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Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Council Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 10:46am
Story KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 10:45am
Story Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 10:43am
Story Graphics and Games: RandR and AMDGPU, Opus Magnum Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 10:40am
Story System 76 and Purism Laptops Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 10:38am
Story Ubuntu Leftovers: GNOME, Birthday and More Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 8:39am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 8:37am
Story Flint OS, an operating system for a cloud-first world Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 8:30am
Story Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Welcomes Unity Fans with New Mutiny Layout, Ships with Snaps Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 12:36am
Story MongoDB's successful IPO reflects its differences with traditional open source Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2017 - 12:33am

Red Hat reduces IoT tradeoffs and Asia Coverage

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Industry Spotlight: Red Hat reduces IoT tradeoffs

    Organizations rolling out the IoT usually aren’t prepared for the additional complexity. With the IoT, data volumes grow exponentially, infrastructure management gets more complicated and the security vulnerabilities increase disproportionately. Nevertheless, IT departments are expected to handle all these changes competently without proportional increases in budget or other resources.

  • Analyse Asia 211: Red Hat in Asia & Open Innovation Institute with Dirk-Peter van Leeuwen

    Dirk-Peter van Leeuwen, senior vice president & general manager at Redhat, Asia Pacific, joined us to discuss the company’s footprint across Asia and the recent launch of their new Open Innovation Institute in Singapore. We discuss how Asian companies are in different phases of digital transformation from culture to innovation and adjusting against digital disruption.

Samsung and Tizen: Bixby 2.0, Tizen 3.0, GNU/Linux on DeX

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu 17.10: What’s New? [Video]

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

It’s Artful Aardvark arrival day today (no, really!) and to mark the occasion we’ve made our first video in 3 years!

Prime your eyeballs and pop in some earbuds as we (try to) bring you up to speed on what’s new in Ubuntu 17.10.

At a smidgen over 3 minutes long we think our video is perfect for watching on your commute; when you’re bleary eyed in bed; or when you get the tl;dr feels thinking about our fuller, longer, and far wordier Ubuntu 17.10 review (due out shortly).

Read more

Radeon Linux Gaming Performance: Ubuntu 17.04 vs. Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With Ubuntu 17.10 set to ship tomorrow that features just not an upgraded Linux kernel and Mesa 3D stack but also transitions from Unity 7 + X.Org to GNOME Shell + Wayland, here are some comparison gaming benchmarks on a few different AMD Radeon graphics cards.

Ubuntu 17.04 shipped six months ago with Linux 4.10 and Mesa 17.0.7 as the main graphics components for open-source driver users while now with Ubuntu 17.10 is the Linux 4.13 kernel and Mesa 17.2.2. The six months of improvements to Mesa alone are massive for Intel and Radeon users with the RADV/ANV Vulkan drivers maturing much over this time (17.10 still doesn't ship with the Vulkan drivers, but are just a sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers away) as well as many performance improvements and new extensions for the growing number of bundled OpenGL drivers. If you read Phoronix daily, you should already be well versed on the many Mesa accomplishments over this time span.

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Linux on Galaxy is Samsung's most impressive DeX app yet

Filed under
Linux

Alongside the Galaxy S8/S8+, Samsung also introduced DeX to the world this past February. DeX is Samsung's vision for the future of desktop computing, and while it still has a way to go before it's truly useful or practical for everyone, Linux on Galaxy is a new app that Samsung hopes will make DeX more appealing to developers.

Samsung announced Linux on Galaxy at its developer conference on October 18, and although the app is still in a trial phase, it already sounds pretty impressive.

Read more

Also: Samsung unveils 'Linux on Galaxy' for DeX -- run Fedora and Ubuntu on your Note8?

Skylake embedded computer has a thin 1U profile

Filed under
Linux

Advantech has expanded its line of fanless, barebone EPC computers with a 43mm high “EPC-T1232” system based on a Skylake U-series thin Mini-ITX board.

