Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The origin and evolution of FreeDOS Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 7:44am
Story U.S. makes renewable energy software open source Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 7:32am
Story Solus Gets Driverless Printing, Improvements to Linux Steam Integration, More Rianne Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 11:36pm
Story Canonical Adds Last-Minute Finishing Touches to Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Rianne Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 11:34pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 10:44pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 8:59pm
Story Tizen and Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 8:57pm
Story Devices: Aaeon, Corvalent, and Renesas Electronics Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 8:55pm
Story Red Hat and Servers: India, China, Docker and Kubernetes Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 8:54pm
Story GNOME: LVFS and Epiphany Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2017 - 8:52pm

Pi-Top: This Raspberry Pi And Linux-powered Laptop Is For New

Filed under
Linux

In late 2014, Pi-Top, U.K.’s education startup raised about $200,000 on Indiegogo to fund its first DIY laptop. It was followed by pi-topCEED, a cheap desktop computer that’s powered by Raspberry Pi.

Their latest offering, the new Pi-Top, is a new tinkering machine that you can assemble on your own using modular approach. Compared to the past offerings, the number of steps needed to assemble the computer and start working are much less.

Read more

Catching up with RawTherapee 5.x

Filed under
Software

Free-software raw photo editor RawTherapee released a major new revision earlier this year, followed by a string of incremental updates. The 5.x series, released at a rapid pace, marks a significant improvement in the RawTherapee's development tempo — the project's preceding update had landed in 2014. Regardless of the speed of the releases themselves, however, the improved RawTherapee offers users a lot of added functionality and may shake up the raw-photo-processing workflow for many photographers.

It has been quite some time since we last examined the program during the run-up to the 3.0 series in 2010. In the intervening years, the scope of the project has grown considerably: macOS is now supported in addition to Windows and various flavors of Linux, and the application has seen substantial additions to the tool set it provides.

The competitive landscape that RawTherapee inhabits has also changed; 2010-era competitors Rawstudio and UFRaw are not seeing much active development these days (not to mention the death of proprietary competitors like Apple's Aperture), while darktable has amassed a significant following — particularly among photographers interested in a rich set of effects and retouching tools. At the other end of the spectrum, raw-file support improved in the "consumer" desktop photo-management tools (such as Shotwell) in the same time period, thus offering casual users some options with a less intimidating learning curve than darktable's. Where RawTherapee sits amid all of the current offerings can be a bit hard to define.

The 5.0 release landed on January 22, 5.1 then arrived on May 15, and 5.2 was unleashed (in the words of the announcement) on July 23. The project also migrated its source-code repository and issue tracking to GitHub, launched a new discussion forum, and has assembled a wiki-style documentation site called RawPedia.

Read more

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) final RC images now available

Filed under
KDE

Artful Aardvark (17.10) final Release Candidate (RC) images are now available for testing. Help us make 17.10 the best release yet!

The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 on October 19, 2017.

Read more

Microsoft Breaks Privacy Law, Adds Back Doors, Then Blames North Korea

Filed under
Microsoft

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" Xfce

Filed under
Reviews

The mission for a swap Linux conveyance for Linux Mint 13 LTS "Maya" Xfce proceeds. With this post comes a review of the most recent MATE version of Linux Mint. Particularly for consistent perusers of this blog, I will simply say that with the most recent point discharge, it appears like the designers have put cleaner into the conveyance, including their new arrangement of "X-applications" intended to work crosswise over MATE, Cinnamon, Xfce, and GNOME, keeping away from the entanglements of more DE-particular applications. I need to perceive what has changed since my last review and to see whether this would be reasonable for the establishment and everyday use on my portable workstation. With that in mind, I made a live USB framework (once more, on my new SanDisk Cruzer USB streak drive) utilizing the "dd" order. Take after the bounce to perceive what it resembles. Note that I'll often refer to past review, noticing just changes and general imperative focuses as required.

Read more

KDE: KWave and Plasma in Slackware

Filed under
KDE
Slack
  • Replacing Audacity with KWave

    KWave has been developed since 1998, yet few have heard of it. I only recently heard of it myself from writer and podcaster Marcel Gagné while I was setting up to do how-to-videos. Part of the reason for its obscurity might be that, despite its name, it only recently become an official KDE project in the last release. However, the major reason for its obscurity is probably that it has been overshadowed by the better-known Audacity — which is a pity, because in most ways, KWave is every bit as useful as an audio editor.

    Why would anyone want an Audacity substitute? For one thing, while Audacity is cross-platform, it is not well-integrated into Linux. Audacity handles its own resources, as you can tell by its lengthy load time. Often, Audacity frequently gives confusing options for input and playback sources, giving several names to the same device and offering irrelevant front and back options for mono devices, so that users can only find the one they need through trial and error. Sometimes, the necessary option for a particular source can change for no apparent each time Audacity starts.

