Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 10 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 8:32am
Story New Czech law makes ICT neutrality a right Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:57am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 3 09/12/2018 - 7:54am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:50am
Story OSS: Mozilla, WordPress, FreeBSD, Unifont, CZI Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:44am
Story How Fedora’s Wallpaper Are Made Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:19am
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:17am
Story High Resolution Scroll-Wheel Support Re-Added Ahead Of Linux 4.21 Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:15am
Story PhysX Liberated Roy Schestowitz 5 09/12/2018 - 7:01am
Story Games: Inside, Dirt 4, Sundered: Eldritch Edition Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 6:13am

Linaro partners with IIC on upcoming 96Boards Industrial Edition spec

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linaro and the Industrial Internet Consortium announced a partnership to collaborate on open source Arm standards for industrial IoT involving OTA, TSN, and security, as well as develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec.

In September Arm-backed Linaro, which creates open source Linux and Android code for Arm devices and oversees the 96Boards open hardware standard, joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC). This week the IIC and Linaro announced a partnership to work on Arm industrial IoT (IIoT) standards.

Of particular interest is a plan to develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec. Other projects will include standardization around Over-The-Air (OTA) updates, Time Sensitive Networking (TSN), and trustworthiness (i.e. digital trust security systems).

Read more

AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With the very newest AMDGPU Linux kernel patches, the Radeon RX 590 is now working correctly on Linux. Here's a look at how this latest Polaris graphics card is performing for Linux games against seventeen other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards in a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan benchmarks.

AMD launched the Radeon RX 590 in mid-November as a Polaris shrink down to 12nm and featuring 36 compute units, a base frequency up to 1469MHz and boost up to 1545MHz, 2304 Stream processors, 8GB of GDDR5 video memory, and is rated for up to 7.1 TFLOPs of performance potential.

Read more

5 Screen Recorders for the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

There are so many reasons why you might need to record your Linux desktop. The two most important are for training and for support. If you are training users, a video recording of the desktop can go a long way to help them understand what you are trying to impart. Conversely, if you’re having trouble with one aspect of your Linux desktop, recording a video of the shenanigans could mean the difference between solving the problem and not. But what tools are available for the task? Fortunately, for every Linux user (regardless of desktop), there are options available. I want to highlight five of my favorite screen recorders for the Linux desktop. Among these five, you are certain to find one that perfectly meets your needs. I will only be focusing on those screen recorders that save as video. What video format you prefer may or may not dictate which tool you select.

Read more

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Now Rolling Out to Ubuntu Phone Users, Here's What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 is now rolling out to Fairphone 2, Nexus 5, OnePlus One, BQ Aquaris M10 FHD, Nexus 4, Meizu PRO 5, Meizu MX 4, BQ Aquaris E4.5, and BQ Aquaris E5 HD devices as an incremental update to the OTA-5 version released two months ago, which rebased Ubuntu Touch on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series.

"Ubuntu Touch is the privacy and freedom respecting mobile operating system by UBports. Our newest update, OTA-6, is rolling out over the next five days (completing on Wednesday, December 12). You can skip to "How to get OTA-6" to get it now if you're impatient, or read on to learn more about this release," said UBports in today's announcement.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Officially Released

Oneplus One improvements

The December 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2018 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Mesa 18.3.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.3.0

    Mesa 18.3.0 is now available.

    This release consists of approximately 1700 commits from 120 developers.

    Huge thanks to all the developers, testers and users for their ongoing work and support shaping up the 18.3.0 release.

  • Mesa 18.3 Released With Intel & Radeon Vulkan Driver Improvements, New GPU Support

    Mesa 18.3 is now available as the latest quarterly feature update to these open-source OpenGL and Vulkan graphics drivers for Linux.

    The Mesa 18.3 features are aplenty and on the AMD side range from Raven 2, Picasso, and Vega 20 support through RADV Vulkan transform feedback, faster RadeonSI fast color clears, OpenGL 4.5 compatibility profile support, and many RADV Vulkan additions. The Intel stack meanwhile picked up new PCI IDs, various Vulkan driver extensions, and more.