In August, Advantech launched its Linux-ready AIMB-232 thin Mini-ITX SBC featuring 6th Gen “Skylake” U-Series CPUs. Now it has followed up with an EPC-T1232 barebone computer based on the SBC, or specifically, the AIMB-T12325W-00Y0E model. Like the SBC, the EPC-T1232 has a low profile, measuring 250 x 210 x 43mm.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software: VirtualBox, Franz, ClipGrab, Gammu, AppArmor, Xfce4, GTK+

Filed under
Software
  • Oracle Releases VM VirtualBox 5.2

    It was more than one year ago that VirtualBox 5.1 was released while today it's finally been succeeded by a new feature release.

  • Franz Combines all Your Messaging Apps in a Single Application

    Franz is a free to use application that combines different messaging services like WhatsApp, WeChat, Facebook Messenger, Gmail, Telegram, Skype, Slack and other chat applications in one application.

  • ClipGrab: Video Downloader and Converter Updated for Ubuntu/Linux Mint (PPA)

    ClipGrab is a free software to download and convert videos from different famous sites of Internet. You can easily save your favorite videos from sites like Dailymotion or Vimeo. And you can convert these videos into "usable" formats like WMV, MPEG or MP3. You can check here which sites are supported by this software.

  • Gammu 1.38.5

    Today, Gammu 1.38.5 has been released. After long period of bugfix only releases, this comes with several new noteworthy features.

  • Watch Out Upgrading To Linux 4.14 If You Use AppArmor

    Just a quick public service announcement if you rely upon AppArmor for security on your Linux distribution like Ubuntu/Debian and plan to soon upgrade to the Linux 4.14 kernel...

  • New hotness: xfce4-notifyd 0.4.0

    After quite some development time I have decided to push out xfce4-notifyd 0.4.0 today. This is not just a bugfix, but a feature-packed release.

  • Xfce Gets Notification Improvements With xfce4-notifyd 0.4

    For users of the Xfce4 desktop environment, a new release of xfce4-notifyd 0.4 is now available as the project's newest feature release.

  • GTK+ 3.92 Released With Many Improvements & New Features

    Matthias Clasen has today released GTK+ 3.92 as the latest test release in the long road towards the major GTK4 tool-kit update.

    GTK+ 3.92 features Vulkan improvements, more widget reworking, continued Emoji support, and more. Highlights of changes found in this GTK+ 3.92 update include:

  • SteelCloud Expands Linux STIG Support to Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux

    SteelCloud LLC announced today that it has enhanced ConfigOS, its patented STIG remediation software, to support the newly released Ubuntu, SUSE, and Oracle Linux STIGs. These new supported platforms bolster the product's existing Red Hat Linux automated STIG remediation capabilities. The expanded ConfigOS Linux security content will be provided to new and existing customers at no additional charge.

Linux and Graphics: AMD and AGL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Red Hat, Fleet Commander, and Fedora 27

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fleet Commander Now Ready To Deploy Fedora & RHEL Desktops At Scale

    Fleet Commander is now declared "production ready" by the Red Hat developers working on this software project for easing the process of deploying and managing Fedora/Red Hat desktops across a large number of systems.

    Fleet Commander builds off the Cockpit web-based administration tools and FreeIPA for making it easier for system administrators to deploy Fedora and Red Hat based systems on a large scale within an organization.

  • A Look At The New Features For Fedora 27

    Fedora 27 is now under its final freeze for release in the next few weeks so here's a recap of the prominent changes coming to this next installment of the Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution.

    First and foremost, the Fedora Workstation 27 release is making use of GNOME 3.26 and its many exciting improvements, many of which upstream improvements were worked on by Fedora / Red Hat developers. GNOME 3.26 offers better Wayland support, some HiDPI improvements, initial built-in screencast / remote desktop support through Mutter, the reworked GNOME Control Center UI, many app improvements, and more as outlined in that aforelinked article.

  • Is the Stock In Play?: Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT)

Android: New Devices

Filed under
Android
  • ZTE launches crazy, foldable, dual-screened smartphone

    Budget Android company ZTE is launching what has to be its craziest-looking smartphone ever, the Axon M. The M looks like someone took a Nintendo DS, removed the controls, and stuck two big smartphone screens on each side.

