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Qt Creator 4.7 Beta2 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.7 Beta2!

It is roughly 2 weeks after the Beta1 release, and 2 weeks before our planned release candidate, so we want to give you the opportunity to fetch an updated work-in-progress snapshot in between.
If you haven’t yet read about the improvements and new features that are coming with 4.7 (or if you have forgotten), I would like to point you to the blog post for the first beta.

Read more

OSS: C.H. Robinson, Instaclustr, Machine Learning and Koderize

Filed under
OSS
  • At C.H. Robinson, open source adoption brings iterative, fast development — almost too fast

    In 2014, C.H. Robinson, a third-party services and logistics firm, faced a roadblock: How do you remove bottlenecks in the technology development pipeline?

    Engineering teams with eight to 10 people aligned with a module or product worked to build out a functionality, such as an order management capability, according to Vanessa Adams, director, architecture and application development at C.H. Robinson. But individual teams were often held up by other product groups whose work they relied on. 

    At one point, 12-15 teams were required to meet most development deliverables and milestones, Adams told CIO Dive. In an effort to minimize the number of development dependencies, C.H. Robinson began exploring the idea of allowing people to work in other product areas rather than making them wait in line in the prioritization loop and hope project timelines synced up. 

    [...]

    With open source, legal departments have to approve contributions to open source projects, procurement departments have to understand there may not be a place to send an invoice and managers have to learn giving back to the open source framework on work time is part of the process. It's a long term shift that can take months, if not years, to execute, McCullough said.

  • Kafkaesque: Instaclustr creates Kafka-as-a-Service

    Instaclustr has announced Kafka-as-a-Service in bid to provide an easier route to the real-time data streaming platform

    An open source player from the start, the e-dropping Instaclustr specifies that this release follows an ‘early access programe’ that saw a handful of Instaclustr users deploy the Kafka-as-a-Service solution to manage high volume data streams in real-time.

  • Why are so many machine learning tools open source?

     

    Open source and machine learning go together like peanut butter and jelly. But why? In this article, Kayla Matthews explores why many of the best machine learning tools are open source.  

  • New adventures – old challenges

    I’ve also spent a lot of time on promoting free and open source software. I’ve spoken at conferences, gone to hackathlons, spoken at the university, and arranged meetups. All this culminated in foss-north which I’ve been organizing for the past three years.

    The conclusion from all of this is that there is an opportunity to focus on this full time. How can free and open source software be leveraged in various industries? How does one actually work with this? How does licensing work? and so on. To do so, I founded my own company – koderize – a while back and from now on I’m focusing fully on it.

Kernel (Linux) Systems Boot, Linux Foundation (AGL and ONAP), GNU/Linux Jobs, and ONF

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • A broad overview of how modern Linux systems boot

     

    For reasons beyond the scope of this entry, today I feel like writing down a broad and simplified overview of how modern Linux systems boot. Due to being a sysadmin who has stubbed his toe here repeatedly, I'm going to especially focus on points of failure.

  • Separation Architecture Supports Automotive Grade Linux

    Green Hills Software now offers INTEGRITY Multivisor secure virtualization and advanced development tools for Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) on 64-bit automotive grade SoCs. For the first time, AGL applications can be added to automotive systems meeting the highest ISO 26262 safety levels through the INTEGRITY real-time operating system (RTOS). As a result, OEMs can confidently run AGL-based infotainment and connected car applications in secure partitions alongside safety-critical and security-critical functions including instrument clusters, rear-view camera, ADAS, OTA, gateway and V2X. The results are lower system costs, more scalable platforms, shorter development times and lower ASIL certification costs.

  • Second ONAP Open Source Network Automation Release Ships

    The Linux Foundation announced the second software release from the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project, a unified platform for end-to-end, closed-loop network automation

    Announced last week, ONAP Beijing stems from the melding of two different open source networking automation projects under the direction of The Linux Foundation in March 2017. ONAP focuses on automating virtual network functions in software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) implementations.

