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Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support

    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.

  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month

    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch.

    One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux!

    Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.

  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux

    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'.

    Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.

  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone

    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable.

    Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.

  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support

    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows.

    This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Review: Google Pixel 2

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping.

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LibreOffice 6.0 Arrives Late January 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts Soon

Filed under
LibO

Now that the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event is over, it's time for The Document Foundation to start the bug hunting sessions, and the first one was set for the end of the week, October 20, 2017, for the first Alpha release of the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite.

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World’s smallest i.MX6 module tapped for customizable Linux SBC

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Linux

Gumstix has added NXP’s tiny, Linux-driven SCM-i.MX6 module to its Geppetto design library, and has launched a “Cobalt MC” SBC to showcase the tiny COM.

Gumstix continues to add more computer-on-modules and single board computers to its Geppetto D2O design library, offering more options for developers to build custom board designs online for prototyping and quick manufacture of small runs. The latest addition, following its support for the Raspberry Pi and Pi Compute Module via its Gumstix Pi boards, is support for NXP’s tiny dual-core i.MX6 based SCM-i.MX6D COM, as well as for a similar quad-core SCM-i.MX6Q.

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KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Over 30 Bugs Fixed

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KDE

Just one week after the release of the major KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment, the KDE Project on Tuesday announced the immediate availability of the maintenance update to the series, KDE Plasma 5.11.1.

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Image Processing on Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've covered several scientific packages in this space that generate nice graphical representations of your data and work, but I've not gone in the other direction much. So in this article, I cover a popular image processing package called ImageJ. Specifically, I am looking at Fiji, an instance of ImageJ bundled with a set of plugins that are useful for scientific image processing.

The name Fiji is a recursive acronym, much like GNU. It stands for "Fiji Is Just ImageJ". ImageJ is a useful tool for analyzing images in scientific research—for example, you may use it for classifying tree types in a landscape from aerial photography. ImageJ can do that type categorization. It's built with a plugin architecture, and a very extensive collection of plugins is available to increase the available functionality.

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4MRecover 23.0 Data Recovery Linux Live System Enters Beta, Based on 4MLinux 23

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Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ is informing us today on the immediate availability for download of the Beta release of his upcoming 4MRecover 23.0 live system designed for data recovery tasks.

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Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and elementary OS All Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug

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Security

As you are aware, there's a major WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access II) security vulnerability in the wild, affecting virtually any device or operating system that uses the security protocol, including all GNU/Linux distributions.

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Pixel 2 and 2 XL review—The best Android phone you can buy

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Welcome to year two of Google Hardware. In 2016, Google jumped into the Android hardware space with its first self-branded device, the Google Pixel. Google's software prowess shined on the Pixel 1, offering up exclusive features like the Google Assistant, the best Android camera thanks to advanced software processing, fast day-one OS updates and betas, and the smoothest, best-performing overall build of Android. The killer software package made it the best Android phone of the previous generation.

The Pixel still represented Google's first foray into smartphone hardware, though, and it didn't offer anything special in the hardware department. It was a bland-looking iPhone clone. It had the same specs and basic design as everything else. The Pixel even skipped water resistance, which had become an expected feature at that price point. Google said it wanted to make its own hardware, but it didn't actually build special hardware.

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6 Best Open Source Alternatives to Microsoft Office for Linux

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Linux

Looking for Microsoft Office in Linux? Here are the best free and open source alternatives to Microsoft Office for Linux.
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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Search for a way to get home in 'Estranged: Act II' now on Linux

    Continuing on from the first part, Estranged: Act II [Steam, Official Site] is now available on Linux. The developer switched from Source to Unreal Engine for the second part as well.

  • Strategy game 'Mushroom Wars 2' arrives on Linux
  • Meson-ized Mesa Now Supports More Drivers

    At the end of September initial Meson support landed in Mesa while hitting 17.3-devel Git now is support for more of the Mesa drivers under this new build system.