    The Axon M is a whopping 12.1mm thick. A hinge runs along the long side of the phone, and it opens up, just like a Nintendo DS. On each side of the phone, you get a 5.2-inch, 1080p TFT LCD. Open the whole thing up, and when combined the screens sort of become a 6.75-inch, 8:9 aspect ratio, 1920x2160 display. I say "sort of" because of course there's a big seam down the middle.

  • Google's Pixel 2 Earns High Marks in Spite of Dull Design

    As Google's new Pixel 2 smartphones get ready to hit the shelves, reviews of the models have begun mushrooming online.

    While the new phones generally have received positive grades, many reviewers found the their design boring.

    "The Pixel 2 hardware is ho-hum," observed Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy.

  •  

  • Surprise! The Pixel 2 is hiding a custom Google SoC for image processing

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • GMO Internet introduces open source KYC as blockchain project enters fifth phase
  • Eclipse Science Advances Open Source Technology for Scientific Research

    The Eclipse Science Working Group, a working group of the Eclipse Foundation, today announced the new releases of five open source projects used by the scientific research community to advance and simplify the software used by science projects, like genomic, astrophysics, nuclear simulations, etc. The new project releases are part of an annual release train that is managed by the Science WG.

  • Dmark East Africa to develop open source IT applications

    We have an operation around the region; in South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, Kenya and Rwanda. And this has exposed us to different levels of talent across the region.  As a result, we have come to a conclusion that Uganda has special talents in the area of information technology, specifically, product development or software engineering.

  • DevOps Jobs: 4 trends to watch
  • Amazon, PwC join campaign to bring open-source EMR to Puerto Rico in wake of Hurricane Maria

    The first phase of the campaign comprises immediate disaster response. The collaborators will deploy a version of the open-source cloud platform OpenEMR-Plus, which proved successful in response efforts after Hurricane Harvey in Houston. They will also provide supply chain assistance.

  • UK Startup Lifebit Builds on Popular Nextflow Open-Source Genomics Platform
  • Makerbot Labs Is One Step Toward Open Source 3D Printing

    3D printing feels a bit stuck. At the dawn of the 2010s, the device seemed destined to reimagine the creative process, putting the power of additive manufacturing within anyone's grasp. But trend has gone cold since reaching its popular zenith in 2013. While people continue to create amazing things with 3D printing, the "one in every household" promise has been put on temporary—or possibly permanent—hold.

    But the leader of the once great 3D printing revolution hasn't gone away quietly. In fact, it's done the opposite. Makerbot, the Brooklyn-based startup that sold its first printers back in 2009, is launching a brand new platform, Makerbot Labs, to help turn its 3D printing community into super-users, able to access parts of the printer that were otherwise inaccessible. Makerbot describes this new platform as a place, built for creators, who want to experiment with 3D printing but still have the bedrock of the platform to fall back on if need be.

  • IEEE to develop standard for automotive Ethernet of over 1 Gbps

    Industry body IEEE and the IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) announced the formation of a task force to develop IEEE P802.3ch—Standard for Ethernet physical layer specifications and management parameters for greater than 1 Gbps automotive Ethernet. The new standards development project aims to meet the demand for higher speed Ethernet in the automotive environment to support ongoing technological developments, such as connected cars, advanced driver assisted systems and infotainment systems.

CMS: Mass.gov Moves to Drupal, Voyager 1.0 is Out

Filed under
OSS
Web

Chrome and Mozilla

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Google Quietly Releases Chrome 62 to Stable Channel for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    Google quietly promoted the Chrome 62 web browser to the stable channel today for desktops, including Mac, GNU/Linux, and Microsoft Windows platforms.

  • Chrome 62 Promoted To Stable

    Google has released Chromium/Chrome 62 as the latest update to its widely-used web browser.

  • Chrome Working On JPEG Encode Accelerator With VA-API/V4L2 Support

    Landing in the Chromium browser code-base this morning is a JPEG encode accelerator interface.

