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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Should Your Business Switch to Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

I've had the pleasure of talking with small business owners in the past about moving their business over to open source technologies. I've also heard officers of major corporations speak on the same topic, typically in a conference setting.

The overall point that was shared between the two business types is that in order to switch an enterprise environment to a completely different enterprise environment (software specifically), there needs to be a cause or an identifiable reason why switching to open source software makes sense.

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Best Linux Distro for Programming

Filed under
Linux

Linux-based operating systems (often called Linux Distributions, or just Distros) are quite popular among programmers and developers since their announcement in the 90s. The Linux kernel itself is designed to be flexible and open for modifications and contributions, thus it can run on any hardware. The same principle is applied to almost the whole software stack above the kernel that constitutes the Linux Distribution as a complete product. In general, it is designed from programmers for programmers and freely available to everyone.

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96Boards CE Extended SBC runs Linux or AOSP on Kirin 970

Filed under
Linux

Lenovator has opened $299 pre-orders on LeMaker’s 96Boards CE Extended “HiKey 970” SBC, which offers an octa-core Kirin 970 SoC, 6GB LPDDR4, 64GB UFS storage, wireless, GbE, M.2, and CAN.

The HiKey 970 was partially unveiled in March by Linaro as part of its joint announcement of a 96Boards.ai program for unleashing the potential of AI technology on Arm SoCs. The LeMaker version of the HiKey 970 — the board will also be offered by Hoperun — is now available for presale for $299 by Lemaker distributor Lenovator, with shipments due by the end of April.

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Microsoft Linux, Linux 4.17, and Linux 5.0

Filed under
Linux
  • Microsoft built its own custom Linux kernel for its new IoT service [Ed: After Microsoft repeatedly violated the GPL and while Microsoft is blackmailing companies for using Linux. The 'new Microsoft': we exploit you while we attack you while lying about it and paying those who would otherwise complain about it.]

    At a small press event in San Francisco, Microsoft today announced the launch of a secure end-to-end IoT product that focuses on microcontroller-based devices — the kind of devices that use tiny and relatively low-powered microcontrollers (MCUs) for basic control or connectivity features. Typically, these kinds of devices, which could be anything from a toy to a household gadget or an industrial application, don’t often get updated and hence, security often suffers.

  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Linux 4.17 Development, Teases the Linux 5.0 Release

    Two weeks after the launch of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds kicked off the development cycle of the Linux 4.17 kernel series by releasing the first Release Candidate (RC) build.

    At the end of every Linux kernel development cycle, the merge window opens for the next release, in this case, Linux 4.17. Now, two weeks later, the merge window is closed, and public testers can start downloading, compiling, and installing the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Linus Torvalds says Linux kernel v5.0 'should be meaningless'

    Following the release of Linux kernel 4.16, Linus Torvalds has said that the next kernel will be version 5.0. Or maybe it won't, because version numbers are meaningless.

    The announcement -- of sorts -- came in Torvalds' message over the weekend about the first release candidate for version 4.17. He warns that it is not "shaping up to be a particularly big release" and questions whether it even matters what version number is slapped on the final release.

Mozilla: Extensions, 'Things'. Firefox DevEdition, WebRender, Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Apply to Join the Featured Extensions Advisory Board

    Are you an extensions enthusiast? Do you want to help people find excellent ways to improve their browsing experience? If so, please consider applying to join our Featured Extensions Community Board!

    Every six months, we assemble a small group of dedicated community members to help nominate and select new featured extensions for addons.mozilla.org (AMO) each month. Their picks help millions of Firefox users discover top-quality extensions.

  • Build your own web things with the Things Framework

    A web thing has a Web Thing Description which describes the device’s capabilities, and exposes a Web Thing REST API and/or WebSocket API, so that it can be monitored and controlled. The Thing Description provides machine-readable metadata about a device and its available properties, actions and events. The Web Thing API lets a client read and write its properties, request actions and subscribe to its events.

    You can get started today by turning Android things into web things using our Java web thing library, or if you prefer to build things with Python or NodeJS, we also have you covered there. We have some early examples of how to build web things using WiFi-enabled microcontrollers like the ESP8266, and a serial gateway adapter for chipsets with more constrained resources. We’re releasing these libraries at a very early stage of development so that you can provide us with feedback and help us to help you build better web things.

    In the coming days we’ll be blogging about how to use each of these new web thing libraries, to help you get hands-on building your own devices.

    These are still experimental technologies in the process of standardisation at the W3C, but we hope our early open source implementations will help developers try out the Web of Things and help us to improve it.

  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14, April 20th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, April 20th, we are organizing Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Search Suggestions, Site Storage Redesign UI and Web Compatibility.

