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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.11 and GNOME 3.26.1 Desktops, More

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KDE
SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, you should know that it recently received some of the latest and greatest GNU/Linux technologies through a bunch of software updates.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • S10E32 – Possessive Open Chicken

    This week we’ve been playing Wifiwars, discuss what happened at the Ubuntu Rally in New York, serve up some command line lurve and go over your feedback.

  • Write is a Fantastic Handwritten Notes App for Linux
  • The developers of Solus are hoping to improve Linux gaming with snaps and their Linux Steam Integration

    The Solus distribution [Official Site] developers are a clever bunch, with their Linux Steam Integration [GitHub] software package and snaps, they are hoping to "relieve the pressure on distributions for supporting gaming".

    When I say snaps, I'm talking the snap package system, specifically from version 2.28 onwards which supports something called "base" snaps. You can read more about the idea behind base snaps here.

  • Gentoo Linux listed RethinkDB’s website

    The rethinkdb‘s website has (finally) been updated and Gentoo Linux is now listed on the installation page!

    Meanwhile, we have bumped the ebuild to version 2.3.6 with fixes for building on gcc-6 thanks to Peter Levine who kindly proposed a nice PR on github.

  • [Slackware] Updates for LibreOffice, Pale Moon, Flash

    The LibreOffice packages were uploaded to my repository last Friday, so you probably already have that installed. Never hurts to mention it for those people who did not subscribe to my RSS feed.

  • China's Alibaba and U.S.-Based Red Hat Ink Global Software Deal

    Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce and cloud computing giant, will start selling Red Hat’s business software globally, the two companies said late Wednesday.

    Many Fortune 500 companies run Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating systems on their own servers. They may also opt to run it on third-party cloud data centers run by Amazon Web Services, Microsoft msft , or Google goog because Red Hat already has formal ties to those three companies. Now, Red Hat is also allied with Alibaba and its Aliyun cloud.

    Red Hat rht Linux and other Red Hat business software will be available from Alibaba’s cloud within months, the two companies said. The news was announced at an Alibaba tech conference in Hangzhou, China.

  • PHP version 7.0.25RC1 and 7.1.11RC1
  • ExTiX 17.8 "The Ultimate Linux System" Is First Distro Based on Ubuntu 17.10

    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton recently released a new version of his ExTiX Linux distro, which he dubs as "the Ultimate Linux System," based on Ubuntu 17.10 and Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

    Tagged as Build 171012, ExTiX 17.8 is the most recent update of the GNU/Linux distribution, which appears to be the first to be based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, but also borrowing some packages from the repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" OS.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Is Now in Final Freeze, Launches October 19

    The Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) GNU/Linux operating system is only six days apart and, according to the release schedule, it just entered Final Freeze development stage on Thursday, October 12, 2017.

    Work on Ubuntu 17.10 begun six months ago, on April 20, when the toolchain was uploaded to the repository, with the main goal of replacing our beloved Unity user interface with the latest GNOME 3 desktop environment. Two Alpha and Beta milestones later, Ubuntu 17.10 is now officially in Final Freeze stage.

  • Linux-friendly embedded PC pours on the PoE

    Aaeon’s rugged “Boxer-6639M” industrial PC supports 6th or 7th Generation Intel CPUs and provides 8x USB, 6x RS-232/422/485, 3x GbE, and 4x PoE ports.

    Over the last year, Aaeon has spun off a number of similar versions of its fanless, Linux-ready Boxer-6xxx line of fanless industrial PCs. The new Boxer-6639M is so similar to last year’s Boxer-6639 and the recent Boxer-6839 that it seems it could just as easily have been an optional SKU to either instead of a separate product. The new model does have one unique superpower, however: 4x 802.3at-compliant GbE PoE ports for up to 80W Power-over-Ethernet, which join the existing 3x standard GbE ports.

  • MEF joins ONAP to accelerate open source virtualisation

    A trade body counting Orange and Telefónica as members has joined the Linux Foundation’s Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project to use open source approaches in virtualisation.

