtualisation technology to bring flexibility to offer new services, and to prepare for 5G in coming years, according to the US-based open source solutions provider, Red Hat.

    Ben Panic, Director of Sales, Asia Pacific Region (Telecommunications) at Red Hat told ET that Indian telcos have already deployed open source technology-based solutions in the core functions of their mobile networks. “The target goal of NFV is to open, be multi-vendor, be flexible and agile,” he said.

  • Celebrating Red Hat’s 25th anniversary: How partners play an important role [Ed: reposted from Red Hat's site]

    As Red Hat celebrates 25 years, I would be remiss not to mention the role Red Hat partners have played in our company’s story. Partners have been an important multiplier for Red Hat and building our customer success. They are important to our future.

    Early endeavours in the channel

    In 2006, I joined Red Hat to expand the partner ecosystem. I’d been working in the channel since Moses was around, or at least since 1981. Although we were mainly selling direct, there was growing confidence that we could make the transformation to support a robust partner ecosystem.

  • Analysts Set Red Hat Inc (RHT) Target Price at $157.79
  • Buy Red Hat, An Attractive Cloud Computing Play

How developers can get involved with open source networking

Filed under
OSS

There have always been integration challenges with open source software, whether in pulling together Linux distributions or in mating program subsystems developed by geographically distributed communities. However, today we're seeing those challenges writ large with the rise of large ecosystems of projects in areas such as networking and cloud-native computing.

Integration was one topic of my conversation with Heather Kirksey, the VP of Community and Ecosystem Development at the Linux Foundation, recorded for the Cloudy Chat podcast. We also talked about modularity and how developers can get involved with open source networking. For the past three years, Kirksey has directed the Linux Foundation's Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV), which is now part of the LF Networking Fund that's working to improve collaboration and efficiency across open source networking projects.

Read more

Top 5 MMORPGs for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

If you think Linux is only for servers and people who don't like watching YouTube videos or playing games, you're wrong! Linux is one of the most versatile operating systems in the world and is quickly developing into a beautiful environment where cool games can run natively.

For instance, Steam is now native to Linux! Not to mention, there are plenty of Linux-compatible games to try and most of them feature commercial quality. Sadly, MMORPGs are still a bit behind when it comes to Linux, but not for long! Still, there is a way around this as there are several cool games to try even when all you have is the dear old Linux. Below we'll list five of the most fun and entertaining MMORPGs that run natively on Linux.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Top 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Failed

    1) Linux isn't pre-installed - No matter how much we may debate it, having Windows pre-installed on PCs means that's what people are likely to end up using. In order for someone to move over to Linux on the desktop, there must be a clear reason to do so. There is the problem. The only time I've personally seen users make the switch over to Linux from Windows comes down to frustration with Windows or a desire to advance their skills into an IT field.

    My own Linux story, for example, was a mixture of the two examples above. First off, I was just done with Windows. I had already been dabbling with Linux at the time I completely switched, but I become disenfranchised with the Microsoft way of doing things. So for me, the switch to Linux was based out of frustration.

    Had I not experienced any frustrations with Windows, I might not have ever thought to jump ship over to an alternative. Even when I built my own PCs myself, the OS offered at computer stores was Windows only. This is a huge hurdle for Linux adoption on the desktop.

    2) Linux freedom vs convenience - It's been my experience that people expect a user experience that's consistent and convenience. How one defines this depends on the individual user. For some, it's a matter of familiarity or perceived dependability. For more advanced PC users, a consistent convenience may mean a preferred workflow or specific applications.

    The greater takeaway is that when people are aware of other operating systems, they will usually stick with that they've used the longest. This presents a problem when getting people to try Linux. When using a desktop platform for a long time, you develop habits and expectations that don't lend themselves well to change.

  • How to be efficient and cost effective (or not)

    It's the mid-1990s, and this big corporation is working on a major development project to replace most of its critical systems, says a Unix admin pilot fish working there.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #41 – Dissecting Kubernetes Surveys

    In a world of open source projects, privately funded companies, one-off cloud services and a mix of public companies, it can often be difficult to determine hype from trends from real usage.

  • PodCTL Podcast #38 – A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes
  • Optimizing a Python application with C++ code

    I’ve been working lately in a command line application called Bard which is a music manager for your local music collection. Bard does an acoustic fingerprinting of your songs (using acoustid) and stores all song metadata in a sqlite database. With this, you can do queries and find song duplicates easily even if the songs are not correctly tagged. I’ll talk in another post more about Bard and its features, but here I wanted to talk about the algorithm to find song duplicates and how I optimized it to run around 8000 times faster.