  • Mesa 18.3.0 for those of you using the open source drivers

    For those of you using Intel and AMD (and some older NVIDIA cards) Mesa 18.3.0 was officially released today.

    It has been three months since the last major release, so as expected this new and improved version comes with all the latest bells and whistles.

Linux Networking Performance To Improve Thanks To Retpoline Overhead Reduction

Filed under
Linux

One of the areas where Linux performance has been lower this year since Spectre came to light has been for networking performance, but with the upcoming Linux 4.21 cycle that will be partially addressed.

Linux networking performance took a hit from the introduction of Retpolines "Return Trampolines" at the start of the year for addressing Spectre Variant Two.

Read more

Mageia 7 Beta Finally Rolls Along For Testing

Filed under
MDV

It's been a year and a half since the release of Mageia 6 while finally the Mageia 7 beta images have surfaced.

The Mageia 7 Beta is shipping with the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, is running on the fresh Linux 4.19 kernel, provides the Mesa 18.3 3D drivers, and has a wealth of package updates compared to the state shipped by Mageia 6. Mageia 7 also offers reworked ARM support (including initial AArch64 enablement), DNF as an alternative to URPMI, and a variety of other updates. The in-progress release notes cover some of the other Mageia 7 changes.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Avouch Linux 0.1.0 Beta 1 Gnome Run Through
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • How to harness big data for maximum business value

    Despite most businesses understanding the power and competitive advantage they could gain from harnessing their big data more effectively and leveraging it more efficiently, it’s not an easy goal to achieve.

    That’s why we’ve partnered with Spicule to co-present, ‘How to harness big data for maximum business value’, a webinar dealing with the challenges of gathering and processing data.

  • The Intel Linux Discrete GPU Driver Updated -- For Their Two Decade Old i740

    While we are all super anxious to learn more about the Intel discrete graphics card offerings planned for their initial debut in 2020, in representing the beauty of open-source, there was an open-source Linux display driver update on Thursday for their "original" discrete card: the Intel740.

    Yesterday marked the xf86-video-i740 1.4.0 driver release, the open-source X.Org driver that supports the original Intel 740 display hardware as Intel's only released discrete graphics chip up to this point. That was two decades ago, but in showing the possibilities by open-source software, there's this new display driver release.

  • 3.5-inch SBC features Intel Coffee Lake chips

    Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37L” SBC showcases Intel’s 8th Gen Core CPUs with triple displays, up to 16GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 2x SATA, 4x USB 3.1, 6x serial, and a mini-PCIe slot.

    In August, Commell launched the LV-67X, one of the first industrial Mini-ITX boards with Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs. Now, it has followed up with a Coffee Lake based 3.5-inch LS-37L board. The SBC has the same FCLGA1151 socket, supporting up to 6-core, 65W TDP Coffee Lake S-series processors such as the 3.1GHz/4.3GHz Core i5-8600.

Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Play with NFC HAT I

    The other day I got an NFC HAT for SBC to play with. And I started to play with it on my Raspberry Pi last week.

    Things did not go smoothly, which is expected. But some part of it still goes beyond my expection.

    So what’s it? It’s a NFC development board based on NXP PN7150. You can buy it from taobao. It’s header is compatible with Raspberry Pi, and minimal modification to use with Salted Fish Pi. As I already have Raspberry Pi 1/2/3, I simply plug it onto Raspberry Pi 2 running with Fedora.

  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2018/10
  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2018/09
  • Fedora 29 : Shotcut video editor.

Software and Howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Wipro expands global partnership with open source software provider Alfresco
  • Crypto Giant Bitmain Open Sources KYC Software Tool ‘Coconut’
  • Crypto Giant Bitmain Open Sources KYC Software Tool ‘Coconut’
  • Comcast Leads Trellis, an Open Source Data Center Switching Fabric

    At the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Connect event this week, Ron Howald, VP of network architecture at Comcast, copped to the fact that Google forced service providers such as Comcast to find ways to deliver faster internet speeds. “Google had quite a bit to do with setting the bar when they started with Google Fiber,” said Howald.

  • Open source: a slow rise to the top

    Is the debate over? Are we no longer fighting over open source versus propriety software?