    As of Monday in Mesa Git, the Meson build system now supports building LLVMpipe, Softpipe, Nouveau, RadeonSI, Gallium3D winsys, Gallium3D state trackers and other components, and a variety of other changes. In other words, it's now much more practical using Meson in Mesa now that it's beginning to support almost all of the Mesa3D drivers/components.

  • Private Internet Access becomes a KDE Patron

    "We are very happy to have the Private Internet Access/London Trust Media as a KDE Patron and KDE e.V. Advisory Board member. The values of Internet openness are deeply rooted in both organisations, as well as those of privacy and security. Working together will allow us to build better systems and a better Internet for everyone", said Aleix Pol Gonzalez, Vice-President of the KDE e.V.

    "Private Internet Access is highly committed to giving back to those communities that have helped the brand and its parent company get to where it is today, and we are very much aware that vast proportions of the infrastructure we use on a daily basis, in the office and at home, is powered by Free and Open Source Software. We have made a pledge to show our gratitude by supporting FOSS projects to help encourage development and growth. We are proud to be supporting KDE and the crucial work that the project does for the Linux Desktop" said Christel Dahlskjear, Director of Sponsorships and Events at Private Internet Access.

  • Indian enterprise suffers from the innovator's dilemma: Benjamin Henshall, Red Hat

    "Open source projects are like children; no two projects are exactly the same, with different communities, structures, governance and contributors," says Benjamin Henshall, Director, AppDev Solutions, APAC at Red Hat.

    According to Henshall, open source, which is now the preferred model for consuming software will build the next generation IT systems. Speaking with Computerworld India, Henshall talks about how open source is the foundation for successful IoT deployment and how Red Hat is still the leader in this space.

  • What I have found interesting in Fedora during the week 41 of 2017

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • MiniDebConf Prishtina 2017

    On 7th of October in Prishtina, Kosova’s capital, was hosted the first mini deb conference.
    The MiniDebConf Prishtina was an event open to everyone, regardless of their level of knowledge about Debian or other free and open source projects. At MiniDebConf Prishtina there were organized a range of topics incidental to Debian and free software, including any free software project, Outreachy internship, privacy, security, digital rights and diversity in IT.

  • No more no surprises

    Debian has generally always had, as a rule, “sane defaults” and “no surprises”. This was completely shattered for me when Vim decided to hijack the mouse from my terminal and break all copy/paste functionality. This has occured since the release of Debian 9.

  • Debian Security Advisory 3999-1

    Debian Linux Security Advisory 3999-1 - Mathy Vanhoef of the imec-DistriNet research group of KU Leuven discovered multiple vulnerabilities in the WPA protocol, used for authentication in wireless networks. Those vulnerabilities applies to both the access point (implemented in hostapd) and the station (implemented in wpa_supplicant).

  • LXD Weekly Status #19

    This past week, part of the team was back in New York for more planning meetings, getting the details of the next 6 months, including LXC, LXD and LXCFS 3.0 fleshed out.

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • wikipedia2text – A Command Line Tool For Querying The Wikipedia Article

    Hi folks am back with another interesting topic called wikipedia2text. It’s a small Shell script to query the Wikipedia articles in console, also it can open the article in any browser.

    This shell script uses text-browser to query and render Wikipedia articles. The output will be printed to standard out. It Currently supports around 30 Wikipedia languages.

    Most of us prefer Wikipedia to know the detailed information about any company or any product information & it’s history. For any google search by default Wikipedia link comes in Top 5.

  • Yay! I Found Yet Another Reliable AUR Helper

    Howdy Arch Users! I’ve got a good news for you. Today, I stumbled upon yet another reliable AUR helper called “Yay”. Yep! the name of this AUR helper is Yay. Currently, I use Pacaur for installing AUR packages. It does great job and I really like it. I also have used other AUR helpers such as Packer and Yaourt in the past. After reading its features, I thought to give “Yay” a try and see how things works. So, here we go!

