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Tuesday, 17 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GNOME: Pitivi, Gitlab CI, Flatpak and Mutter

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GNOME
  • Harish Fulara: [GSoC 2018] Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 4

    The next and the last task under “Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi” as per my GSoC project is to integrate project thumbnails in recent projects list. I am currently working on this task and hope to finish it by next week.

  • Application screenshots with Gitlab CI

    The fresh new tooling used for development in the GNOME project (gitlab, meson, docker, flatpak) has a lots of potential

  • Matthias Clasen: The Flatpak BoF at Guadec

    Here is a quick summary of the Flatpak BoF that happened last week at Guadec.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Is En Route For Linux App Sandboxing & Easy Program Distribution

    At the recent GUADEC 2018 conference in Spain, GNOME developers plotted the imminent Flatpak 1.0 release as well as what's coming after the big 1.0 milestone.

  • More Mutter Performance Tuning Work Landing For GNOME 3.30

    GNOME 3.30 is looking like Mutter will be quite fit with the ability to remove its dependence on X11 code and various performance tuning optimizations. On top of already landed performance work in recent months, more optimizations have just landed and it looks like more could still be on the way.

    Most recently, as of this morning, this two month old GitLab request was merged about re-using paint volumes. From the last commit it explains, "Cuts down approximately all paint volume calculations when there's windows that redraw frequently, but don't move."

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0

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KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0

    July 14, 2018. KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0.

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.48 Brings KWayland Fixes & Many Other Improvements

    KDE Frameworks 5.48 is now the latest monthly update to this collection of add-on libraries complementing Qt5.

Security Leftovers

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Security

A Second Preview to the Next elementary OS 5.0 (July 2018)

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Reviews

Here's a second short preview (after the March 2018 one) to the next 5.0 version of elementary OS from the development release. We're getting closer to final now as the Beta 1 has been released and the Beta 2 has been started but it's still not recommended to install or use the Betas. This means do not upgrade to Beta 1 or Beta 2 yet, nor install the Beta, but wait until the final version officially released. To sum it up, in 5.0, the user interface is getting more cool with tons of improvement; and the AppCenter is really amazing with payment system for both developers who deserve funds and users who want to contribute. I also mention how active the development progress is below and how we can help. This preview is very brief and cannot represent the final as the final could have more and more amazing additions. Anyway, wait for the final and enjoy reading!

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Vulkan vs. OpenGL Performance For Linux Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It has been a while since last publishing some Linux GPU driver benchmarks focused explicitly on the OpenGL vs. Vulkan performance, but that changed today with a fresh look at the performance between these two Khronos graphics APIs when tested with AMD and NVIDIA hardware on the latest RadeonSI/RADV and NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates

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Security
Debian

Coming four months after the previous point release, Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" includes a total of 100 security update and 91 miscellaneous bugfixes for various core components and applications. However, this remains a point release and doesn't represent a new version of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, which continues to be updated every day.

"This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included," reads today's announcement.

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Also: Debian 9.5 Released With Security Fixes, Updated Intel Microcode For Spectre V2

Updated Debian 9: 9.5 released

Games and Wine Leftover

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Gaming

Open Cars Kick-Off Conference

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OSS

Autonomous cars are coming. But how are we going to deal with keeping both the software and hardware up-to-date? Odds are, a three-year computer and software a few months old are going to be too old to drive autonomously, at least while the technology is in its infancy. And how do we train the guys in your local garage to maintain an AI?

The automobile industry thinks they have a solution: lease rather than sell autonomous cars, lock the hood shut, and maintain them exclusively through their dealers.

That works great for the 1%. But what about the rest of us? The folks who drive a dented, 10-year-old car? We should have the option to drive autonomous cars, and to participate in the same world as the more wealthy folks.

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Lubuntu 18.04 Review: Stable and Dependable As Always

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Reviews
Ubuntu

I stated earlier that 18.04 looks pretty much the same compared to when I first installed it. This is not a bad thing. Lubuntu is not designed to be flashy or to have the latest cutting-edge features. It is designed to use few resources and run well on a wide variety of computers. It does that very well. You could set anyone who ever used Windows in front of a Lubuntu box and they would be good to go. I would certainly recommend it for beginners and older computers

One thing that was confusing when I was researching this article was the existence of more than one site for Lubuntu. When I searched for Lubuntu, one of the first search result entries was for lubuntu.net. I thought it was the project’s official website. Then, I was surfing through Lubuntu’s Wikipedia entry. It listed lubuntu.me as the official site. Both look very official. It’s only after you dig that you discover that lubuntu.net was created by “Free and Open Source contributors from Asia, Linux Fans and the Lubuntu Meilix community”. It’s essentially a fan site. They had better let people know that they are not the official site before they get in trouble with someone.