  • Mozilla brings Microsoft, Google, the W3C, Samsung together to create cross-browser documentation on MDN

    Community contributions are at the core of MDN’s success. Thousands of volunteers have helped build and refine MDN over the past 12 years. In this year alone, 8,021 users made 76,203 edits, greatly increasing the scope and quality of the content. Cross-browser documentation contributions include input from writers at Google and Microsoft; Microsoft writers have made more than 5,000 edits so far in 2017. This cross-browser collaboration adds valuable content on browser compatibility and new features of the web platform. Going forward, Microsoft writers will focus their Web API documentation efforts on MDN and will redirect relevant pages from Microsoft Developer Network to MDN.

  • A Week-Long Festival for Internet Health

    Says Mark Surman, Mozilla’s Executive Director: “The Internet is layered into our lives like we never could have imagined. Access is no longer a luxury — it’s a fundamental part of 21st century life. A virus is no longer a nuisance consigned to a single terminal — it’s an existential threat that can disrupt hospitals, governments and entire cities.”

    But much of the Internet’s best nature is flourishing, too. Each day, new communities form despite members being separated by whole continents. Start-ups and artists have access to a global stage. And open-source projects put innovation and inclusion ahead of profit.

FUD and Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft never disclosed 2013 hack of secret vulnerability database

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Hackers broke into Microsoft's secret, internal bug-tracking database and stole information related to vulnerabilities that were exploited in later attacks. But the software developer never disclosed the breach, Reuters reported, citing former company employees.

In an article published Tuesday, Reuters said Microsoft's decision not to disclose details came after an internal review concluded the exploits used in later attacks could have been discovered elsewhere. That investigation relied, in part, on automated reports Microsoft receives when its software crashes. The problem with that approach, Reuters pointed out, is that advanced computer attacks are written so carefully they rarely cause crashes.

Reuters said Microsoft discovered the database breach in early 2013, after a still-unknown hacking group broke into computers belonging to a raft of companies. Besides Microsoft, the affected companies included Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. As reported at the time, the hackers infected a website frequented by software developers with attack code that exploited a zero-day vulnerability in Oracle's Java software framework. When employees of the targeted companies visited the site, they became infected, too.

Read more

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Plasma 5.11 – Keep the momentum going

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Just a few short days ago, the KDE team released Plasma 5.11, the latest edition of this desktop environment, plied with a range of bug fixes as well as some new features. Reason enough to celebrate, but even more so when you consider the fact that Plasma has been slowly, steadily – and consistently – improving over the past few years.

For me, the culmination of this effort is my great satisfaction with Plasma – epitomized in the shape and form of Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zoltan, including the most excellent twining of the distro with my HP Pavilion laptop. And on this very machine, I will be testing the KDE neon live edition, furnished with the latest desktop version. So let’s see what it does.

Read more

Also: GCompris at KDE-edu sprint 2017

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.