Top 10 Open Source Linux Robots

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Back in 2014, we struggled to fill out our top 10 roundup of Linux-based robots and padded the list with conceptually similar autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition, many of those robots were proprietary or open source only on the software side. Today, however, it’s easy to fill out a top 10 list of Linux-based terrestrial robots that are open source in both software and hardware. In fact, we were forced to leave a number of worthy projects waiting in the wings.

The latest open source Linux robot to hit the scene — the Turtle Rover — won funding on Indiegogo only last week. This four-wheeled bot, which is larger and more sophisticated than typical wheeled robots like the popular, dual-wheeled GoPiGo, was designed to mimic Martian rovers. Another major player here is the recently rev’d, dual-wheeled TurtleBot 3.

Like most of our entries, these models are wheeled robots built around the Raspberry Pi. With the advent of the quad-core, WiFi-enabled RPi 3 model, we’ve seen far more advanced, and sometimes semi-autonomous Pi-based robots, in addition to the numerous RPi-based toy designs of recent years. Other SBCs have also inspired robot designs, especially the BeagleBone and BeagleBone Blue, which is especially suitable for robotics projects.

While open source hacker boards have expanded Linux robot development in recent years, a larger influence is the optimization of Linux platforms such as Ubuntu for interaction with the open source Robot Operating System (ROS) middleware. A number of our top 10 robots include ROS integration.

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Games: Forgotten Lore, Heliborne, Grandpa's Leftovers

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Gaming

OSS Leftovers

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OSS

Programming: "GitHub CEO Predict Traditional Programming’s Death", GitHub Streak, Basics of Consuming REST APIs

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Development
  • “The Future Of Coding Is No Coding At All” — Did GitHub CEO Predict Traditional Programming’s Death?

    GitHub, also called “Facebook for Programmers,” has completed a decade this year. Today, it has become a go-to place for developers to share their code with others, indulge in collaborative approaches, etc. It’s now home to 24 million total users and 1.5 million organization.

    At the company’s annual GitHub Universe user conference, company’s CEO Chris Wanstrath made his final keynote address on Wednesday. Earlier in August, he announced that he’d step down as company’s CEO as soon as a worthy replacement is found.

  • GitHub Streak: Round Four
  • The Basics of Consuming REST APIs

    APIs are becoming a very popular and a must-know if you are any type of developer. But, what is an API? API stands for Application Programming Interface. It is a way to get one software application to talk to another software application. In this article, I’ll go over the basics of what they are and why to use them.

    Nom Nom Nom! I happened to be snacking on chips while trying to think of a name for my REST API talk coming up at APIStrat in Portland. Similarly, the act of consuming or using a REST API means to eat it all up. In context, it means to eat it, swallow it, and digest it — leaving any others in the pile exposed. Sounds yummy, right?

Security: Updates, Grafeas, Cloudwashing

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Security

today's howtos

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HowTos

Etnaviv Landing Performance Counters For Linux 4.15

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Linux

Lucas Stach has sent in the Etnaviv DRM driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.15 kernel. This is one of the bigger pull requests for this reverse-engineered, open-source Vivante graphics driver.

This community-driven Vivante graphics driver continues to become more capable and feature complete with each kernel cycle. For Linux 4.15 the new work includes landing GPU performance counter support, which is important for developers in being able to analyze/tune the performance. They've been reverse engineering the Vivante performance counters for a while and now it's ready to go for Linux 4.15. There are experimental patches currently for libdrm in making use of the new API.

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Also: Intel Is Prepping A Final Batch Of Feature Changes For Linux 4.15 DRM

Dedoimedo interviews: Xfce team

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Hi, I'm Sean! I'm an Xfce core developer, Xubuntu Technical Lead, and long-time Linux user. I love solving problems ... and maintaining a desktop environment means there's no shortage of those.

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Qt World Summit and KDE Edu Sprint 2017

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KDE
  • KDE Powers up the Qt World Summit

    We also wanted to make it easy for visitors to power up their devices, so we placed plugs and USB charging stations all over our booth. Our visitors came, sat, chatted, re-charged their bodies, minds and devices, while at the same time finding out why KDE is the driving force behind many a software project. This turned out to be winning idea. A lot of people came by the "Power up!" space, and the buzz gave us the chance to demonstrate exactly how KDE could also power up their software and hardware projects. Many still perceive KDE exclusively as the creator of a desktop, but, at the ripe age of twenty, KDE is much more than that.

