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Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 4.16-rc2 Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 8:38am
Story OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:39am
Story Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11 Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:37am
Story Fedora and Red Hat's Finances Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:35am
Story GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:33am
Story KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:32am
Story fail0verflow turns a Nintendo Switch into a full-fledged Linux PC Rianne Schestowitz 1 19/02/2018 - 3:31am
Story Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:29am
Story Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 3:28am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2018 - 2:51am

KDE: Qt, Cutelyst, Spectacle, Kirigami

Filed under
KDE
  • SFXR Qt noise buffer

    I was working on adding sounds to Pixel Wheels rescue helicopter, so I started SFXR Qt and after a few experiments I came up with a decent sound. Unfortunately it did not sound that good in the game. It was much more dull than in the app. Listening again to the sound in SFXR Qt I realized there were subtle variations between each plays, which made the sound more interesting.

  • Qt in Visual Studio: Improving Performance

    In the last post, we discussed a new approach to design time and build time integration of external tools in Visual Studio using MSBuild rules and targets. This will be included in the upcoming release of version 2.2 of the Qt VS Tools. In this post, we will discuss the performance improvements that are also included in this new version.

  • Cutelyst on TechEmpower benchmarks round 15

    Since this round took a long time and was scheduled to be release many times last year I decided not to update Cutelyst to avoid not having the chance to fix any issues and have broken results. Cutelyst 1.9.0 and Qt 5.9 were used, both had some performance improvements compared to round 14, and thus you can see better results on this round compared to 14, most notably the JSON tests went from 480K request/second to 611K req/s, also due this old Cutelyst release jemalloc was again not used due a bug we had in CMake files that didn’t link against it.

  • Usability & Productivity highlight: Spectacle

    Over the past few weeks, we’ve done a lot of Usability & Productivity work for Spectacle, KDE’s screenshot tool. I’d like to share the progress! But first, a screenshot. Here’s how spectacle looks now:

  • This week in Discover (and Kirigami!), part 6

    This is going to be a double-header: today we’re discussing Discover as well as Kirigami–KDE’s UI framework that facilitates writing convergent apps that look and feel good on both the desktop and a mobile device.

    …At least that’s the idea. The truth is, KDE users have voiced a lot of criticism for how well this works out in practice. An especially common complaint is that the desktop user experience gets short shrift, and Kirigami apps feel like big phone apps.

Openwashing: Blockchains, .NET Promotion and 'OpenAPI'

Filed under
OSS

LibreOffice 6

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice 6.0.1 Available To Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    LibreOffice is the power-packed free, libre and open source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and GNU/Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production and data processing needs: Writer: the word processor, Calc: the spreadsheet application, Impress: the presentation engine, Draw: our drawing and flowcharting application, Base: our database and database frontend, and Math: for editing mathematics.

  • LibreOffice 6.0 scored close to 1 million downloads in just 14 days

    The LibreOffice 6.0 release at the end of January was met by enthusiasm from tech bloggers and open-source enthusiasts alike.

    And that enthusiasm translated into some very healthy download numbers.

  • HiFive, LibreOffice, Meltdown and Spectre and more

    We would like to congratulate the hard working folks behind the LibreOffice 6.0 application suite. Officially released on January 31, the site has counted almost 1 million downloads. An amazing accomplishment.

Plasma – The road to perfection is paved with bugs

Filed under
KDE

There you go. Now, before you say “But Windows or Gnome also …” Wait. Stop. The purpose of this list is not to seek solace in failures or incomplete/imperfect implementations of desktop environment solutions that may exist out there. The purpose is to express my view, as an individual user, of the big and little things that do not seem to work well in Plasma. After all, the desktop is there to allow people to enjoy themselves, to have fun, to be productive, and whatnot. And every little papercut or inconsistency is detrimental to the experience.

It would be a nice exercise to actually do the same thing with … other desktop environments. I believe that Plasma probably has the fewest issues, as odd as it may sound after you’ve just consumed this long j’accuse list. But it is still not perfect, it’s still not good enough to everyday use, and there are many things that need to be improved. Then again, no one said creating a splendid desktop environment was going to be easy or boring, right. Take care, and perhaps in your comments, you will come up with a few more niggles that I missed. Let’s hear your thoughts. Spill them out.

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Also: Plasma 5 perfection: call for development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Go 1.10 and New PHP Builds for Fedora/Red Hat

Filed under
Development
  • Go 1.10 is released

    Happy Friday, happy weekend! Today the Go team is happy to announce the release of Go 1.10. You can get it from the download page.

    See the Go 1.10 release notes for all the details.

  • Golang 1.10 Offers Many Smaller Changes, Restores NetBSD Support

    Not only is there a new Rust release this week but the Google developers have put out the Go 1.10 update.