  • WebRender newsletter #18

    WebRender’s 18th newsletter is here, with its usual share of bug fixes and a few performance improvements. Just after the previous newsletter was published, Patrick Walton landed an experimental integration of pathfinder’s text renderer in WebRender, that can draw native-looking text on Mac using the GPU. The pathfinder integration is taking shape although it is behind a compile time flag for now and there’s some work left to support native-looking text on Windows and Linux.

  • Rust pattern: Rooting an Rc handle

    I’ve decided to do a little series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (Cool how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.

Graphics: XDC2018, Texas Instrument, Vulkan, Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 Milestone 3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA & Valve Are Among Those Backing X.Org's XDC2018

    This year's X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) has already received some big name sponsors.

    XDC2018 is happening in La Coruña, Spain with the event being organized by the Igalia folks who are also the platinum sponsors for the event. XDC2018 is running from 26 to 28 September and is the annual gathering of X.Org / Mesa / Libinput / Wayland developers to discuss development efforts and big ticket items to be worked on over the year ahead.

  • TI Posts Open-Source DRI3 WSEGL Plug-In For PowerVR SGX Graphics

    Texas Instruments is still dealing with Imagination Tech PowerVR SGX GPUs and has now posted an open-source DRI3 WSEGL plug-in for getting this binary blob to work with 3D acceleration under an X.Org Server using Direct Rendering Infrastructure 3.

    Tomi Valkeinen of Texas Instruments has posted this DRI3 WSEGL implementation for allowing Imagination's PowerVR SGX driver to work with 3D acceleration under X11 using DRI3. WSEGL is the buffer API used by the PowerVR SGX driver.

  • Vulkan 1.1.73 Released With Fixes

    Vulkan 1.1.73 is out as the latest minor refinement since last month's big Vulkan 1.1 update.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 M3 Released With BSD Improvements, Test Inspector & More

    Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 Milestone 3 is now available for evaluation as the latest step towards the official 8.0-Aremark release due out later this quarter.

GNOME Desktop/GTK: Fedora Atomic Workstation, Tobias Bernard, GNOME 3.28.1 and GTK3 in LibreOffice

Filed under
GNOME
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Developer tools

    A while ago, I wrote about using GNOME Builder for GTK+ work on my Fedora Atomic Workstation. I’ve done this with some success since then. I am using the nightly builds of GNOME Builder from the sdk.gnome.org flatpak repository, since I like to try the latest improvements.

  • Tobias Bernard: Joining Purism

    I’m very happy to announce that I’ve joined Purism. It’s awesome to be working for a company that not only cares about software freedom, but also has Ethical Design as a core principle. My role there is UI/UX designer on the Librem 5, a phone built from the ground up to run free software and GNU/Linux.

  • Purism Hires GNOME Developer For Librem 5 UI/UX Designer

    Purism's latest hire to work on the Librem 5 privacy-minded Linux smartphone effort is a UI/UX designer who has long been involved with GNOME.

    GNOME interaction designer Tobias Bernard is joining Purism as a UI/UX designer for the Librem 5 smartphone. This German free software advocate believes the Librem 5 has more potential than Ubuntu Touch or Firefox OS due to its freedom and privacy focus and using a full GNU/Linux stack rather than mixing with Android drivers.

  • Bassel Khartabil Free Fellowship, GNOME 3.28.1 Release, New Version of Mixxx and More

    GNOME 3.28 is ready for prime time after receiving its first point release on Friday, which includes numerous improvements and bug fixes. See the announcement for all the details on version 3.28.1.

  • Some Native GTK Dialogs in LibreOffice

    When the GTK3 backend is active in current LibreOffice master (towards 6.1) some of the dialogs are now comprised of fully native GTK dialogs and widgetery. Instead of VCL widgetery themed to look like GTK, they're the real thing.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Surviving Mars’ upcoming “Opportunity” update will be adding several goodies based on player feedback

    The next big patch for the strategy title is in the works. The developers have shared a little of what we can expect and it’s looking good.

    [...]

    It’s a generally fun game that runs pretty well on Linux and I’ve personally sunk in about 30 hours since launch

  • Some thoughts on Pawarumi, a stylish and action-packed shoot ‘em up

    This eye-catching shoot ‘em up mixes constant action with Mesoamerican motifs and a story about revenge. I stuck with it despite dying a large amount of times and have some thoughts to share about the game.

  • Sega Is Bringing 15 Classic Games, Including Sonic, to the Switch This Summer

    There was a time when we thought that the Switch would be a perfect fit for the Virtual Console. While we wait for Nintendo to bring classic games to the Switch, Sega is already on the case.

    At a Sega fan event in Japan, the company announced the new Sega Ages initiative. Under this banner, the game developer will release titles for the Nintendo Switch, including the original Sonic the Hedgehog, Phantasy Star, and Thunder Force 4, starting this summer. The company said over fifteen games would be released on the platform, but only had these three titles to share so far. No word yet on whether the vastly superior later Sonic games will also be included.