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  • mount.nfs: requested NFS version or transport protocol is not supported
  • How to Deploy Clojure Web Application on Debian 9
  • Copr stack dockerized!
  • Using Dell Dock With Ubuntu

    Over the years I have found my way around many minor hurdles when using Ubuntu, the most recent being Using the DELL ULTRAHD 4K USB 3.0 DOCKING STATION (D3100).

GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Google and IBM launch open-source security tool for containers

    Google and IBM, together with a few other partners, released an open-source project that gathers metadata that developers can use to secure their software.

    According to an IBM blog post, the goal of the project is to help developers keep security standards, while microservices and containers cut the software supply chain.

  • Top 10 Hacking Techniques Used By Hackers

    We live in a world where cyber security has become more important than physical security, thousands of websites and emails are hacked daily. Hence, It is important to know the Top hacking techniques used by hackers worldwide to exploit vulnerable targets all over the internet.

  • Protect your wifi on Fedora against KRACK

    You may have heard about KRACK (for “Key Reinstallation Attack”), a vulnerability in WPA2-protected Wi-Fi. This attack could let attackers decrypt, forge, or steal data, despite WPA2’s improved encryption capabilities. Fear not — fixes for Fedora packages are on their way to stable.

  • Federal watchdog tells Equifax—no $7.25 million IRS contract for you

    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) on Monday rejected Equifax's bid to retain its $7.25 million "taxpayer identity" contract—the one awarded days after Equifax announced it had exposed the Social Security numbers and other personal data of some 145 million people.

  • Adobe Flash vulnerability exploited by BlackOasis hacking group to plant FinSpy spyware

    Security researchers have discovered a new Adobe Flash vulnerability that has already been exploited by hackers to deploy the latest version of FinSpy malware on targets. Kaspersky Lab researchers said a hacker group called BlackOasis has already taken advantage of the zero-day exploit – CVE-2017-11292 – to deliver its malicious payload via a Microsoft Word document.

  • Companies turn a blind eye to open source risk [Ed: No, Equifax got b0rked due to bad practices, negligence, incompetence, not FOSS]

    For instance, criminals who potentially gained access to the personal data of the Equifax customers exploited an Apache Struts CVE-2017-5638 vulnerability.

  • Checking Your Passwords Against the Have I Been Pwned List

    Two months ago, Troy Hunt, the security professional behind Have I been pwned?, released an incredibly comprehensive password list in the hope that it would allow web developers to steer their users away from passwords that have been compromised in past breaches.

How to use an Arduino and Raspberry Pi to turn a fiber optic neural network into wall art

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Hollywood has made many big promises about artificial intelligence (AI): how it will destroy us, how it will save us, and how it will pass us butter. One of the less memorable promises is how cool it will look.

There's a great example of amazing AI visualization in Avengers: Age of Ultron when Tony Stark's AI butler Jarvis interacts with Ultron and we see an organic floating network of light morphing and pulsing. I wanted to make something similar to fill blank space on my apartment wall (to improve upon the usual Ikea art). Obviously, I couldn't create anything as amazing as Jarvis as a floating orb of light; however, I could use a machine learning algorithm that looks interesting with quirky data visualization: a neural network! It employs biologically inspired elements that were meant to replicate how (we thought) the human brain works.

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Red Hat: Alibaba, CRI-O, Silencing Critics

Filed under
Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

MongoDB's successful IPO reflects its differences with traditional open source

MongoDB had a good first day of trading with share prices popping roughly 25% over their opening. As the latest big data platform company to IPO, Mongo's fortunes are being compared and equated to Cloudera and Hortonworks. As upstarts, each is in a race to grow business while whittling down the red ink. Cloudera and Hortonworks are a bit further along this path as their operating losses have begun trending downward - but that happened only after those companies went public. Read more

today's leftovers

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."