    Go 1.10 ships with many minor feature additions and improvements with no big overhauls. Among the changes with Go 1.10 are automatic caching of build and test results, many other go tooling improvements, minor enhancements to the Gofmt formatting utility, and compiler toolchain updates.

  • PHP version 7.1.15RC1 and 7.2.3RC1

Wine 3.2 is Out

Filed under
Software

diff -u: Automated Bug Reporting

Filed under
Linux

A variety of automated bug-hunters are roaming around reporting bugs. One of them is Syzbot, an open-source tool specifically designed to find bugs in Linux and report them. Dmitry Vyukov recently sent in a hand-crafted email asking for help from the community to make Syzbot even more effective.

The main problems were how to track bugs after Syzbot had reported them and how to tell when a patch went into the kernel to address a given bug.

It turned out that Andrey Ryabinin and Linus Torvalds got together to collaborate on an easy solution for Dmitry's problem: Syzbot should include a unique identifier in its own email address. The idea is that anything after a "+" in an email address is completely ignored. So zbrown@gmail.com is exactly the same as zbrown+stoptrump@gmail.com. Andrey and Linus suggested that Syzbot use this technique to include a hash value associated with each bug report. Then, Linux developers would include that email address in the "Reported-By" portion of their patch submissions as part of the normal developer process.

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Defense Department (Re)Launches Open Source Software Portal

Filed under
OSS

The Defense Department launched the Code.mil website on Tuesday, a new, streamlined portal for its similarly named Code.mil initiative, a collaborative approach to meeting the government’s open source policy.

The new website was designed to give a more straightforward user experience. The site features a suite of new tools, including checklists that links to offer guidance, and represents “an evolution of the Code.mil project,” according to Ari Chivukula, policy wrangler for the Defense Digital Service.

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Linux Weather Forecast

Filed under
Linux

This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

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5 Open Source Technology Trends for 2018

Filed under
OSS

Technology is evolving faster than the speed of light. Well, not quite, but you get the picture. Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence, OpenStack, progressive web apps – they are all set to make an impact this year. You might be accustomed to navigating your forex trading platform or building a website in WordPress, but how familiar are you with the following?

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Better Know a Blogger: SJVN on Linux, Microsoft, space roadsters, and more

Filed under
Interviews

I have known Steven for more than a decade. Not only is he a top technology journalist and a consummate professional, he is a role model of mine.

Steven, well known by his initials SJVN, stands out -- not just because he's a good journalist. He stands out because he's a great explainer. When I want to understand a networking, operating systems, or Linux-related topic, I often turn to Steven or his articles.

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Real-time Linux based automation controller supports up to 16 I/O modules

Filed under
Linux

Opto 22 announced its first Linux-based automation controller: a rugged “Groov EPIC” system that runs real-time Linux on a quad-core ARM SoC, and supports process and machine control, SCADA/RTU, and industrial IoT edge gateway applications.

Increasingly, industrial equipment manufacturers must not only compete on features, but also meet their clients’ need to attract the best developers. That often means shifting from proprietary RTOS or Windows based solutions to Linux. The latest to make the switch is Opto 22, whose announcement suggests the Groov EPIC controller represents a major new product direction compared to its previous Groov products.

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Devices/Embedded: Nintendo Switch, Advantech, Renesa, PocketBeagle

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Patent Troll MPEG LA Wants People to Stay With MPEG

Filed under
Movies
  • Waddawewant? Free video codecs! When do we... oh, look, the last MPEG-2 patent expired!

    It's almost of historical interest only, but everywhere except the Philippines and Malaysia, the last MPEG-2 video encoder/decoder patents have expired.

    As *nixcraft noted, what it means is that there will never again be the risk of an MPEG-2 decoder being bombed in the libre operating system world.

    The company that had the patents wrapped up for licensing, MPEG LA, told the world the last US patent expired on 13 February here .

  • Race on to bring AV1 open source codec to market, as code freezes

    The long-heralded open source AV1 codec is now set for development of commercial product, with the code complete and ready to be frozen over the next few weeks. This has been confirmed by contributors to the standard such as Austrian transcoding software developer Bitmovin, which hopes to be among the first to bring out a product. That will happen once members of the Alliance for Open Media (AOM) that developed the codec sign off its performance.

Graphics: glTF 2, Graphics Compiler, DRI3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Khronos Adds Draco Geometry Compression To glTF 2.0

    Khronos' glTF transmission format for 3D scenes and models continues getting better. This 3D format has seen adoption by countless applications and engines and even usage within Microsoft products. Khronos' latest advancement to glTF 2.0 is a compression extension.

