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Monday, 16 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4 Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 6:36am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 6:23am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 2:16am
Story Linux Kernel/Foundation Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 2:15am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 2:09am
Story Nintendo Found a Way to Patch an Unpatchable Coldboot Exploit in Nintendo Switch Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:47am
Story Winds – RSS and Podcast software created using React / Redux / Node Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:44am
Story GNOME: Pitivi, Gitlab CI, Flatpak and Mutter Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:34am
Story Release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0 Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:31am
Story Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates Rianne Schestowitz 1 15/07/2018 - 1:25am

ARM Takes Down Its Website That Attacked Open-Source Rival

Filed under
Hardware

ARM, the incredibly successful developer of CPU designs, appears to be getting a little nervous about an open-source rival that’s gaining traction. At the end of June, ARM launched a website outlining why it’s better than its competitor’s offerings and it quickly blew up in its face. Realising the site was a bad look, ARM has now taken it down.

For the uninitiated, ARM Holdings designs various architectures and cores that it licenses to major chipmakers around the world. Its tech can be found in over 100 billion chips manufactured by huge names like Apple and Nvidia as well as many other lesser-known players in the low-power market. If ARM is Windows, you can think of RISC-V as an early Linux. Like ARM, it’s an architecture based on reduced instruction set computing (RISC), but it’s free to use and open to anyone to contribute or modify. While ARM has been around since 1991, RISC-V just got started in 2010 but it’s gaining a lot of ground and ARM’s pitiful website could easily be seen as a legitimising moment for the tech.

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Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi SBCs Is Making a Comeback Soon, Better Than Ever

In July 2016, Callahan wrote to us that he is looking for new team members to join his project to continue full-scale work on Chromium OS for SBCs. Unfortunately, that didn't happen as a few months after the announcement we published back then, Flint Innovations Limited informed us that Chromium OS for SBCs was forked into Flint OS.

Flint Innovations had some big plans for Flint OS, supporting not only Raspberry Pi boards, but also x86 computers with Intel and Nvidia GPUs, and also promised to let users run Android apps, a Google initiative that's now mainstream on Chrome OS and already supported by most Chromebooks out there. In March 2018, Flint OS was bought by Neverware.

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Fedora on the UDOO Neo

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware
HowTos

The core support for the i.MX6SX SoC and the UDOO Neo is pretty reasonable, with the MMC fixes it’s been very stable, all the core bits are working as expected, included wired and wireless network, thermal, cpufreq, crypto and it looks like the display should work fine. There’s a few quirks that I need to investigate further which should provide for a fun evening or weekend hacking. There has also been recently merged support for the i.MX6SX Cortex-M4 land upstream in Zephyr upstream for the 1.13 release, so getting that running and communication using Open-AMP between Fedora and Zephyr should also be an interesting addition. I think this will be a welcome addition to Fedora 29, and not a moment too soon!!

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Empowering Linux Developers for the New Wave of Innovation

Filed under
Ubuntu

Machine learning and IoT in particular offer huge opportunities for developers, especially those facing the crowded markets of other platforms, to engage with a sizeable untapped audience.

That Linux is open source makes it an amazing breeding ground for innovation. Developers aren’t constrained by closed ecosystems, meaning that Linux has long been the operating system of choice for developers. So by engaging with Linux, businesses can attract the best available developer skills.

The Linux ecosystem has always strived for a high degree of quality. Historically it was the Linux community taking sole responsibility for packaging software, gating each application update with careful review to ensure it worked as advertised on each distribution of Linux. This proved difficult for all sides.

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CentOS & Flatpak - Are we there yet?

Filed under
Red Hat

I like the approach. I really do. It's sensible, it's practical, it's the right thing for ordinary people, and it can help avoid dependency nightmares when one little library breaks and then the damage propagates across the entire distro stack. But for the time being, the standalone app mechanisms aren't robust enough, and my latest CentOS escapade with Flatpak shows it. Not bad but needs improvement.

Specifically, installations should be entirely GUI - no fiddling - and if the GUI package managers in this or that distro can't handle it, then Flatpak ought to provide its own frontend. There should be no games with command line and ugly dot separated package names. Programs ought to work seamlessly - and be equivalent in quality and capabilities to the ordinary repo stock. Finally, the question of fragmentation remains, because if we end with a dozen Snap-like or Flatpak-like tools, we haven't really done anything. You should try Flatpak in your CentOS, and you will be able to grab some nice and cool applications, but be aware that the experience is still rough, and the road to seamless fun is still long. Take care.

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

96-core NanoPi Fire3 cluster computer blows past RPi rigs in benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Cluster computer projects are increasingly looking beyond the Raspberry Pi to build devices with faster cluster-friendly SBCs. Here’s a 96-core monster that taps the octa-core NanoPi Fire3.