  • KDE Edu Sprint 2017

    Two weeks, two posts. Lets see how long I can keep up with this!

    Last weekend I was part of the KDE Edu Sprint 2017 in the Endocode offices in Berlin, just a couple of days before the Qt World Summit, which was actually my first KDE Edu sprint (if you do not count Randa 2014). It was great as always to meet other KDE developers working on educational projects and I think we got a lot of work done.

    While my primary focus going into the sprint was to work on macro support in Kig (there were many open bugs regarding macros), Aleix Pol's initial remarks helped me realize it was better to "take advantage of the fact that we were all at one place, and work on things you cannot do back home" so I decided to see what others were doing and try to help with that as well. Since Sandro Andrade was working on testing KDE Edu builds in Windows using Craft and I had been working on generating Craft recipes from Portage ebuilds, I finished a script that translates portage ebuilds from Gentoo's Portage tree into Craft recipes. This will automate low-hanging fruits like applications that basically only depend on KDE frameworks and Qt5 libraries. I committed this script to the development scripts repository in case someone finds them useful. It is a very experimental script so you are welcome to improve it!

Software and Games: Coffee, RTV (Reddit Terminal Viewer), Shakes & Fidget, ARK: Survival Evolved

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Gaming
  • Coffee – A News and Weather App for Linux

    There’s a new weather app in town and it does more than just tell the weather. Apart from being beautiful, it tells the news too and so far there are 8 different sources to choose from!

    Coffee is a recent open source project with which you can keep yourself up to date with both news feeds from around the world and the weather.

    It features a minimalist User Interface with a well-thought-out icon set and color scheme. The weather section is neatly separated from the news feed section and the settings panel is simple and intuitive enough to require no formal training.

  • RTV (Reddit Terminal Viewer) – A Simple Terminal Viewer For Reddit

    Hi folks am here with another interesting topic called RTV (Reddit Terminal Viewer) – A Simple Terminal Viewer For Reddit. It’s built in python using the curses library.

    When it come to CLI utility, i very much interested to dig more on that since i prefer CLI (Command Line Interface) most of the time instead of GUI. Not only me, many of NIX guys are there in the same mentality.

  • KING Art Games have a new Kickstarter for Shakes & Fidget, a comedy adventure game

    Love your adventure games? It seems KING Art Games are developing a new one called Shakes & Fidget which is on Kickstarter.

    King Art previously developed The Book of Unwritten Tales, The Dwarves, Battle Worlds: Kronos and more. They have a good history of Linux support and it seems this will be no different.

  • Here's a way to fix the broken water in ARK: Survival Evolved on Linux

    Also, it turns out there is a temporary workaround to get water looking nice again. Since it's not actually an issue on all maps. With thanks to this post on the ARK forum, here's what to do.

    First, you need to have "The Center - ARK Expansion Map" (free) installed. Annoyingly, all the normal methods of trying to install it failed, they just loaded ARK or showed me the Steam page for the free DLC inside the in-game overlay and nothing happened. I tried many other ways, but the only thing that worked was opting into the Steam Beta Client which somehow suddenly made it work.

Server: Systems Architecture, Kubernetes, Puppet, Alibaba and New Highs for Red Hat (RHT)

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Server
  • 5 traits of good systems architecture

    Two books helped me come to some sort of understanding about the art of being an architect. I read them a long time ago, but I still dip into them from time to time: 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know, by Richard Monson-Haefel; and Beautiful Architecture: Leading Thinkers Reveal the Hidden Beauty in Software Design, by Diomidis Spinellis and Georgios Gousios.

    What's interesting about them is that they both have multiple points of view expressed in them: some contradictory—even within each book. And this rather reflects the fact that I believe that being a systems architect is an art or a discipline. Different practitioners will have different views about it. You can talk about computer science being a hard science, and there are parts of it that are, but much of software engineering (lower case intentional) goes beyond that.