  • Intel Open-Sources LLVM Graphics Compiler, Compute Runtime With OpenCL 2.1+

    Now it's clear why Intel hasn't been working on the Beignet code-base in months as they have been quietly working on a new and better OpenCL stack and run-time! On open-source Intel OpenCL you can now have OpenCL 2.1 while OpenCL 2.2 support is on the way.

    Intel by way of their Open-Source Technology Center quietly open-sourced a new compute runtime as well as an LLVM-based graphics compiler. Thanks to a sharp-eyed Phoronix reader for spotting and pointing out to us this new Intel OpenCL stack that hasn't really received any attention at all yet.

  • DRI3 v1.1 Updated by Collabora For Modifiers & Multi-Plane Support

    As a sign that DRI3 v1.1 is hopefully ready to go, Louis-Francis Ratté-Boulianne of Collabora on Friday sent out his latest set of patches adding modifiers and multi-plane support to the Direct Rendering Infrastructure.

    DRI3 v1.1 has been a long, ongoing project for this first major addition to the DRI3 infrastructure. Namely there is support for explicit format modifiers and pixmaps backed by multi-planar buffers. Collabora has also already been working on some experimental DRI3 v1.2 patches for DMA fences, which originally was part of the v1.1 patches, but then pushed back to their own series.

KDE: Plasma and Solus 4 Updates, Amarok Comes to Plasma 5

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma and Solus 4 Updates | The Roundup #4

    Welcome to The Roundup #4, your bytes of Solus news. In this roundup, we’re talking updates to Kernels, Plasma, various items for Solus 4, and more!

  • Solus 4 To Offer Experimental GNOME Wayland Session, MATE UI Refresh

    The Solus Linux distribution has offered up some new details this week on their upcoming Solus 4 release.

    First up, their integration of Snap package management (snapd) has been deferred so it's no longer a release blocker. They will land the Snap support though still in the future when it's ready.

  • KDE Amarok Music Player Receives Revived Port To Qt5 / KF5

    While Amarok was once KDE's dominant music player, it hasn't seen a new release now in about five years and has yet to see a release based on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5. But there's hope that might still happen.

    In the absence of a modern Amarok release there have been plenty of other KDE media players coming about like Elisa and Babe, but coming out today is an updated patch for bringing Amarok to a Qt5/KF5 world.

How to make sense of the Apache 2 patent license

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS
Legal

In essence, when a software developer contributes code to a project (i.e., the Work under the license), he or she becomes a Contributor. Under the above term, Contributors are granting permission to use any of their patents that may read on their contribution. This provides peace of mind to users since the Contributor would likely be prevented from pursuing patent royalties from any users of the software covering that contribution to the project.

Complexities arise when the software developer contributes code that is not claimed by any of the Contributor's patents by itself, but only when combined with the Apache 2.0 licensed open source program to which the contribution was made (i.e., the Work under the license). Thus, the Contributor owning such a patent could pursue patent royalties against a user of that revised Work. The authors of the Apache 2.0 license were forward thinking and account for this scenario. Section 3 states that the license applies to "patent claims licensable by such Contributor that are necessarily infringed... by a combination of their Contribution(s) with the Work to which such Contributions was submitted."

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Minimalism, Unity, and Snapcraft

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Adds New “Minimal Installation” Option For Fewer Preinstalled Packages

    The development of the next Ubuntu LTS release, i.e., Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, is going on in full swing. The desktop development team has decided to add a new option in the installation process that allows you to perform a lean installation of Ubuntu.

  • Unity 7.4.5 Released for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The Unity 7.4.5 update isn’t big on new features but it is big on bug fixes and general all-round improvements.

  • Snapcraft through the eyes of it’s biggest community contributor

    If you’ve spent any time in the Snapcraft forum, it’s quite likely you’ve come across Dan Llewellyn – a keen community advocate or self-proclaimed Snapcrafter. Dan has always had a passion for computing and is completely self-taught. Outside of the community, Dan is a freelance WordPress developer. After getting into the open source world around 1998, he has switched between various Linux distros including Suse, RedHat, Gentoo before settling on Ubuntu from the 5.04 release onwards. A longtime participant in the UK Ubuntu chatroom – where he met Canonical’s Alan Pope – Dan admits he was never that active before Snapcraft came along.

    It was spending time in the UK chatroom around 2016 that he discovered snaps which piqued his interest. “I saw the movement of changing Clicks to snaps and thought it was an interesting idea. It’s more widely focused than a mobile app delivery system and I’ve always liked things that also worked on the server, IoT and elsewhere” Dan comments. With a previous desire to get into mobile app development and seeing the move away from Ubuntu Touch, Dan was eager to see Snapcraft succeed and felt like it was something he could contribute to.

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