  • Linux Projects Driving Demand for IT Pros With Open Source Skills
  • ONF Announces New Reference Designs

    Driving Formation of a New Supply Chain To support operators’ impending deployment of these Reference Designs, a number of tier-1 vendors have joined the efforts as ONF partners to contribute their skills, expertise and technologies to help realize the RDs. Adtran, Dell/EMC, Edgecore Networks and Juniper Networks are actively participating as supply chain partners in this reference design process. Each brings unique skills and complementary competencies, and by working together the partnership will be able to expedite the production readiness of the various solutions.

  • ADTRAN Partners with Open Networking Foundation (ONF) in Reimagined Strategic Plan

Games: BATTLETECH, Xenosis: Alien Infection, League of Legends

Filed under
Gaming
  • Harebrained Schemes making 'good progress' on the Linux version of BATTLETECH

    While the Linux version of BATTLETECH [Official Site] sadly didn't release with the latest patch, the developer did give it a clear mention.

  • Top-down sci-fi adventure 'Xenosis: Alien Infection' has been fully funded

    As a huge fan of Xenosis: Alien Infection, the top-down survival adventure game from NerdRage Studios, I'm really happy to see it get funded.

    With around 15 hours left on the Fig campaign, they're sitting pretty at 148% funded with around $37K. That's not bad at all and while it doesn't look like they will hit any interesting stretch-goals, the game itself is great anyway. Check out their latest sneak-peak:

  • Riot changes stance on anti-cheat tech, some Linux users will be able to play League again

    For League of Legends players on Linux, using GPU pass-through technology means they no longer have to say goodbye to Summoner's Rift.

    Last week Riot Games implemented new anti-cheat technology for the game. This targets all instances of virtualization, or software that acts as if it's hardware, in an attempt to stop users from ruining the game experience for others. Through virtualization, players can create accounts run by bots. This generally results in a ruined experience for anyone in a game with such an account due to the bots playing worse than a human teammate would. Unfortunately for some, the anti-cheat technology also inadvertently locks out users on Linux and other open-source software, like Wine.

Openwashing: Facebook, Microsoft/Adobe and More

Filed under
OSS

Hyperthreading From Intel Seen as Dodgy, Buggy

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
Security
  • Intel Hyper Threading Performance With A Core i7 On Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Following the news yesterday of OpenBSD disabling Intel Hyper Threading by default within its OS over security concerns and plans to disable Simultaneous Multi Threading for other processors/architectures too, here are some fresh Intel HT benchmarks albeit on Ubuntu Linux. The OpenBSD developer involved characterized HT/SMT as "doesn't necessarily have a positive effect on performance; it highly depends on the workload. In all likelihood it will actually slow down most workloads if you have a CPU with more than two cores." So here are some benchmarks using a current-generation Intel Core i7 8700K six-core processor with Hyper Threading.

  • SMT Disabled by Default in -current
  • OpenBSD Will Disable Intel Hyper-Threading To Avoid Spectre-Like Exploits

    OpenBSD, an open source operating system that focuses on security, announced that it will disable Intel’s Hyper-Threading (HT) feature so that attackers can no longer employ Spectre-like cache timing attacks.

  • Intel’s hyperthreading blocked on OpenBSD amid hints of new Spectre-like bugs

    The maintainer of open source Unix-like operating system, OpenBSD, has announced that it will disable hyperthreading on Intel CPUs because of security concerns. It claims that simultaneous multithreading creates a potential new attack vector for Spectre-like exploits, and plans to expand its disabling of multithreading technologies to other chip manufacturers in the near future.

Programming/Development: ISO C++, Rust, FBGraphics and So-called 'DevOps'

Filed under
Development
  • Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Rapperswil, June 2018

    A couple of weeks ago I attended a meeting of the ISO C++ Standards Committee (also known as WG21) in Rapperswil, Switzerland. This was the second committee meeting in 2018; you can find my reports on preceding meetings here (March 2018, Jacksonville) and here (November 2017, Albuquerque), and earlier ones linked from those. These reports, particularly the Jacksonville one, provide useful context for this post.

    At this meeting, the committee was focused full-steam on C++20, including advancing several significant features — such as Ranges, Modules, Coroutines, and Executors — for possible inclusion in C++20, with a secondary focus on in-flight Technical Specifications such as the Parallelism TS v2, and the Reflection TS.