Cluster computers constructed of Raspberry Pi SBCs have been around for years, ranging from supercomputer-like behemoths to simple hobbyist rigs. More recently, we’ve seen cluster designs that use other open-spec hacker boards, many of which offer higher computer power and faster networking at the same or lower price. Farther below, we’ll examine one recent open source design from Paul Smith at Climbers.net that combines 12 octa-core NanoPi-Fire3 SBCs for a 96-core cluster.

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Also: Low-profile Apollo Lake Mini-ITX board runs Linux

Software: gksu Alternatives, bootiso and Yay

Filed under
Software
  • Opening Graphical Application with Root Permission – gksu Alternatives in Ubuntu 18.04

    Recently, Ubuntu 18.04 removed gksu from its repositories, causing panic in anyone who relied on the utility on a regular basis. What many people didn’t realize, though, was gksu hadn’t been maintained in a long time. It was already a dead program. Ubuntu finally just made the move to cut ties with it.

  • bootiso: Easy ISO To Bootable USB Drive From The Command Line

    If you're looking for a command line tool that is able to create a bootable USB drive from both hybrid and non-hybrid ISO images (it should work with any Linux distribution ISO as well as Microsoft Windows ISO files), with some safety checks in place, you may want to give Bootiso a try.

  • Yay – Yet Another Reliable AUR Helper Written In Go

    Howdy Arch Users! I’ve got a good news for you. Today, I stumbled upon yet another reliable AUR helper called “Yay”. Yep! the name of this AUR helper is Yay. In the past, I was using Pacaur for installing AUR packages. It did a great job and I really liked it. I have also used some other AUR helpers such as Packer and Yaourt as well. But, they are all now discontinued and not recommended to use anymore. After reading about Yay features, I thought to give “Yay” a try and see how things works. So, here we go!

Security: Defective Processors, Malicious Proprietary Software and Cost of Bad Software

Filed under
Security

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Trisquel 8.0 LTS Review: Successful Freedom of 2018

Filed under
Reviews

Trisquel 8.0 is a success in reaching freedom goal (meaning: no proprietary at all) for overall computer users, especially desktop. It is a 100% free distro which is complete, user friendly, and instant. Compared to regular distros, it's at least equally low in requirements but high in usability; compared to common free distros, it's active (not dormant) and long-standing (since 2007). This operating system can be used by general computer users, produced in mass computers (i.e. sold in a PC/laptop), and especially software freedom people. This year, 2018, anybody wants the true free distro would be happy with Trisquel.

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Kube 0.7.0 is out!

Filed under
KDE
Software

While we remain committed to building a first class email experience we’re starting to venture a little beyond that with calendaring, while keeping our eyes focused on the grander vision of a tool that isn’t just yet another email client, but an assistant that helps you manage communication, time and tasks.

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Support increases for ETSI’s Open Source MANO

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

Implementing NFV was always going to be a challenge for telcos and their vendor and integrator partners, more so with actually getting services into operation. Even if we leave aside the herculean task on onboarding VNFs, one of the biggest concerns has been orchestration. Constant network changes caused by the dynamic and agile architecture of NFV needs to be managed automatically by orchestrators.

For telcos, there are two different initiatives that are driving the management of network orchestration – and whilst, at times, they have been viewed as competitive, current thinking tends to place them as complementary (it all depends to whom you talk).

Back in 2016, ETSI created the Open Source MANO (management and network orchestration) industry standards group, built on the back of its ground-breaking efforts to develop a standards framework for telco NFV. Meanwhile, the Linux Foundation is investing huge amounts of time and resources on its ONAP project (open network automation platform), after AT&T released its ECOMP work to open source and it merged with the China-led OPEN-O.

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Also: News of Note—ZTE closing in on lifting U.S. ban; ETSI OSM tops century mark for membership and more

Games: Warhammer 40,000, Turok 2: Seeds of Evil, Armed and Gelatinous

Filed under
Gaming

Python language founder steps down

Filed under
Development
  • ​Python language founder steps down

    After almost 30 years of overseeing the development of the world's most popular language, Python, its founder and "Benevolent Dictator For Life" (BDFL), Guido van Rossum, has decided he would like to remove myself entirely from the decision process.

    Van Rossum isn't leaving Python entirely. He said, "I'll still be there for a while as an ordinary core dev, and I'll still be available to mentor people -- possibly more available."

  • Guido van Rossum resigns as Python leader

    Python creator and Benevolent Leader for Life Guido van Rossum has decided, in the wake of the difficult PEP 572 discussion, to step down from his leadership of the project.

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More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4 Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 6:36am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 6:23am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 2:16am
Story Linux Kernel/Foundation Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 2:15am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 2:09am
Story Nintendo Found a Way to Patch an Unpatchable Coldboot Exploit in Nintendo Switch Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:47am
Story Winds – RSS and Podcast software created using React / Redux / Node Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:44am
Story GNOME: Pitivi, Gitlab CI, Flatpak and Mutter Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:34am
Story Release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0 Roy Schestowitz 15/07/2018 - 1:31am
Story Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates Rianne Schestowitz 1 15/07/2018 - 1:25am