    The same, I think, is even more true for systems architecture: you may be able to grok what it is once you know it, but it's very difficult to point to something—even a set of principles—and say, "that is systems architecture." Sometimes, the easiest way to define something is by defining what it's not: e.g., search for "I know it when I see it, and the motion picture involved in this case is not that."

  • Kubernetes the not so easy way

    The simplest method to deploy and operate Kubernetes on Ubuntu is with conjure-up. Whether the substrate is a public cloud (AWS, Azure, GCP, etc) private virtualized environments (VMware) or bare metal, conjure-up will allow you to quickly deploy a fully functional, production-grade Kubernetes.

  • Puppet and Google Partner on Cloud On-Ramp
  • Alibaba Cloud to offer Red Hat open source

    Alibaba Cloud has joined the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider Program, the tech giant has announced. Through the partnership, Alibaba cloud will offer Red Hat open source solutions to Alibaba’s global customer base.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Higher on Volume Spike for October 12
  • Future growth to see about Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • RSI 87.15 Signals Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock could lead to a downward move

Desktop: 10 Best Linux Desktop Environments, Olimex Teres Emerges, Windows Breaks Itself

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GNU
Linux
  • Here’s 10 Best Linux Desktop Environments

    A desktop environment is a suite of tools which make it easier for you to use your computer. Linux users have a choice of many different desktop environments, all with their own styles and strengths. Here, we’ve created a list of the 10 best linux desktop environments.

  • Olimex Teres DIY open source laptop kit now available for $284

    The Olimex Teres I is a small laptop designed to run open source software… and which features open source hardware as well. We reported on the Teres I when the hardware design was finalized earlier this year. Now the laptop is available for purchase for 240 Euros (about $284).

  • Microsoft Fixes Windows Blue Screen Error After Patch Tuesday Update

    As a part of their monthly routine, Microsoft released the Patch Tuesday update on October 10. But other than the necessary security patches and bug fixes, it also brought BSODs to some Windows users.

Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark is Nearly Ready, Out in Less Than a Week

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Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark Enters Final Freeze — Final Release On October 19th

    The last big milestone in Ubuntu 17.10 development process was the release of Beta 2 that witnessed the participation of Ubuntu’s flagship edition which now ships with GNOME desktop environment. In a way, it was the first chance to try the new and polished features.

    “Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team is pleased to announce that artful has entered the Final Freeze period in preparation for the final release of Ubuntu 17.10 next week,” the Ubuntu Fridge announcement reads.

  • Artful Aardvark (17.10) Final Freeze

    Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team is pleased to announce that artful has entered the Final Freeze period in preparation for the final release of Ubuntu 17.10 next week.

6 reasons open source is good for business

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OSS

This also makes compliance easier; with proprietary software, you have harsh compliance clauses with large fines. Worse is what happens with some open core products that ship as a mix of GPL and proprietary software; these can breach a license and put customers at risk. And, as Gartner points out, an open core model means you get none of the benefits of open source. A pure open source licensed product avoids all these issues. Instead, you have just one compliance rule: If you make modifications to the code (not configuration, logos, or anything like that), you have to share them with those you distribute the software to if they ask.

Clearly open source is the better option. It is easier to pick the right vendor (with whom you won't be stuck), plus you benefit from more security, a stronger focus on customers, and better support. And finally, you'll know you're on legally safe footing.

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Security: Microsoft Word, Hyatt Hotels, Australian Megabreach, Impersonating iOS Password Prompts, and Equifax

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Security

Devices: PureOS Rising, Microsoft is Dying, and Raspberry Pi 7" Touch Panel Gets Linux Support

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • A new nerd phone promises true, open Linux and security

    Like the computer the new smartphone, called Librem 5, runs PureOS, a Linux-based operating system. Purism markets the phone as the truly pure GNU+Linux-based smartphone product.

    While Android is based on Linux too, PureOS is based on GNU free software and Debian Linux distribution and is entirely open source. This means that Librem 5 owners can, for example, change the Linux distribution to something else if they don't like PureOS.