  • Proposal for a staged RFC process

    I consider Rust’s RFC process one of our great accomplishments, but it’s no secret that it has a few flaws. At its best, the RFC offers an opportunity for collaborative design that is really exciting to be a part of. At its worst, it can devolve into bickering without any real motion towards consensus. If you’ve not done so already, I strongly recommend reading aturon’s excellent blog posts on this topic.

    The RFC process has also evolved somewhat organically over time. What began as “just open a pull request on GitHub” has moved into a process with a number of formal and informal stages (described below). I think it’s a good time for us to take a step back and see if we can refine those stages into something that works better for everyone.

    This blog post describes a proposal that arose over some discussions at the Mo

  • C gfx library for the Linux framebuffer with parallelism support

    FBGraphics was made to produce fullscreen pixels effects easily with non-accelerated framebuffer by leveraging multi-core processors, it is a bit like a software GPU (much less complex and featured!), the initial target platform is a Raspberry PI 3B and extend to the NanoPI (and many others embedded devices), the library should just work with many others devices with a Linux framebuffer altough there is at the moment some restrictions on the supported framebuffer format (24 bits).

  • 16 blogs and newsletters to follow for DevOps practitioners

Brave/Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Deterministic Firefox Builds

    As of Firefox 60, the build environment for official Firefox Linux builds switched from CentOS to Debian.

    As part of the transition, we overhauled how the build environment for Firefox is constructed. We now populate the environment from deterministic package snapshots and are much more stringent about dependencies and operations being deterministic and reproducible. The end result is that the build environment for Firefox is deterministic enough to enable Firefox itself to be built deterministically.

  • Brave Launches User Trials for Opt-In Ads That Reward Viewers

    We’ve been busy building our new Basic Attention Token (BAT) platform, which includes a new consent-based digital advertising model that benefits users, publishers, and advertisers. Our first phase started last Fall with the integration of BAT into Brave Payments, and enabled users to anonymously distribute contributions to their favorite publishers and creators.

  • Get Paid For Watching Ads: Brave Browser Announces Opt-in Trials

    Brave, the web browser which garnered a huge fan following, predominantly for its ad blocking feature, and depriving advertisers of confiscating private data by blocking trackers is in the news again. And this time, users can earn some cash.

    In a blog post, Brave announced that it will be conducting voluntary testing of their new ad model in which they will showcase at least 250 pre-packaged ads to users who will sign up for their early access version. Thus, offering a small amount of money in the form of micropayments.

First Beta Release of Krita 4.1

Filed under
KDE

Three months after the release of Krita 4.0, we’re releasing the first (and probably only) beta of Krita 4.1, a new feature release!

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Debian Developers: Mergify, Chrome, DebCamp18, OBS, GSoC and LibrePlanet

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Stop merging your pull requests manually

    We built Mergify as a free service for open-source projects. The engine powering the service is also open-source.

  • Odd dependency on Google Chrome

    Hmm, so I noticed every time I started a fresh new Chrome, I logged into my Google account. So, once again clearing things I started Chrome, didn’t login and closed and reopened. I had Chrome running the second time! Alas, not with all the stuff synchronised.

    An issue for Mailspring put me onto the right path. installing gnome-keyring (or the dependencies p11-kit and gnome-keyring-pkcs11) fixed Chrome.

    So if Chrome starts but you get no window, especially if you use cinnamon, try that trick.

  • Plans for DebCamp18

    I’m going to DebCamp18!

  • Triggering Debian Builds on OBS

    OBS supports building Debian packages. To do so, one must properly configure a project so OBS knows it is building a .deb package and to have the packages needed to handle and build debian packages installed.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with Debian - Week 5

    During week 5, there were 3 merge requests undergoing review process simultaneously. I learned a lot about how code should be written in order to assist the reader since the code is read more times than the time it is written.