    Thomas Lee, CEO, Wingu: If we look inside our customer base, we are seeing widespread adoption of open source technology. But I think it's also clear that propriety is not going away. I've seen a company recently take out all its open source software in favour of propriety. Clearly, the debate isn't going away.

    Wilhelm Strydom, relationship manager, Obsidian Systems: Is there room for proprietary stuff? Clearly there is if you look at the success of the most propriety vendors out there, in terms of not only software, but hardware as well.

    But if you talk back-end, what happens behind that interface, I don't think there's much of a battle going on. The battle has mostly been won by open source. This can be seen in some of the propriety guys adopting open source principals. In this respect, open source has clearly been the winner.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces release FIVE, 5G ready

    ETSI is excited to announce the availability of OSM Release FIVE. This new Release is a huge step towards 5G network deployments and their end-to-end orchestration by telecom operators. In Release FIVE, OSM extends its orchestration capabilities beyond virtual domains, expanding them across transport networks; as well as physical and hybrid network elements.

    [...]

    Thus, among a large number of new features, the OSM Release FIVE stands out by bringing complete support of 5G Network Slices; dynamic creation of inter-datacentre connections across heterogeneous Wide Area Networks (WAN), extended support of Service Function Chaining (SFC); policy-based closed loop control, extended monitoring capabilities, including VNF metrics collection; and support of physical and hybrid network functions, (PNFs and HNFs respectively).

    In addition, Release FIVE includes significant enhancements in terms of user experience, such as a brand new GUI-based Composer for network functions and services, an improved dashboard for logs, metrics and alarms, and much faster start-up and responsiveness.

  • FOSSID Establishes First Independent Mirror of World's Largest Source Code Archive

    FOSSID and Software Heritage today announced that they have signed an agreement to establish the first independent mirror of the largest source code archive in the world.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Preview – Your Personal Prelude to Kubecon/Seattle

    Over 100+ companies will be in attending next week’s OpenShift Commons Gathering which is co-located with KubeCon and CloudNativeCon in Seattle at the Washington State Convention Center. The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss real implementations of container technologies, best practices for cloud native infrastructure and the upstream projects that make up the OpenShift ecosystem.

  • Multi-model databases are more juicy

    It sounds like a brand of orange juice… and its community edition is written in C++, but actually ArangoDB is a native multi-model database.

    ArangoDB Community Edition is available under open-source license… but news this week focuses on the release of core version 3.4 as a transactional database for developers.

  • Open-source discovery of chemical leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarials
  • CZI announces support for open-source software efforts to improve biomedical imaging

    Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced funding for open-source software efforts to improve image analysis and visualization in biomedicine. Microscopy -- critical to modern cell biology -- generates large volumes of complex data that pose significant challenges for analysis and visualization. The funding will support developers ("Imaging Software Fellows") from three projects to develop and maintain software tools, and begin collaborating to help create a cohesive, shared ecosystem of resources that can accelerate basic research and benefit the entire field.

  • A Closer Look at Tesla’s Open-Source Patent Pledge
  • Ground Breaking Decision In Open Source Software: The Versata Software Case

    An Open Source Software is a type of software with a source code which can be modified, enhanced and inspected by ANYONE. Source code is that part of a particular software program which empowers a person to alter how the software works or improve it by adding features or fixing parts that do not work properly. Differing from closed software, whereby only the person/organization that created the software has the capacity to alter it, OSS is preferred more and is a better option for the users than the former, granting them more freedom in relation to the software. Some prime examples of OSS are the Apache HTTP Server, the e-commerce platform osCommerce, internet browsers Mozilla Firefox and Chromium. Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn all release OSS so developers can share knowledge, create solutions, and contribute to stable and functional products. There are certain landmark cases in the field of open source software that hold paramount importance in deciding the future of the same as well as opening legal floodgates in its respect, one of which has been discussed at length below.

    [...]

    The decisions arrived at these cases are important in a number of ways, primarily because it confirmed the working of the GPLv2 structure. Mark Radcliffe, a licensing expert and partner at law firm DLA Piper has rightly exclaimed that "The days of open source software free lunches are rapidly coming to an end, and that means enterprises that fail to stick to the terms of open source licenses can expect to be sued."