  • Noted in Passing: Microsoft Smartphone OS Platform Passed Away

    Oh. One more bit. I was the first to also tell you that Google won the battle of the century for the OS of all high tech - when Android was passing Windows (all devices, not just smartphones, but PCs included). Nobody else told you that either. It is now becoming apparent to many experts that Google owns the tech world via Android. Who told you first? The dude who saw how Windows was truly collapsing and that iOS was never a threat to Google's world domination plans. Yeah, we'll return to those issues in coming years no doubt. Goodbye Windows smartphones and by darn it, good riddance too! Ballmer gone. Elop gone. Lumia gone. Windows smartphone OS gone. Now when can we see Microsoft the company gone too, please, next?

  • Raspberry Pi 7" Touch Panel, SiI9234 To Be Supported By Linux 4.15

    Daniel Vetter has sent in the latest feature pull request of new drm-misc-next material for staging in DRM-Next ahead of the Linux 4.15 kernel cycle.

    This latest batch of miscellaneous Direct Rendering Manager updates include continued core work around atomic mode-setting, HDMI CEC control support for the adv7511 driver, remote control support for the sii8620 driver, improved HDMI and A31 chip support in the Sun4i DRM driver, and some new driver activity too.

OSS: SUSECon, FOSS, ONAP, GitHub, Volkswagen, WhereBy.Us

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OSS
  • SUSE spreads the open source message – through videos

    German Linux company SUSE Linux is well-known for its Linux and other open source solutions. It is also known for producing videos for geeks and debuting them at its annual SUSECon conference.

    This year, in Prague, was no different. The company, which marked its 25th year on 2 September, came up with two videos, one to mark the occasion and the other all about Linux and open source.

  • What is Open Source?

    Open source technology has been around for decades. Driven by passionate developers and engineers, the open source movement is a hotbed of innovation and collaboration - but what does 'open source' actually mean?

    'Open source' as a term is most commonly used to refer to software where the creators have made the source code freely available online. Anyone is free to view, download, use and even modify it. This has led to thriving communities on code-hosting sites like Github, where devs contribute to each others' work, joining forces to build and improve applications on their own time.

  • ONAP and MEF Join Each Others’ Groups, Collaborate on LSO

    MEF and the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) are officially working together, the organizations announced today at the SDN and NFV World Congress. MEF has joined ONAP as an associate member. And the Linux Foundation, which hosts ONAP, has joined MEF as an auditing member.

  • 'Most open source software coders on GitHub from product firms’

    Notwithstanding that ITes companies have the highest number of software engineers, major contribution towards open source code writing is made by developers in product firms such as Amazon, while services firms like TCS and Cognizant are fast catching up, says a survey.

    According to a survey by talent acquisition start-up Belong, Amazon had the highest number of registered users on Github, followed by Cognizant, TCS and Microsoft.

    The survey covered 75,000 Indian engineers that have a presence on GitHub — one of the largest communities where software developers host and review code.

  • Volkswagen undergoes culture shift to match its new open source approach

    "Some years ago we set up a lab situation for running apps in Berlin," says Schade. "We set up Cloud Foundry there, we used it, and we now have a very stable platform and a lot of knowledge – they are a kind of a role model now for the company where we try to adapt things as much as it’s possible in a huge company like Volkswagen."

  • WhereBy.Us Is Building Open-Source Analytics for Smaller Publishers
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More in Tux Machines

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers

The origin and evolution of FreeDOS

Over the years, developers have shared with me how they use FreeDOS to run embedded systems. My all-time favorite example is a developer who used FreeDOS to power a pinball machine. FreeDOS ran an application that controlled the board, tallied the score, and updated the back display. I don't know exactly how it was built, but one way such a system could work is to have every bumper register a "key" on a keyboard bus and the application simply read from that input. I thought it was cool. People sometimes forget about legacy software, but it pops up in unexpected places. I used to be campus CIO of a small university, and once a faculty member brought in some floppy disks with old research data on them. The data wasn't stored in plaintext files, rather as DOS application data. None of our modern systems would read the old data files, so we booted a spare PC with FreeDOS, downloaded a shareware DOS program that could read the application data, and exported the data to plaintext. Read more