  • How markets coopted free software’s most powerful weapon (LibrePlanet 2018 Keynote)

    Several months ago, I gave the closing keynote address at LibrePlanet 2018. The talk was about the thing that scares me most about the future of free culture, free software, and peer production.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Millions of Streaming Devices Are Vulnerable to a Retro Web Attack

    Sitting in his Chicago apartment, two blocks from Lake Michigan, Dorsey did what anyone with a newfound hacking skill would: He tried to attack devices he owned. Instead of being blocked at every turn, though, Dorsey quickly discovered that the media streaming and smart home gadgets he used every day were vulnerable to varying degrees to DNS rebinding attacks. He could gather all sorts of data from them that he never would have expected.

  • Pros vs Joes CTF: The Evolution of Blue Teams

    Pros v Joes CTF is a CTF that holds a special place in my heart. Over the years, I’ve moved from playing in the 1st CTF as a day-of pickup player (signing up at the conference) to a Blue Team Pro, to core CTF staff. It’s been an exciting journey, and Red Teaming there is about the only role I haven’t held. (Which is somewhat ironic given that my day job is a red team lead.) As Blue teams have just formed, and I’m not currently attached to any single team, I wanted to share my thoughts on the evolution of Blue teaming in this unique CTF. In many ways, this will resemble the Blue Team player’s guide I wrote about 3 years ago, but will be based on the evolution of the game and of the industry itself. That post remains relevant, and I encourage you to read it as well.

    [...]

    It turns out that a lot of the fundamental knowledge necessary in securing a network are just basically system administration fundamentals. Understanding how the system works and how systems interact with each other provides much of the basics of information security.

    On both Windows and Linux, it is useful to understand:

    How to install & update software and operating system updates
    How to change permissions of files
    How to start and stop services
    How to set up a host-based firewall
    Basic Shell Commands
    User administration

KDE/Qt: Qt 6 in Sight and Elisa 0.2 Beta

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018

    About two weeks ago i attended Qt Contributor Summit 2018, i did so wearing my KDAB hat, but given that KDE software is based heavily on Qt I think I'll give a quick summary of the most important topic that was handled at the Summit: Qt 6

  • The Qt 6 Plans For November 2020, Qt 5.15 Likely Being Last Of Qt5

    At the recent Qt Contributors' Summit as previously covered on Phoronix were some early discussions over plans to release Qt 6.0 in 2020. A few more tidbits of information have come to light on these interesting tool-kit plans.

    Albert Astals Cid of KDAB was at this recent Qt conference and he has now shared his summit notes, particularly around Qt 6. He confirms that Qt 6.0 is planning for a November 2020 release, Qt 6 should be an easy migration path from Qt 5, etc.

  • 0.2 Beta 1 Release of Elisa Music Player

    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

    We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).

  • Elisa 0.2 Beta Released For This Newest KDE Music Player

    KDE's Elisa music player is just over one year old and with a few months having passed since the Elisa 0.1 inaugural release, succeeding that today is the beta for the upcoming Elisa 0.2.

Funding for Open 'Core' Companies

Filed under
OSS

'Proper' GNU/Linux on Google OSes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Google’s Fuchsia OS will support Linux apps

    Google’s non-Linux-based Fuchsia OS has added an emulator for running Debian Linux apps. Like its upcoming Linux emulator for Chrome OS, Fuchsia’s “Guest” app will offer tighter integration than typical emulators.

    Google has added a Guest app to its emergent and currently open source Fuchsia OS to enable Linux apps to run within Fuchsia as a virtual machine (VM). The Guest app makes use of a library called Machina that permits closer integration with the OS than is available with typical emulators, according to a recent 9to5Google story.

  • Here are the latest Chrome OS devices that will support Linux apps

    The ability to run Linux apps in virtual machines in Chrome is expanding beyond Google's flagship Pixelbook line of Chromebooks. The feature, for which plans were first discovered in late February, was formally announced by Google at I/O 2018. Unlike the existing solution, Crouton, support for Linux apps does not require enabling developer mode on Chrome OS, allowing users to install Linux apps without needing to sacrifice security protections.