Have you ever used Lubuntu? What is your favorite Ubuntu flavor? Please let us know in the comments below.

If you found this article interesting, please take a minute to share it on social media.

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Lubuntu 18.04 Review: Stable and Dependable As Always

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Reviews

Ubuntu’s lightweight edition Lubuntu 18.04 still revives older computers through LXDE but it has different plans for future. Read the Lubuntu 18.04 review to find out more about it.
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Xbox 360 Wireless Controller for PC+Rocket League+Ubuntu=Awesome

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Gaming
Ubuntu
HowTos

I’m a gamer. I’ve been playing PC games since DOS, and have no plan to ever stop, thankfully there are an increasing number of wicked games available on GNU/Linux systems, like Rocket League for example.

If you’ve been living under a rock for the past few years, and have no idea what Rocket League is, it’s basically Soccer/Football (other game modes have other sports, etc, but the primary focus is as mentioned) in super high powered, jet propulsed cars; it’s awesome. However, Rocket League is not very easily played via keyboard, and having some kind of controller is essential.

I use an Xbox 360 Wireless Controller as my primary controller when playing games that support one on Linux.

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat

The Best Linux VPNs of 2018

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GNU
Linux

If the 20th century was defined by an explosive growth in technology, then the 21st century is beginning to be defined by personal security, or more pointedly, a lack thereof. Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), once mainly a site-to-site connection tool for IT professionals, have evolved to become personal services that let individual users connect to the internet by using encrypted traffic that prevents third parties from snooping on their web activities.

This VPN evolution occurred because it has become increasingly easy for hackers to exploit constantly changing operating systems (OSes), applications, and networks. This means sophisticated tactics, such as man-in-the-middle attacks, aren't just being aimed at businesses anymore. It's happening to everyday folks who are frequenting their favorite coffee shop. This means these folks need to upgrade their security arsenal.

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OSS: BI, GraphQL, and "Pydio Cells, an Enterprise-Focused File-Sharing Solution"

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OSS
  • Best open source business intelligence and analytics tools

    So what are some open source alternatives to these proprietary tools? And aside from cost what benefits can they bring? Here's our pick of the market.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: GraphQL Engine from Hasura

    With its open source release this week, GraphQL-as-a-Service company Hasura’s GraphQL Engine is looking to lift the burden on front-end and enterprise application developers who want to begin incorporating GraphQL’s data querying and manipulation capabilities in their preexisting Postgres-based applications without having to dig through the back-end of GraphQL’s code to implement it.

    ”GraphQL and the tooling around it dramatically increases the feature velocity for developer teams by reducing the communication required between them while developing new features,” the company wrote in this week’s announcement. “As a result, GraphQL servers are like self-documenting APIs that enable full API discoverability for the developers. This enables the front-end developers to make API requests, in order to introduce new features or change existing ones, in GraphQL without having to wait for back-end developer teams to deliver APIs and document the changes.”

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: Pydio Cells, an Enterprise-Focused File-Sharing Solution

    Pydio Cells is a brand-new product focused on the needs of enterprises and large organizations, brought to you from the people who launched the concept of the open-source file sharing and synchronization solution in 2008. The concept behind Pydio Cells is challenging: to be to file sharing what Slack has been to chats—that is, a revolution in terms of the number of features, power and ease of use.

    In order to reach this objective, Pydio's development team has switched from the old-school development stack (Apache and PHP) to Google's Go language to overcome the bottleneck represented by legacy technologies. Today, Pydio Cells offers a faster, more scalable microservice architecture that is in tune with dynamic modern enterprise environments.

    In fact, Pydio's new "Cells" concept delivers file sharing as a modern collaborative app. Users are free to create flexible group spaces for sharing based on their own ways of working with dedicated in-app messaging for improved collaboration.

    In addition, the enterprise data management functionality gives both companies and administrators reassurance, with controls and reporting that directly answer corporate requirements around the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and other tightening data protection regulations.

Programming: Becoming a Senior Developer, DWG and a "New Phase" of Python

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Development
  • Becoming a senior developer: 9 experiences you'll encounter

    Being a developer—a good one—isn't just about writing code. To be successful, you do a lot of planning, you deal with catastrophes, and you prevent catastrophes. Not to mention you spend plenty of time working with other humans about what your code should do.