  • Intake for Cataloging Spark
  • 6 Lessons from Learning to Code
  • Auto incrementing IDs for MongoDB
  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Firefox Coming to the Windows 10 on Qualcomm Snapdragon Devices Ecosystem

    At Mozilla, we’ve been building browsers for 20 years and we’ve learned a thing or two over those decades. One of the most important lessons is putting people at the center of the web experience. We pioneered user-centric features like tabbed browsing, automatic pop-up blocking, integrated web search, and browser extensions for the ultimate in personalization. All of these innovations support real users’ needs first, putting business demands in the back seat.

    Mozilla is uniquely positioned to build browsers that act as the user’s agent on the web and not simply as the top of an advertising funnel. Our mission not only allows us to put privacy and security at the forefront of our product strategy, it demands that we do so. You can see examples of this with Firefox’s Facebook Container extension, Firefox Monitor, and its private by design browser data syncing features. This will become even more apparent in upcoming releases of Firefox that will block certain cross-site and third-party tracking by default while delivering a fast, personal, and highly mobile experience.

Security: Site Security and New FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Why do small sites get hacked?

    High traffic volume helps boost earnings on partner programs by redirecting visitors to other sites, gets more views of unauthorized advertisements and attracts more clicks on rogue links. But that is not the only way hackers make money.

    Unprotected sites with low traffic volume are equally attractive to hackers. It is the way they are used that differs from how hackers monetize more popular websites. Any normal site, with an audience of as little as 30 visitors a day, can still be threatened by hacking and infection. 

  • (Website) size is not important

    A common fallacy says that big, popular web sites are more likely to be the targets of hacking. After all, they have the biggest customer databases and the most amount of traffic. To a hacker, more traffic means more money. Right? 

    Not quite. In Greg Zemskov’s latest blog post, he explains why small sites are just as attractive to hackers as big ones, what the hackers do with such sites, and what small site owners and administrators can do to avoid becoming victims.

  • ESET discovers 21 new Linux malware families [Ed:  Catalin Cimpanu misrepresents what ESET actually wrote. Go to the source, not those flame-baiters of CBS.]
  • Top 5 New Open Source Vulnerabilities in November 2018 [Ed: Microsoft friends are so eager to make FOSS look dangerous, like quite major a risk]

Plan your own holiday calendar at the Linux command line

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

Read more

Is open source wealth distribution fair?

Filed under
OSS

If wealth is the abundance of valuable possessions, open source has a wealth of software. While no one “owns” open source, some are better than others at converting this communal wealth to personal wealth.

Many open source project maintainers who produce free open source software do not have a model for deriving income from the assets they have created. However, companies that use open source software to enhance their products and services convert this valuable asset into income.

Read more

Linux Foundation: Training, Cloud Foundry's Kearns, and Ibrahim Haddad

Filed under
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation and Coursera Launch New Specialization for Open Source, Linux and Git

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced today that enrollment for a new 4-course specialization, Open Source Software Development, Linux and Git is now open. Offered through the world’s largest online platform for higher education, Coursera, students will attain the skills and knowledge needed to work comfortably and productively in open source development communities; have a good understanding of the Linux environment, as well as methods and tools required to successfully use it; and know how to use Git, the distributed version control system. This is the first time The Linux Foundation and Coursera have partnered to provide training opportunities.

    Developed by the Linux Foundation’s Director of Training, Jerry Cooperstein, The Open Source Software Development, Linux and Git specialization is a remote learning program designed to give students a strong foundation of skills for working in open source development communities. It is designed for experienced computer users and developers who are looking to enter the world of open source development.

  • Cloud Foundry, Cloud Native, and Entering a Multi-Platform World with Abby Kearns

    When asked what she meant by multi-platform in the context of cloud, Kearns explained, “Multi-platform means that enterprises would want a variety of platforms for a variety of application workloads. There’s never going to be one technology that solves everything. It’s not going to be Cloud Foundry or Kubernetes; it’s going to be a mix. At the end of the day, enterprises are broad and complex. They have evolving needs. They want a mix of technologies that complement each other.”