LWN on Linux: LTS, API, Pointer Leaks and Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Cramming features into LTS kernel releases
    While the 4.14 development cycle has not been the busiest ever (12,500 changesets merged as of this writing, slightly more than 4.13 at this stage of the cycle), it has been seen as a rougher experience than its predecessors. There are all kinds of reasons why one cycle might be smoother than another, but it is not unreasonable to wonder whether the fact that 4.14 is a long-term support (LTS) release has affected how this cycle has gone. Indeed, when he released 4.14-rc3, Linus Torvalds complained that this cycle was more painful than most, and suggested that the long-term support status may be a part of the problem. A couple of recent pulls into the mainline highlight the pressures that, increasingly, apply to LTS releases. As was discussed in this article, the 4.14 kernel will include some changes to the kernel timer API aimed at making it more efficient, more like contemporary in-kernel APIs, and easier to harden. While API changes are normally confined to the merge window, this change was pulled into the mainline for the 4.14-rc3 release. The late merge has led to a small amount of grumbling in the community.
  • Improving the kernel timers API
    The kernel's timer interface has been around for a long time, and its API shows it. Beyond a lack of conformance with current in-kernel interface patterns, the timer API is not as efficient as it could be and stands in the way of ongoing kernel-hardening efforts. A late addition to the 4.14 kernel paves the way toward a wholesale change of this API to address these problems.
  • What's the best way to prevent kernel pointer leaks?
    An attacker who seeks to compromise a running kernel by overwriting kernel data structures or forcing a jump to specific kernel code must, in either case, have some idea of where the target objects are in memory. Techniques like kernel address-space layout randomization have been created in the hope of denying that knowledge, but that effort is wasted if the kernel leaks information about where it has been placed in memory. Developers have been plugging pointer leaks for years but, as a recent discussion shows, there is still some disagreement over the best way to prevent attackers from learning about the kernel's address-space layout. There are a number of ways for a kernel pointer value to find its way out to user space, but the most common path by far is the printk() function. There are on the order of 50,000 printk() calls in the kernel, any of which might include the value of a kernel pointer. Other places in the kernel use the underlying vsprintf() mechanism to format data for virtual files; they, too, often leak pointer values. A blanket ban on printing pointer values could solve this problem — if it could be properly enforced — but it would also prevent printing such values when they are really needed. Debugging kernel problems is one obvious use case for printing pointers, but there are others.
  • Continuous-integration testing for Intel graphics
    Two separate talks, at two different venues, give us a look into the kinds of testing that the Intel graphics team is doing. Daniel Vetter had a short presentation as part of the Testing and Fuzzing microconference at the Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC). His colleague, Martin Peres, gave a somewhat longer talk, complete with demos, at the X.Org Developers Conference (XDC). The picture they paint is a pleasing one: there is lots of testing going on there. But there are problems as well; that amount of testing runs afoul of bugs elsewhere in the kernel, which makes the job harder. Developing for upstream requires good testing, Peres said. If the development team is not doing that, features that land in the upstream kernel will be broken, which is not desirable. Using continuous-integration (CI) along with pre-merge testing allows the person making a change to make sure they did not break anything else in the process of landing their feature. That scales better as the number of developers grows and it allows developers to concentrate on feature development, rather than bug fixing when someone else finds the problem. It also promotes a better understanding of the code base; developers learn more "by breaking stuff", which lets them see the connections and dependencies between different parts of the code.

An update on GnuPG

The GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG) is one of the fundamental tools that allows a distributed group to have trust in its communications. Werner Koch, lead developer of GnuPG, spoke about it at Kernel Recipes: what's in the new 2.2 version, when older versions will reach their end of life, and how development will proceed going forward. He also spoke at some length on the issue of best-practice key management and how GnuPG is evolving to assist. It is less than three years since attention was focused on the perilous position of GnuPG; because of systematic failure of the community to fund its development, Koch was considering packing it all in. The Snowden revelations persuaded him to keep going a little longer, then in the wake of Heartbleed there was a resurgent interest in funding the things we all rely on. Heartbleed led to the founding of the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII). A grant from CII joined commitments from several companies and other organizations and an upsurge in community funding has put GnuPG on a more secure footing going forward. Read more

Ubuntu: GNOME, New Video, Ubuntu Podcast, Refreshing the Xubuntu Logo

  • Ubuntu 17.10: We're coming GNOME! Plenty that's Artful in Aardvark, with a few Wayland wails
    Ubuntu has done a good job of integrating a few plugins that improve GNOME's user experience compared to stock GNOME – most notably a modified version of the Dash-to-Dock and the App Indicator extensions, which go a long way toward making GNOME a bit more like Unity. It's worth noting that Ubuntu's fork of Dash-to-Dock lacks some features of the original, but you can uninstall the Ubuntu version in favour of the original if you prefer. In fact you can really revert to a pretty stock GNOME desktop with just a few tweaks. Canonical said it wasn't going to heavily modify GNOME and indeed it hasn't.
  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E33 – Aggressive Judicious Frame
    This week we’ve been protecting our privacy with LineageOS and playing Rust. Telegram get fined, your cloud is being used to mine BitCoin, Google announces a new privacy focused product tier, North Korea hacks a UK TV studio, a new fully branded attack vector is unveiled and Purism reach their funding goal for the Librem 5.
  • Refreshing the Xubuntu logo
    Earlier this year I worked a bit with our logo to propose a small change to it – first change to the logo in 5 years. The team approved, but for various reasons the new logo did not make it to 17.10. Now we’re ready to push it out to the world.