    In addition to the Pixelbook, support for the new Crostini virtual machine feature has also come to the original Samsung Chromebook Plus, the detachable HP Chromebook X2, and the ASUS Chromebook Flip C101. Likewise, according to a report from xda-developers, the feature is coming to the Acer Chromebook Spin 13 and Chromebook 13, as well as 2018-era Chromeboxes, which all share the same board ID "fizz." Of these, the Acer Chromebox CX13 series and ASUS Chromebox 3 series both have multiple SKUs, maxing out with an Intel Core i7-8550U paired with 16GB RAM and 64GB storage for $750.

  • Linux App Support Is Coming To Acer Chromebook Flip C101

    Acer’s Chromebook Flip C101 is now officially the latest Chrome OS device expected to be in-line for virtualized Linux app support, following a new commit pushed to the Chromium Gerrit on June 15. That places the Flip C101 in a very select club alongside Google’s Pixelbook, the HP Chromebook x2, and the first generation Samsung Chromebook Plus. Of course, there’s no official date with regard to when Linux App support will arrive for the Chromebook Flip C101. If previous trends are followed, then it shouldn’t take too long at all for its official arrival in the Canary Channel of the OS. That comes following a commit indicating that support for the new feature has been moved from the Samsung Chromebook Plus to the devices’ shared parent board. Since only the Chromebook Plus and Chromebook Flip C101 share that board, dubbed “Gru,” that suggests that both devices will support Linux apps in a virtual environment.

Linux Foundation: New Study, Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), and Hyperledger Fabric

Filed under
Linux

Graphics: AMDGPU, Nvidia, Apple's Harm to Science

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDGPU DRM Driver To Finally Expose GPU Load Via Sysfs

    The AMDGPU DRM driver appears to finally be crossing the milestone of exposing the current GPU load (as a percentage) in a manner that can be easily queried via sysfs.

    For years I've been frustrated via the lack of standardization of sysfs/debugfs files among the DRM drivers and some seemingly basic information not being exposed in such a manner that easily benefits various desktop plug-ins, those wanting to script basic monitors/checks/etc around such outputs, and use-cases like with the Phoronix Test Suite for easily querying this information too for its sensor recording. One of the frustrations with the Radeon Linux stack has been that there wasn't a trivial way to read the GPU load usage as a percentage... There's been ways if installing third-party utilities like RadeonTool, but no universal solution nor one that doesn't require root and would be widely available.

  • Radeon Software 18.20 Stable Released With Official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Support

    The Radeon Software "AMDGPU-PRO" 18.20 hybrid driver stack is now available with official support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 17.20.

    Two months after the debut of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" release, the Q2'2018 Radeon Sotware for Linux driver update has arrived with support for this latest long-term support release. Radeon Software 18.20 was officially released last week but seemingly went under everyone's radar until now.

  • Nvidia Releases a Batch of Open Source Tools for AI

    Graphics processors increasingly used as hardware accelerators for deep learning applications are also being deployed with the Kubernetes cluster orchestrator as another way to accelerate the scaling of training and inference for deep learning models.

    The two-front approach includes Nvidia’s (NASDAQ: NVDA) release to developers this week of a Kubernetes on GPU capability aimed at enterprises training models on multi-cloud GPU clusters. Previously, Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) launched a beta version of GPUs on its Kubernetes Engine aimed at accelerating machine learning and image processing workloads.

  • AI caramba! Nvidia devs get a host of new kit to build smart systems

    Nvidia has released a bunch of new tools for savvy AI developers in time for the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Salt Lake City on Tuesday.

  • Chemists criticise mooted shutdown of 3D visualisation tools

    End of support for Apple’s OpenGL programming interface could pull the plug on molecular modelling software

    Researchers are voicing concerns over a move that may affect many 3D visualisation programs that are commonly used in computational research.

    Apple’s Macintosh operating systems (macOS) is set to end support for OpenGL, the programming interface frequently used to display 3D graphics in medical and scientific visualisation software, which has existed since 1992. Nearly all open source and commercial chemistry visualisation programs that are used to display atoms, molecules, bonds and protein ribbons – such as Mercury, VMD and PyMOL – use the system.

Stable kernels 4.16.17 and 4.14.51

Filed under
Linux

OpenBSD disables hyperthreading support for Intel CPUs due to likely data leaks

Filed under
Security
BSD
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.