  • October updates for the Slackware Plasma5 desktop

    There’s been updates to all the major components of the KDE Software Collection (I know they stopped using that name but I think it is still fitting). So I tasked my build box to compile hundreds of new packages and today I have for you the October ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current. KDE 5_17.10 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.39.0, Plasma 5.11.0 and Applications 17.08.2. All based on Qt 5.9.2 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.

Games: OpenRA, Hell Warders, Ubuntu, Fedora and Wine

Filed under
Gaming

Korora 26 Bloat - More is less or less is more?

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Korora 26 Bloat is a noble concept, but it does not solve the fundamental problem it aims to solve: make Fedora usable. It tries to minimize the wreck that is Fedora 26 and fails to do so. Additionally, it introduces problems that the original did not have, making an even bigger mess.
Korora comes with a slew of ergonomics issues, flaking hardware support, too much actual bloat, tons of niggles and issues that are technically Fedora's legacy, and then the horrible Nvidia support that is just embarrassing in 2017. To answer my own question, more is less in this case, and there isn't a justifiable reason why you should prefer Korora over Fedora, nor why you should use it against the likes of Ubuntu, Kubuntu or Mint. Alas, this is not a good release, 2/10. Unusable, which is a shame, because I did like what Korora managed to do in the past. But it just shows how fragile the Linux world is. Proper distro release QA is a joke, regressions are nothing but a silent excuse to move on and churn out more bad code, almost like industrial protein, and this is so depressing I sometimes wonder why I even bother.

Anyway, to sum it up, Fedora 26 is worse than its predecessors, and Korora 26 is both worse than its own forefathers and the original article it seeks to tame, with appalling support for proprietary graphics drivers and other distros in a multi-boot setup that I really cannot recommend it. The cosmetic issues are also important, but in the end, the real deal breaker is the hardware side. Waiting for Korora 27. Peace.

Read more

KDE Celebrates 21st Anniversary with New Updates of KDE Applications, Frameworks

Filed under
KDE

Today, the KDE Project celebrates the 21st anniversary of the well-known and widely used desktop environment for GNU/Linux and UNIX-like operating systems with new releases of its KDE Frameworks and KDE Applications software stacks.

Read more

Linux 4.13.7

Filed under
Android

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.7 kernel.

All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Raspberry Pi 3 based laptop features DIY hacking bay

Filed under
Linux

Pi-top has revised its RPi based laptop with a 14-inch HD screen and a slide-off keyboard that reveals a cooling unit and DIY space for a breadboard kit.

Pi-top’s Raspberry Pi driven laptop has received a major upgrade with a new model with a slightly larger 14-inch, HD screen and a 6 to 8 hour battery. The 2017 edition of the education-focused Pi-top features a modular design with a larger keyboard that slides forward to reveal a Raspberry Pi 3 with a new heatsink. It also includes an empty bay for DIY hacking, which can be filled with components from a free Inventor’s Kit. This DIY kit includes a breadboard, a motion sensor, LEDs, and a microphone, all mounted on a magnetic sliding rail.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM

Filed under
Development
GNOME
BSD
  • Modern Text Editor Design

    .

    Gtk4 development is heating up, and we are starting to see a toolkit built like a game engine. That’s pretty cool. But how will that change how we write editors? Should it?

    In the Gtk3 cycle, I added support to GtkTextView that would render using Alex’s GtkPixelCache. It helped us amortize the cost of rendering into mostly just an XCopyArea() when drawing a frame. It’s why we have that nice 60fps two-finger-scrolling.

  • Policy hacking

    The hackfest was part of an effort to redefine how the GNOME Foundation operates and is perceived.

    [...]

    Until now, the board has largely operated in an executive mode: each meeting we decide on funding requests, trademark questions and whatever other miscellaneous issues come our way. While some of this decision-making responsibility is to be expected, it is also fair to say that the board spends too much time on small questions and not enough on bigger ones.

  • Coda revival

    Coda is a distributed file system developed as a research project at Carnegie Mellon University, descended from a older version of the Andrew File System. It got dropped from FreeBSD some five years ago, due to not having been adopted for a MPSAFE world. The focus for this current project is to bring it back into sufficiently workable shape that it could return to the kernel. It is currently in a working condition. Work is underway to test it better, fix whatever issues are found, and commit it to 12-CURRENT.

  • Google's Learning Software Learns to Write Learning Software

    In a project called AutoML, Google’s researchers have taught machine-learning software to build machine-learning software. In some instances, what it comes up with is more powerful and efficient than the best systems the researchers themselves can design. Google says the system recently scored a record 82 percent at categorizing images by their content. On the harder task of marking the location of multiple objects in an image, an important task for augmented reality and autonomous robots, the auto-generated system scored 43 percent. The best human-built system scored 39 percent.

  • Intel Begins Working On "Knights Mill" Support For LLVM/Clang

    Intel compiler engineers have begun mainlining "Knights Mill" enablement within the LLVM compiler stack.

    Knights Mill is the codename for an upcoming Xeon Phi expected for release later this quarter. Details on Knights Mill are relatively light but it will cater to deep learning / AI use-cases and more efficient than Knights Landing (KNL).