    However, multi-platform brings its own set of challenges. “Technology is the easy part, my big worry is people getting caught up in the hype of something new and then they want to have it. Then they want to have the next shiny thing,” she said.

    When you get caught up in that hype cycle, you lose focus on what you need to do. Enterprises need to be aware of this and must ask themselves what do their business need to do? What are the outcomes they expect? How do they leverage technology to achieve that?

    “I think taking a step back and asking ourselves what are we really trying to solve,” she said. “I think just for me, sometimes it is — take a breath, pause and think, okay, where, where are we going and why?”

  • 2019 Predictions About Artificial Intelligence That Will Make Your Head Spin

    First, Ibrahim Haddad, Director of Research at The Linux Foundation says that there are two key areas to watch.

    "2019 is going to be the year of open source AI," predicts Haddad. "We’re already seeing companies begin to open source their internal AI projects and stacks, and I expect to see this accelerate in the coming year." He says that the reason for such a move is that it increases innovation, enables faster time-to-market and lower costs. "The cost of building a platform is high, and organizations are realizing the real value is in the models, training data and applications. We’re going to see harmonization around a set of critical projects creating a comprehensive open source stack for AI, machine learning and deep learning."

The Radeon RX 590 Is Finally Running Strong On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

It took the better part of a month since the debut of the latest Polaris hardware refresh, but with the latest AMDGPU kernel driver patch posted today, the AMD Radeon RX 590 now appears to be in great shape with the open-source Radeon graphics driver stack for Linux.

A few days ago I wrote about a few kernel patches and new firmware binaries for getting the Radeon RX 590 working on Linux. That was the case only to find that under 3D load, there were GPU hangs. With a new patch posted today, those hangs under load are corrected.

Read more

Also: A Final Batch Of DRM-Misc-Next Updates Before Linux 4.21

Zafiro Icon – A New Set Of Flat Icon Theme Pack With Light Colors For Linux Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Zafiro icons is minimalist icons created with the flat-desing technique, utilizing washed out colors and always accompanied by white.

This icon set looks good and awesome.

It’s a new set of flat icon pack and it’s not based on any other product.

I felt it’s similar to Paper Icon and you can get that by navigation to the corresponding link.

Since it’s new set of icon and the developer is requesting us to report for any missing application related icons and not for other categories.

If any one fork this icon pack then the developer would feel that his work got recognized.

This icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Best VPNs for GNU/Linux, and Google+ Chaos Again

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Best VPNs for Linux
  • After a Second Data Leak, Google+ Will Shut Down in April Instead of August
    Back in October, a security hole in Google+’s APIs lead Google to announce it was shutting down the service. Now, a second data leak has surfaced, causing the company to move the shutdown up by four months. This new data leak is quite similar to the first one: profile information such as name, email address, age, and occupation was exposed to developers, even for private profiles. It’s estimated that upwards of 52 million users were affected by this leak. The good news is that while the first hole was open for three years, this one was only an issue for six days, from November 7th to the 13th, 2018.

Linux and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Initial i.MX8 SoC Support & Development Board Possibly Ready For Linux 4.21
    While the i.MX8 series was announced almost two years ago and the open-source developers working on the enablement for these new NXP SoCs hoped for initial support in Linux 4.17, the Linux 4.21 kernel that will be released in the early months of 2019 is slated to possibly have the first i.MX8 support in the form of the i.MX8MQ and also supporting its development/evaluation board.
  • AeonWave: An Open-Source Audio Engine Akin To Microsoft's XAudio2 / Apple CoreAudio
    An open-source audio initiative that's been in development for years but flying under our radar until its lead developer chimed in is AeonWave, which supports Windows and Linux systems while being inspired by Microsoft XAudio and Apple's CoreAudio.
  • Take Linux Foundation Certification Exams from Anywhere
    2018 has seen a new wave of popularity for the open source community and it has sparked more interest in potential engineers, system administrators, and Linux experts. 2019 is around the corner and now is a good time to look up Linux certification examinations that will enable you to progress in your career. The good news we have for you is that the Linux Foundation has made certification examinations available online so that IT enthusiasts can get certificates in a wide range of open source domains.