  • Revealing unknown DWG classes

    I implemented three major buzzwords today in some trivial ways.

        massive parallel processing
        asynchronous processing
        machine-learning: a self-improving program

    The problem is mostly trivial, and the solutions also. I need to
    reverse-engineer a binary closed file-format, but got some hints from
    a related ASCII file-format, DWG vs DXF.

  • Python and Its Community Enter a New Phase

    Python is an amazing programming language, there's no doubt about it. >From humble beginnings in 1991, it's now just about everywhere. Whether you're doing web development, system administration, test automation, devops or data science, odds are good that Python is playing a role in your work.

    Even if you're not using Python directly, odds are good that it is being used behind the scenes. Using OpenStack? Python plays an integral role in its development and configuration. Using Dropbox on your computer? Then you've got a copy of Python running on your computer. Using Linux? When I purchased Red Hat Linux back in 1995, the configuration was a breeze—thanks to visual tools developed in Python.

    And, of course, there are numerous schools and educational programs that are now teaching Python. MIT's intro computer science course switched several years ago from Scheme to Python, and thousands of universities all over the world made a similar switch in its wake. My 15-year-old daughter participates in a program for technology and entrepreneurship—and she's learning Python.

    There currently is an almost insatiable demand for Python developers. Indeed, Stack Overflow reported last year that Python is not only the most popular language on its site, but it's also the fastest-growing language. I can attest to this popularity in my own job as a freelance Python trainer. Some of the largest computer companies in the world are now using Python on a regular basis, and their use of the language is growing, not shrinking.

Games: Egosoft, We Happy Few, Firefox for Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Egosoft have confirmed that X4: Foundations will be on Linux

    Fantastic news for fans of Egosoft space simulation games, as they have now actually confirmed that X4: Foundations [Official Site] will be on Linux.

  • We Happy Few has a brand new trailer out

    We Happy Few, the action adventure from Compulsion Games and Gearbox Publishing looks rather promising in the brand new trailer.

  • Get your game on, in the browser

    The web is a gamer’s dream. It works on any device, can connect players across the globe, and can run a ton of games—from classic arcade games to old-school computer games. The web could be the best platform for gaming, and Firefox is the the best browser for gaming. Here’s why.

    [...]

    Firefox is the fastest and most efficient browser for gaming. Don’t believe us? Try out some of these games and see for yourself:

    The Internet Archive Mac Software Library – Do you miss those black-and-white games you used to play on your old Macintosh? The Internet Archive has worked to preserve many older, classic computer games so now you can play them in your browser.

    http://slither.io/ – This is a fun, MMO Snake-like game with good graphics, is in-browser, and also happens to have a really good Privacy Policy (we’re into stuff like that).

    Battlestar Galactica Online – Who’s a Cylon? Are you a Cylon? Find out.

    LEGO Online – Playing with LEGO IRL is awesome, but the toy maker has made some of the best console and computer games in the past decade. Now you can play some of them online.

  • Wine Lands Support For Vulkan On macOS Via MoltenVK

    CodeWeavers' Andrew Eikum has added support to Wine for using Vulkan on macOS via the open-source MoltenVK.

    As what should mature into a big boost for allowing Vulkan-enabled Windows games to run faster on macOS by mapping it through to Apple's Metal API, and also should ultimately allow the use of DXVK for Direct3D 11 over Vulkan or VKD3D for Direct3D 12 over Vulkan, the "winemac" code now has this initial Vulkan support using the MoltenVK wrapper.

AMD Graphics: AMDKFD, AMDGPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Raven Ridge Support Posted For AMDKFD Compute Driver

    Felix Kuehling of AMD sent out the remaining six patches for getting the AMD Raven Ridge (Ryzen APUs) working with the AMDKFD kernel compute driver so that the ROCm/OpenCL user-space compute stack can be run on these new APUs.

  • Radeon RX Vega Display Regression Fix Heading To Linux 4.18 Git

    If you have been part of the group of Radeon RX Vega Linux users trying out Linux 4.18 and finding your display no longer lights up, heading to Linux 4.18 Git should be a fix for at least some of the users.

    Sent out on Friday was a batch of AMDGPU DRM-Fixes-4.18. It's just three fixes, but two of them are pertaining to display problems and the other a segmentation fault if the GPU does not power up properly when resuming the system.

today's howtos

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HowTos

Find Snap Apps Faster Using This Online Store

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Ubuntu

When you want to find or install a Snap app you’re supposed to head to Ubuntu Software, which is part of the default Ubuntu desktop.

But if I’m being honest Ubuntu Software sucks. It’s slow. The layout isn’t great for discovery. And Ubuntu’s instance on listing (often irrelevant) Snap apps at the top of any and all search results muddies its use as a competent cross-format app hub.

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