    [...]

    An obvious improvement I didn’t do yet was replacing the map with a vector so I don’t have to convert it before each for_each call. Also, vectors allow to reserve space in advance, and since I know the final size the vector will have at the end of the whole algorithm, I changed to code to use reserve wisely.

    This commit gave the last increase of speed, to 7998x, 36680 songs/second and would fully process a music collection of 1000 songs in just 13 seconds..

  • How A KDE Developer Used C++17 & Boost.Python For About A 8,000x Speed-Up

    Open-source developer Antonio Larrosa who contributes to KDE and openSUSE has been developing a command-line music manager called Bard. He's written an interesting post about how he sped up some of his operations by around eight-thousand times faster.

    In particular, Antonio was focused on speeding up the process of finding song/music duplicates in the user's local music collection. What started out as Python code was morphed into optimized C++ code. Little surprise, the C++ code once tuned was immensely faster than Python -- but the blog post is interesting for those curious about the impact of the various steps he took for tuning this implementation.

  • GLib 2.58 Is Looking Good With Portability Improvements, Efficient Process Launching

    The GLib low-level GNOME library while being quite mature is seeing a significant update with its version 2.58 release due out this September for GNOME 3.30.

    Two of the biggest GLib 2.58 changes we have covered up to now on Phoronix has been the new generic reference counting API and more efficient app launching. The reference counting API has been in the works for 6+ years to help GLib's bindings/integration with languages utilizing automatic memory management / garbage collection. The more efficient process launching via the use of posix_nspawn() is also exciting for better performance, particularly on systems suffering from memory pressure.

  • Taiwan Travel Blog - Day 2 & 3

    My Taiwan Travel blog continues! I was expecting the weather to go bad on July 10th, but the typhoon arrived late and the rain only started around 20:00. I'm pretty happy because that means I got to enjoy another beautiful day of hiking in Taroko National Park.

    I couldn't find time on the 10th to sit down and blog about my trip, so this blog will also include what I did on the 11th.

  • Canonical Releases Minimal Ubuntu, Optimised for Multicloud

    Canonical, the company behind popular Linux system Ubuntu, has released Minimal Ubuntu, a pared-back, significantly faster iteration of its server operating system (OS).

  • Nokia signs billion-euro network tech deal with China Mobile

     

    Nokia said over the one-year framework agreement it will deliver mobile radio access, fixed access, IP routing and optical transport systems as well as other services to the Chinese mobile operator.  

  •  

Software and Games: Wego, Cockpit, Samba, Podman, Humble Store's Square Enix Publisher Week and GOG

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • wego – ASCII weather app for the terminal

    I spend an inordinate amount of time at the command line. I almost live on the command line because of its convenience. It’s probably because I love terminal apps.

    wego is another gem of a terminal application. It’s open source weather software written in the Go programming language and designed for the terminal. It displays the weather in a variety of visually attractive ways. It’s a lightweight way to keep an eye on the weather without requiring a web browser. The information is SSL-encrypted for transmission to the local computer.

    You may have been using the software without knowing it. wttr.in is a web frontend for wego that you can access using curl to provide weather information from a terminal. If you’ve already got curl on your system, there’s nothing to install. It’s got lots of options; you can find out about them from curl wttr.in/:help

  • Cockpit 172

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 172.

  • Samba 4.9 Is Working On Many Improvements, New Features

    Developers behind Samba, the open-source SMB/CIFS implementation for providing integration with the Windows Server Domain and Windows clients, is preparing for their next 4.9 release.

    In stepping towards their first preview release of Samba 4.9, their news file has been getting filled in over the past couple days to reflect all of the changes that have been staged in Samba Git since the Samba 4.9 branching at the beginning of the year.

  • Using podman for containers

    Podman is one of the newer tool in the container world, it can help you to run OCI containers in pods. It uses Buildah to build containers, and runc or any other OCI compliant runtime. Podman is being actively developed.

    I have moved the two major bots we use for dgplug summer training (named batul and tenida) under podman and they are running well for the last few days.

  • The Humble Store 'Square Enix Publisher Week' has some great Linux games on offer

    For those after some of the bigger Linux games, you should take a look at Humble Store's Square Enix Publisher Week.

  • The updated release of 'Desperados: Wanted Dead or Alive' that has Linux support is now on GOG

    As a reminder, the updated release from THQ Nordic doesn't just add Linux support. It also adds language support for French, German, Spanish, Italian, Russian and English to the main game. It also adds in the lost demo level, with more limited language support.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes. openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.