Games Leftovers

  • The Linux version of Civilization VI has been updated with cross-platform multiplayer support
    Just in time for the holidays, Linux gamers finally have version parity with other platforms. Expect to be able to spend just one more turn playing with friends on other operating systems.
  • John Romero has announced a free unofficial spiritual successor to The Ultimate DOOM's 4th episode
    John Romero, one of the co-founders of id Software has revealed he's been working on SIGIL, a free megawad for the original 1993 DOOM. [...] These boxes, will contain music from Buckethead, along with a custom song written expressly for SIGIL. A tempting purchase for any big DOOM fan, I especially love the sound of a 16GB 3-1/2-inch floppy disk-themed USB. You have until December 24, 2018 to order one and I imagine stock will go quite quickly.
  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Sees Its First Alpha Release In Nearly Three Years
    Unvanquished had been easily one of the most promising open-source games several years back with decent in-game visuals/art, a continually improving "Daemon" engine that was a distant mod of ioquake3 while leveraging ETXReaL components and more, and all-around a well-organized, advancing open-source game project. Their monthly alpha releases stopped almost three years ago while today that's changed just ahead of Christmas. The Unvanquished developers announced Unvanquished Alpha 51 today as their first release in two years and eight months after having made fifty monthly alpha releases. While this is the fifty-first alpha, the developers say they should soon be ready for the beta drop.
  • Unvanquished, the free and open source shooter has a huge new release now out
    After being quiet for some time, the Unvanquished team is back and they have quite a lot to show off in the new release of their free and open source shooter. This is their first new release since April 2016, so the amount that's changed is quite striking! Hopefully, this will be the start of regular release once again, since they used to do monthly releases a few years ago and it was fun to watch it grow.
  • Valve adds even more gamepad support to their latest client beta
    Valve are continuing to support as many devices as possible with a new Steam client beta now available. Since there's no gamepad to rule them all, it makes sense for Valve to support as many as they can. Even though I love the Steam Controller, I do understand that it's not going to be a good fit for everyone. Now, Steam will support the PowerA wired/wireless GameCube Style controllers, PowerA Enhanced Wireless Controller and the PDP Faceoff Wired Pro Controller to boost their already rather large list of supported devices.
  • The turn-based tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is coming along nicely
    After a few months in Early Access, the tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark has come along nicely and it's quite impressive. It became available on Steam back in August, this was with same-day Linux support as promised from developer 6 Eyes Studio after their successful Kickstarter.
  • Citra, the Nintendo 3DS emulator now has 'Accurate Audio Emulation'
    Citra, the impressive and quickly moving Nintendo 3DS emulator has a new progress report out and it sounds great. They've made some great progress on accurate audio emulation, with their new "LLE (Accurate)" option. They say this has enabled games like Pokémon X / Y, Fire Emblem Fates and Echoes and more to work. There's a downside though, that currently the performance does take quite a hit with it so they're still recommending the "HLE (Fast)" setting for now. They go into quite a lot of detail about how they got here, with plenty of bumps along the way. Most of the work towards this, was done by a single developer who suffered a bit of a burn-out over it.
  • Mindustry, an open source sandbox Tower Defense game that's a little like Factorio
    Available under the GPL, the developer originally made it for the GDL Metal Monstrosity Jam which happened back in 2017 and it ended up winning! Seems the developer didn't stop development after this, as they're currently going through a new major release with regular alpha builds.
  • Have graphical distortions in Unity games with NVIDIA? Here's a workaround
    It seems a lot of Unity games upgrading to later versions of Unity are suffering from graphical distortions on Linux with an NVIDIA GPU. There is a workaround available.

Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 Released With Just Over 800 Patches On Top Of Wine

Released on Friday was Wine 4.0-RC1 while coming out over the weekend was the Wine-Staging re-base that is carrying still over 800 patches on top of the upstream Wine code-base. Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 is available with 805 patches over what's found in the "vanilla" Wine code-base. But prior to the Wine 4.0 RC1 milestone there were a fair number of patches that were promoted upstream including ntoskrnl, WindowsCodecs, user32, and DXGI changes. Read more