    Intel has previously said Knights Mill is capable of twice the performance of Knights Landing for floating point operations per cycle and there are also new/optimized instructions for 8-bit and 16-bit arithmetic.

KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

Filed under
KDE

Today marks twenty-one years since the KDE project was founded.

It was on 14 October 1996 that the "Kool Desktop Environment" was founded by Matthias Ettrich. At the time he wanted KDE to be a "consistent, nice looking free desktop-environment."

Read more

Graphics and Games: AMDGPU DC, Vulkan, GOG

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • More Pre-4.15 AMDGPU DC Patches To Test Out This Weekend

    For Radeon RX Vega Linux users or those with newer Radeon GPUs and just wanting to make use of HDMI/DP audio, there are some new "AMDGPU DC" patches ready for testing this weekend.

    While AMDGPU DC is being staged as a pull request finally for Linux 4.15, the work hasn't yet settled down as AMD developers continue taming this massive code-base of more than 120,000 lines of code. Just recently in fact were another 100+ patches for this display code that allows Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting, and other display feature updates long sought after by Radeon users.

  • Vulkan 1.0.63 Introduces Global Priority Support

    Vulkan 1.0.63 is now available as the latest minor update to this high performance graphics/compute API.

    As usual, Vulkan 1.0.63 is mostly made up of document corrections and clarifications. There is though one new extension.

  • Humble Bundle has been acquired by IGN

    This is rather unsettling to see, Humble Bundle has now officially joined with the massive media site IGN.

Haiku OS Is Still Chugging Along To Get Its First Official Release Out

Filed under
OS

The BeOS-inspired Haiku OS has been around since 2002 and its alpha release came out five years ago while the beta and first "R1" stable release are still being pursued.

This week the open-source operating system project published a new report entitled Where is Haiku R1?

Read more

Microsoft Breaking the Law and Computer Security Woes

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Mozilla 'Freemium' and Visual Impairment Simulator

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla might offer Freemium services in the future

    The whole idea seems to be in an early stage and it is quite possible that it won't come to fruition after careful examination. When asked what kind of services Mozilla was considering, Beard answered that the organization was exploring that. This is all the information that is available at this point in time.

  • Mozilla CEO says new Firefox browser delivers 'a big bang'

    There's another side as we start to look at products that we could potentially offer. Some of them start to look like services, exploring the freemium models. There'd be a free level always, but also some premium services offering.

  • NoCoffee: Visual Impairment Simulator

    Four years ago, on a snowy February day, Aaron Leventhal huddled in his unheated home and created a Chrome extension called NoCoffee. This extension allows users to experience web content through different lenses of visual impairments*.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Laptops: Chrome OS and System76

  • Chrome OS Gets Material Design for "Do Not Disturb," Android-Like Screenshots
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort is sharing today information on a new Material Design refresh for Google's Chrome OS' "Do Not Disturb" mode, which landed in the latest Chrome Canary channel. According to the developer, the Material Design refresh for the "Do Not Disturb" mode will make the Notification Center look nicer, but also consistent with the Android user experience. Those using the Chrome Canary experimental channel can give it a try right now.
  • System76 'Lemur' and 'Galago Pro' Ubuntu Linux laptops get 8th gen Intel Core CPUs
    The famed Linux-laptop seller also says, "The Lemur you know and love is now even better with the Intel 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPU with 4 cores and 8 threads, allowing you to multitask up to 40-percent faster. The slim, 3.6 lb laptop with impressive 14.1-inch 1080p IPS display is still your perfect travel companion; easy to carry from meeting to meeting or across campus." New processors aside, these laptops should be pretty much identical to prior generations -- which is a very good thing. If you want to configure a Lemur with a Coffee Lake chip, you can build your own here. A Galago Pro with an 8th Gen Intel Core processor can be configured here.

Events: Open Source Summit Europe, LibrePlanet 2018

Licences: Eclipse Public Licence 2.0, GPL Copyright Troll, Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0

  • Eclipse Public License version 2.0 added to license list
    We recently updated our list of various licenses and comments about them to include the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 (EPL). In terms of GPL compatibility, the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 is essentially equivalent to version 1.0. The only change is that it explicitly offers the option of designating the GNU GPL version 2 or later as a "secondary license" for a certain piece of code.
  • Linux kernel community tries to castrate GPL copyright troll
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman and several other senior Linux figures have published a “Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement” to be included in future Linux documentation, in order to ensure contributions to the kernel don't fall foul of copyright claims that have already seen a single developer win "at least a few million Euros.” In a post released on Monday, October 16th, Kroah-Hartman explained the Statement's needed because not everyone who contributes to the kernel understands the obligations the GNU Public Licence 2.0 (GPL 2.0), and the licence has “ambiguities … that no one in our community has ever considered part of compliance.”
  • Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0
    After many years of working on it, it is with immense pleasure to see the FLA-2.0 – the full rewrite of the Fiduciary License Agreement – officially launch.

Security: Let’s Encrypt, Updates, Google, DHS, Adobe