Mainline Linux Kernel Almost Ready For Finally Supporting Unprivileged FUSE Mounts

Filed under
Linux

While the Linux 4.17 merge window officially closed yesterday with the release of Linux 4.17-rc1, FUSE maintainer Miklos Szeredi is now trying to get his changes added.

With FUSE (File-Systems in User-Space) updates being uncommon these days, Miklos forgot about sending them into the Linux 4.17 merge window but today is trying to get them added.

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Clonezilla Live Disk Cloning OS Gets New Massive Deployment BitTorrent Mechanism

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The open source and freely distributed Clonezilla Live disk cloning and imaging live system recently received a new stable release that adds several new features, enhancements, and other changes.

Clonezilla Live 2.5.5-38 is now the latest stable release of the live system based on the open-source partition and disk imaging and cloning Clonezilla software. It's synced with the software repositories of the Debian Sid operating system series and uses a recent kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch.

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Top 5 Open Source Projects For Programmers and Developers

Filed under
OSS

Are you serious as a software developer? Want to reach heights and explore your knowledge of software development. Then, you are at the right place and reading the right article. As a developer or a fresher, you can self-learn lot of technologies by contributing to the open source projects which allow everyone to tweak and submit code.

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Samsung embraces open source on path to network virtualization, automation

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OSS

Samsung is raising its profile in the North American radio infrastructure business, and that includes support for operators’ efforts to use open standards.

Samsung is one of the vendors contributing to the xRAN Forum, which last week announced the release of a new specification that opens up competition in the Baseband Unit (BBU) and Remote Radio Units/Heads (RRUs/RRHs) that go into the eNodeB. Samsung Electronics America was also selected by Verizon earlier this year to assist in its 4G LTE Open RAN initiative, where it’s supplying gear that includes RRHs and BBUs.

According to Alok Shah, VP of networks strategy, business development and marketing at Samsung Electronics America, Samsung has long believed in the importance of open ecosystems.

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ReactOS Is Adding Support for Windows 10 and 8 Apps, NTFS Driver

Filed under
OS

Coming more than four months after version 0.4.7, ReactOS 0.4.8 is here with numerous improvements to the user experience and a bunch of new features that should please fans of the Microsoft Windows alternative. First, this release finally makes the "auto-hide," "always on top," and "toggle lock" options work as expected.

Support for balloon notifications in the system tray area has been added, along with automatic removal of icons of terminated process. The user experience optimizations continue with the ability to select multiple icons on the desktop, and it's now possible to view the capacity of local or attached drivers, as well as of folders and dirs.

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Also: Windows 10 apps on an open-source OS? ReactOS gains experimental support for latest Windows software

Linux Foundation LFCS: James Medeiros

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I spent my formative years glued to the CRT screen of my 486. In 1997 I was 12 years old and had discovered the local, text-only FreeNet -- my portal to the world's collective knowledge via 2400 baud modem. I quickly became familiar with the Lynx browser and eventually found the Schoolnet MOO (an object-oriented MUD which is still running today) where I made fast friends and began to explore basic coding in the environment. In high school, I was fortunate enough to have a fabulous teacher who gave us free time to experiment with installing our choice of operating systems on machines with swappable hard drives. My first Linux distribution was Mandriva (Mandrake at the time), but I've only recently made the switch to Linux as my primary OS.

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5 Raspberry Pi Operating Systems That Aren’t Linux

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OS

Looking for a way to get the most out of your Raspberry Pi? Running a project that just needs something more? Odd as it may seem, Linux might be the problem, so why not consider a non-Linux operating system? Several have been released, or adapted, for use on the Raspberry Pi.

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Linux and the beauty of browser-based games

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Judged across all platforms and architectures, Linux is the most popular operating system on the planet, surpassing even Microsoft Windows. But one aspect of computing that the open source operating has trailed the Windows operating system is desktop gaming, where Linux only occupies a small percentage of the (desktop) market. As a result many of the most popular Windows desktop games are not available on Linux. So Windows users contemplating switching to Linux must first answer this question: Is my favorite Windows desktop game available on Linux?

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Tiny, rugged IoT gateways offer 10-year Linux support

Filed under
Linux

Moxa announced a line of rugged, compact “UC 2100” IoT gateways that run 10-year available Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway middleware on a Cortex-A8 SoC.

Moxa announced the UC-2100 Series industrial IoT gateways along with its new UC 3100 and UC 5100 Series, but it offered details only on the UC-2100. All three series will offer ruggedization features, compact footprints, and on some models, 4G LTE support. They all run Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway data acquisition software on Arm-based SoCs.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?